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  • Aaron Murakami
    replied
    1. Were the caps going from the top of the plug to the engine ground? If so, then you are trying to simply add peaking caps to the plug. With 3 in series, probably too much capacitance and sucked up all the spark so there isn't anything to jump the gap.

    2. On the MSD with diodes, the diode needs to go from positive of primary of coil directly to the top of the plug bypassing the entire distributor and cable or the resistances will eat it up. Also, you have to verify the polarity of the HV of your ignition coil. That will determine which direction the diodes need to be facing.

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  • theplummer
    replied
    Originally posted by Aaron Murakami View Post
    You must use a cdi/msd before you can add the diodes - the diodes are simply directing the low voltage cap over the gap when it is ionized by the hv spark. There are msd/cdi units for v8's so they are not too fast. One diode per plug is to distribute the cap impulses through multiple diodes to extend their life - it isn't about timing. You can do all cylinders on a single diode, but the diode will get a serious workout. With the speed, the deal is that at low speeds, the ignition will trigger 6-7 times per cycle but at high RPM's it will gradually reduce until you only get one discharge per cycle. Or course this is with MSD (multiple spark discharge) - with a regular CDI, it will always be one single discharge per cycle.
    I suppose we must not be in sync with the two different situations. Allow me to clarify, just so we are both on the same page.

    Yesterdays dyno test was on a small garden tractor motor, without any type of capacitive discharge ignition. It had a simple stock style magnet on flywheel, to pickup coil. On that particular motor, I tried to take three small capacitors in series and connect them to the spark plug. The engine would not fire. The capacitors acted like a kill switch by grounding the top of the plug to the engine. I was told by another former member of this forum, that it's possible that the caps were bad, and that I should check to see if there is any resistance from one end of the cap string to the other. There was no resistance, by meter, I just got the OL on the meter. So that should have worked, but it didn't.

    Now, today's dyno test was on a small block Chevy, using a MSD 6AL, with a super blaster 2 coil. On this setup, I placed the recommended diode from the positive side of the input on the coil, to the coil to distributor wire. There was a timing light connected to spark plug #1. When I had the diode connected to to the coil as seen in multiple videos and from your information, I got no spark to plug #1, and the engine would not fire.

    I then checked for continuity and voltage between the input side of the coil, to ground, with ignition on and have no voltage or continuity. But the engine would start and run without the diode in place. I checked for continuity across the diode to see if it was bad and got no continuity in either direction when connecting a test light and a 12 volt battery.

    I then decided that maybe the engine needed to already be running before making the diode connection to the coil. So I placed the wire on the distributor side, but left the input side loose, I had ahold of the wire with a pair of rubber handled pliers, and when the engine fired, I got a shock from the coil, through the insulation and the rubber handles on the pliers. The shock was not devestating, I could hold it, but I was afraid of trying to make the connection to the coil and opted to have the engine shut off instead.

    What am I doing wrong with both of those scenerios?

    Now, the results of the dyno with the EnergyXciter. The small block performed best without the energyXciter with 39 degrees of timing advance. We placed the exiter on the batteries powering the MSD and starter (as always), installed halves of the energyXciter on each of the plug wires at the distributor cap, and placed the exciters around the fuel lines.

    The first pull with the timing at 39 degrees, lost 7hp. I then knew I needed to retard the timing as burning hydrogen in fuel makes the fuel ignite faster, so I retarded the timing 3 degrees. We immediately picked up what we had lost, and added another 2Hp to the pull. I then retarded the timing 2 more degrees and lost the 2hp that we had picked up.

    Later evaluation as to why we didn't see as big a gain as we normally see. We noticed that the engine builder had zip tied all the plug wires together from the back of the engine, under the headers. We believe this may have caused a harmonic that interfered with the effectiveness of the exciters on the plug wires.

    We also noticed that the fuel line was very short, so as to (possibly) not create enough friction (which is what powers the exiters) in the fuel due to a short fuel line. As well as the fuel line was a high pressure steel braided line that was very thick, and had steel braiding in between the layers of rubber hose.... No excuses, we aren't going to give up, we just believe this may have contributed to us not seeing the typical 5% power increase that we saw the previous day.

    My hopes are to figure out how to make the plasma ignition with both the CDI as well as non CDI work in conjunction with the energyXciters, to try to maximize their potential. This could lead to even running a engine totally on water, but I've got to get the ignition working first.

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  • Hellenic Vanagon
    replied
    My, (inductively trigered), mkII Plasma: (Are you ready?)

    Last edited by Hellenic Vanagon; 04-06-2018, 02:20 PM.

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  • Aaron Murakami
    replied
    Originally posted by Gary Hammond View Post
    Hi Aaron,



    I have the "generation 1" fuel injection kit from CB Performance. They are now up to generation 4.

    The one I have runs in open loop and the dash mounted module controls the MAP signal to the ECU. The other ECU inputs are engine temp, throttle position, and RPM. There is no oxygen sensor feedback to the ECU. The fuel pressure is regulated mechanically by the manifold pressure. The dash control module has two adjusting knobs, one for low rpm (idle) and one for high rpm (full power). Here's a picture of the 4 generations. The dash module of the one I have is shown on the left as First Gen. I purchased it back in 2001.



    Here's a picture of the engine it's installed on.

    Thanks Gary,

    I'm getting a jet kit for my Weber on the Datsun to see how far I can lean and still get a temp drop. If it is too much of a pain, I might get a fuel injected throttle body and control it with the type of system you're using.

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  • Aaron Murakami
    replied
    Originally posted by Ron Hammar View Post
    Hi Aaron,

    Could you please tell me if you have a generator to be used in the video that is in this posting video?

    I have been working on fully vaporizing my gas and water with the hot manifold because of the high feat coming out of the cylinders which would make a dry steam and feed it into the engine with a plasma spark and the set up in this video looks like it could do the trick.
    Hi Ron,

    The video did not show up.

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