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Gary's "Complete Advanced" SSG Build

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  • Hi Gary, RS,

    I just finished watching the video “beyond the Bedini SG”. There is a ton I’d like to discuss, but for now I have a couple of practical questions regarding hardware: TeslaGenX will be shipping the order I’ve placed shortly, if there is some additional hardware I want to order, I better add it to my current order quickly.

    -In one of your videos you posted/showed me earlier, I think I remember seeing a battery swapping system. Is this the same as discussed here in this video? Did you make it yourself, or was it a bought kit? (I didn’t see it on the TeslaGenX website).
    -The master coil that is used in this multi coil machine Peter is demonstrating, has (a) separate winding(s) to charge the battery in position C. Do you know if that is one of the standard coils from the TeslaGenX website, with some of the windings used for the battery in position C? Or is this a completely different/custom coil, not of the shelf?


    I’ll still come back to your post #105.

    Best regards,
    Rodolphe
    Last edited by pearldragon; 01-12-2021, 02:18 AM.

    Comment


    • Hi Rodolphe,

      Is this the same as discussed here in this video? Did you make it yourself, or was it a bought kit?
      I made it myself. And yes, it works the same as the custom made one in the video. Only difference is, I wired mine to split the negative instead of split the positive. That allowed me use my standard coil without having to make a new coil with an isolated output winding. Tom told me at the conference, where that video was recorded, that Teslagenx might eventially offer the swapper in kit form. But I don't think that has ever materialized. I've also modified mine to switch either with set timing like the one in the video, or switch when a pot tuneable voltage reference is reached.

      One other big difference is that I have only run mine with 12 volt input. The one in the video was running with 24 volt input. This greatly affects the overall performance. ............. I made my swapper so it can work with 24 volt input to the SSG, but don't have enough of the proper batteries to do this, so haven't tried it on 24 volts yet.

      Do you know if that is one of the standard coils from the TeslaGenX website, with some of the windings used for the battery in position C? Or is this a completely different/custom coil, not of the shelf?
      That was a special custom coil wound on a taller, wider spool. I think it was wound with 4 power windings and one isolated winding all from AWG 18 wire. I've never seen this coil listed on the Teslagenx web page. You would have to ask them if they would custom make another one.

      I do have several spools, like used in the video, that Erik made for me on special order that are 3-D printed. I've not had a chance to wind them or make cores for them yet. My plan was to make a larger machine with multiple generator coils. I got bogged down with other projects and haven't gotten back to this one yet.

      Gary Hammond,
      Last edited by Gary Hammond; 12-09-2020, 03:51 PM. Reason: add info

      Comment


      • Hi Gary, RS,

        John was not always clear in his explanations and sometimes used generalizations to make a point.
        This is what I’ve experienced/noticed as well. Sometimes hard to navigate between “literally” and “as a manner of speaking”. But with you and RS as beacons along the free energy sea, I’ve managed so far .


        What I was trying to do was compare the SSG in common ground mode to a conventional brush type motor driving a conventional, rectified alternator. In order to charge the battery conventionally with enough current to equal the performance of the SSG in CG mode would require a lot of input power from the drive motor
        Ok I understand what you tried to point out now.

        We're talking about CG mode here, not radiant. And with either mode, I think the drag comes only from bearing friction, wind resistance, and a small amount from generating the trigger coil current. In attraction mode the run current assists and causes the running of the machine, which is in opposition to any drag forces. The magnetic attraction of the permanent magnets due to the steel in the core is the same on approach as it is on escape for a net zero effect. Not sure how the coil collapse affects all this, but probably does in some way.
        Wind and bearing friction I would call I’d call (mechanical) friction. While “drag” is what I use for magnetic attraction when the wheel wants to spin away -> “dragging the wheel”.
        The (mechanical) friction should not/barely changing over the time of the charging process (once the machine is up to speed) and thus is not responsible for the change in speed of the rotor towards the end of the charge.
        In theory the drag caused by the trigger circuit should in theory not differ much when the magnet moved towards the coil and when it moves away from it.
        So then the main difference for the increase in speed should come from the decrease in drag from the coil collapse/discharge I reckon, due to reduction in energy stored in the coil, due to the decrease in input amperage and voltage, so this in turn decreases the attraction towards the magnet too. However, the net effect is that the rotor increases in speed, so there is a asymmetry, which is then probably party where the spike is responsible for. Maybe I’m going to far into this for now, and besides I just realized I made a false comparison between the statement of JB (“this is not gonna drag”) and my reference to the other thread in my post #104, since there the discussion about the generator coil, while JB was just talking about the SG, without a gen. coil.


        John did say you can rotate batteries from charge to run position with no ill effects on the battery. It does charge mostly with current, but there is still a small radiant spike there that can be seen on an o-scope. If you stop charging at 15.3 volts and keep the electrolyte at the proper level, I think battery degradation would be very slow compared to using a "hot" charger.
        Ok, I understand.

        Best regards,
        Rodolphe

        Comment


        • Hi Gary,

          When ponder some more about the differences between your machine and mine, I remembered that the spec of my AWG10 wires, that I use to connect the batteries is standard BRASS and not 100% copper... Any idea if this could be a culprit as well for the 25% performance difference or would the difference only be marginal, copper vs brass? (in my contact with TeslaGenX I asked them the same question awaiting answer).

          I'll come back to your post #102 at a later point.

          Best regards,
          rodolphe

          Comment


          • Hi Rodolphe,

            I've never even heard of brass wire other than as for filler rod in brazing and similar use. It is used as electrical connectors, but I've never seen it used as an electrical "wire". There are various alloys of brass with varying values of resistance. I think all brass alloys have less electrical conductivity than pure copper.

            Gary Hammond

            Comment


            • Hi Gary, RS,

              Could I double check with you that for your SG you use the following diodes: 1N4007 and for the C.G. mode mod you use two 1N5408G in parallel? In case you bought them online, do you have a weblink for me for both parts?
              My links are:
              HVCA - 1N4007
              https://nl.rs-online.com/web/p/misce...us/2550069851/

              ON Semiconductor - 1N5408G
              https://nl.rs-online.com/web/p/switc...iodes/7743344/


              In my test report from post#26*, I noticed that using a diode in the hall/mosfet circuit had a huge impact. Also in the video “beyond the advanced handbook” Peter shows that using a diode in the battery swapper makes a difference. Lastly, on this thread** about it, I also read that different diodes yield different results.
              Still pondering where the difference in performance in our machines comes from, I thought it might be good to verify once more that we have 100% the same diodes.

              TeslaGenX shipped out my order, so if diodes are the same, I soon can finally make a start with crossing/checking all the components that were still on my check list:
              -TeslaGenX battery starter
              -Coil with R60 rods and spray-paint isolated
              -New circuit board with TeslaGenX matched transistors and 470-Ohm resistors.
              -Batteries


              Another thing that I’m still wondering about regarding the performance of our machines, is that my variable resistor / potmeter is 2W*** and still working, while I remember that you said your initial potmeter burned out, and you replaced it with a higher wattage version. I tried to find your post about it back, but can’t find it.
              On the other hand, maybe it doesn’t say so much about the performance of the machine; the reason could also have been that your initial potmeter was not able to handle the voltage spikes very well due to its physical construction… Curious to hear what your thoughts are.


              *https://www.energyscienceforum.com/f...rvations/page2
              **https://www.energyscienceforum.com/f...ndemann/page24
              ***https://nl.rs-online.com/web/p/potentiometers/6928513/

              Best regards,
              Rodolphe
              Last edited by pearldragon; 01-25-2021, 08:29 AM.

              Comment


              • Hi Gary, RS,

                Another thing that came to my mind is the ON-time of the transistor we talked about. I had another look at my ON-time comparison between all my rotors, post #78. And what I was thinking is that if the free energy comes mainly from the spike… and the current draw from the ON-time, that it is not ON-time alone that is important, but the combined information of ON-time and RPMs… it is a pity that I haven’t monitored the RPMs accurately. However, the rotor didn’t seem to make a difference in performance at that point, so there is no point in redoing the tests now. Only when I improve my overall performance (hopefully with the new TeslaGenX parts), the influence of the rotor will show too hopefully and I can re-try to optimize the rotor.

                Best regards,
                Rodolphe


                P.S. Would a solid-state SG not be more efficient? I mean, the transistor can then just conduct current for as long as is needed to saturate the coil and then let the magnetic field collapse… Now the transistor conducts way longer past the point that the coil is saturated. This energy is not (completely) wasted since it is used to attract the rotor, but still I wander if a solidstate version would yield higher results.

                Comment


                • Hi Rodolphe,

                  Could I double check with you that for your SG you use the following diodes: 1N4007 and for the C.G. mode mod you use two 1N5408G in parallel? In case you bought them online, do you have a weblink for me for both parts?
                  The 1N4007 diodes I use came in the kit from Teslagenx, and the ON Semiconductor 1N5408G ones came from Newark. https://www.newark.com/w/search?brand=on-semiconductor&st=1n5408

                  I thought it might be good to verify once more that we have 100% the same diodes.
                  The 1N4007 diodes being the same would be the most critical. The 1N5408 diodes being different shouldn't really matter that much. I got the best results, (COP 1.25), without them at all.

                  Another thing that I’m still wondering about regarding the performance of our machines, is that my variable resistor / potmeter is 2W*** and still working, while I remember that you said your initial potmeter burned out, and you replaced it with a higher wattage version. I tried to find your post about it back, but can’t find it.
                  On the other hand, maybe it doesn’t say so much about the performance of the machine; the reason could also have been that your initial potmeter was not able to handle the voltage spikes very well due to its physical construction… Curious to hear what your thoughts are.
                  I've never burned out a pot on this machine, only on some older, smaller machines. I didn't use a pot at all on this machine until more recently.

                  When I got the test results you are trying to match it didn't have any pot at all. It only used the the 12 ohm, 10 watt power resistor that came with the kit. And the only tuning was from adjusting the air gap between the coil and magnets and installing two fans to the wheel. This was back in 2014. Here's a link to where I first posted it. Look at post #30 and post #44 here. https://www.energyscienceforum.com/forum/alternative-energy/john-bedini/bedini-sg-official-monopole-forum/bedini-monopole-3-beginners/1354-why-not-shown-how-to-charge-one-battery-with-the-other-at-the-offical-bedini-forum/page3

                  Gary Hammond,
                  Last edited by Gary Hammond; 01-25-2021, 08:38 PM.

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