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  • #91
    Hi Rodolphe,

    I had a feeling maybe you are an engineer, with all your attention to detail and exactness. LOL Just curious, what is your engineering specialty?

    Here's a link to the welding rod I use on all my projects. It's the R60 grade JB recommended in all his videos. https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/59802314?rItem=59802314
    The R value of the rod specifies the tensile strength, which is a result of it's alloying content and is pretty standardized in the U.S. I cut them to maybe 3mm longer than the spool and then paint them with acrylic black paint to help increase resistance between them and reduce eddy currents. After they dry I pack them into the spool as tightly as possible, driving in the last 2 or 3 with a hammer. Next I put supper glue on the ends of the rods until it soaks all the way through to the bottom end. And lastly, I grind the rod ends flush with the ends of the spool to get the copper wire turns as close as possible to the end of the core.

    As for the base resistors, if you have resistors at 100.1 ohms and 99.9 ohms that's .2 ohms difference or expressed as percentage .2% difference. If you have 470 ohm resistors with one at 470.1 and one at 469.9 with .2 ohms difference that's only
    .2/470 or .04255%. It's much easier to get a good match with higher resistance values. And for some reason, using fixed resistors in each branch that are near the total required value, with only a low value pot, seems to produce a more stable circuit than one that uses a larger value pot. The main base resistance remains more closely matched with only a small value tuning pot. Plus pots are less stable than fixed resistors and will sometimes drift when in use.

    As for the MJL21194 transistors available, they are not all created equal in quality. Some of the cheap Chinese ones on E-bay are very low quality and have a high failure rate. Even when closely matched, they can still cause problems with performance and reliability. Be sure to use only ones from a reputable manufacturer and trusted supplier. Since I didn't want to buy a hundred or more transistors to get a good match, I just ordered them from Teslagenx in the kit along with the matched resistors.

    Gary Hammond,


    P.S. There's one other little thing I forgot to mention before. When I first ran the test that I reported on my home page, I had the charge battery negative connected directly to the negative of the primary batteries without going through the isolation diode. This gave the best results. I added the isolation diode at a later date which dropped the COP from 1.25 to about 1.13 as best I remember. When the batteries are less than .6 volts apart, which is the forward voltage drop of the output diodes, they don't self equalize when the negatives are connected together.

    Adding the isolation diode raises this to 1.2 volts required to self equalize, which allows for a greater voltage difference between the primary and secondary. It also introduces more total resistance and a longer charge time.
    Last edited by Gary Hammond; 09-24-2020, 02:39 PM.

    Comment


    • #92
      "When you say ‘to help out I assume you mean in the way of generating energy? Not in the way of causing drag/bringing the RPMs down?"

      I mean both. The drag lowers the current draw of a SG/SSG helping to up the COP. A genny coil/coils up's total COP by utilizing the 33% mechanical output of a SG/SSG that is wasted otherwise.
      I have lit Led arrays from genny coils, but using genny coils to feed a cap pulser and charge a 2nd primary input battery is the best use of genny coils out put. I have also used genny coils to cap pulse back pop the primary drive battery momentarily, while the SG/SSG continues to run from a BIG Cap during the back pop. There is a circuit I posted for this here on the forum some where.

      "I think we misunderstood each other here. I actually meant a radiant battery charger, like this one: http://www.teslagenx.com/chargers/tx...egory=chargers."

      SG = Cap pulser charger
      SSG = the direct diode to battery charger
      I have used chargers like the one you link to, to charge primary battery's, and that is a good place for you to start.
      Once a battery is conditioned for several cycles with the Bedini cap pulser, they will run a SG/SSG far longer than a standard charger battery will, as they keep losing capacity each time you discharge them and recharge them (sulphnation)sp, where a Bedini charged battery gets better and better, each charge / discharge cycle. (desulphnation)sp

      "I was hoping you’d have a SG performing above COP 1, with a PCB board with 100 Ohm resistors like mine"

      No, I do not have any TeslagenX SSG PCB's stuffed up, although I do have 1. My designed SSG PCB's are 16 transistors each. With 3 of these for my 6 coil 48 strand/transistor SSG that charged L16 Battery's at 24V, that I described the branched trigger resistor layout in my last post.

      Do you use a auto Lamp in your trigger circuits? That really helps to keep a SG/SSG in tune while a primary battery runs down.... This is a trick that JB ask me to try for him and report back to him on the results, over 6 mo's before he told the rest of the forums about it.

      "Anyhow, with the core material being the new candidate"

      I use the Lincoln Electric Brand copper coated R60 rods. I cut them to length and soak them in water overnight so they rust and develop a green patina that reduces Eddie currents in the core, keeping them from getting hot.

      "Did you start rebuilding afterwards?"

      It took 8 mo's to go through it all, and do the innovatory for the insurance company. I rebuilt the shop. Then 2 years ago we were forced to move because TxDot want to build a new highway loop across the front 1/2 of our property taking out the house, garage and my greenhouse/aquaponics system. Now I have a new shop over at our new location, because the old shop on the back 1/2 is too far away to go there to work. Now that it has cooled down from the summer heat, I will show pics and video of the new shop soon, when I start putting the Ferris Wheel together inside it.

      Comment


      • #93
        Hi Gary, RS,

        Thanks Gary, I’m a Mechanical Engineer, a contractor. Not so much calculations (I do some), more design, prototyping. I work a lot with the CAD program Solidworks.

        Welding Rods / Core
        I updated my post #89: The link and Rods I stated there are incorrect; I used R45 rods, link is updated too.

        Thanks for your link. Do you know if those rods are the same as TeslaGenX uses (still awaiting their answer)? / Did you only ordered the pre-wound coil and ordered the rods yourself?

        Although TeslaGenX uses R60 too, as mentioned, they do not necessarily have to be the exact same composition.
        In case you do have the exact same rods as TeslaGenX, I just might buy those to eliminate doubt for the dutch equivalent, see next paragraph. Assuming that the weldingrod do not come with a clear (isolation) coating, spray painting the rods is a good idea… I assume that would make a difference too. And lastly, I grind the rod ends flush with the ends of the spool to get the copper wire turns as close as possible to the end of the core. A bit in doubt whether I understand you or not; you mean grinding the tops of the rods flush with the spool (where the magnets pass by). In case you have picture to indicate what you mean this would eliminate doubt.


        The rods from your website are Blue Demon RG60-063-01T probably with these specs: https://weldingmaterialsales.com/catalog/r60/ (blue demon website), spec sheet in attachment. I tried to find the same here and found these:
        https://certilas.com/en/product/g3, spec sheet in the attachment. Both AWS A5.2 R60. However, as you can see the compositions still differ and the percentage of some of the materials too. The only thing I’m interested in is that the electrical/magnetic specs match… and for that the iron content is the most important I guess, which will be the majority of the composition (but that would be true too for theR45 material I have now).


        Resistors
        I understand your reasoning, but if I order resistors here, they are specified with a deviation percentage, regardless of the value. Highest accuracy I can get is 470-Ohm +/-0.25%, 0.4W +/-25%, In 0.6W or 1W versions, they come with a +/-0.5% deviation.


        Transistors
        Mine come from ON Semiconductors, from the United States of Trump, sorry America . https://nl.rs-online.com/web/p/bjt-b...stors/7743571/ But if I place my new order at TeslaGenX, I’ll order 8 matched ones from them.


        Diodes
        Just to make sure we’re on the same page, is your naming of the diodes in accordance with how I indicated them in the attachment?
        To match the performance from the setup on your home page is the next step, but my first step is to match your post #29. Can you tell me if during that test you had the isolation diode(s)* installed or not?
        *I installed 2 in parallel as you recommended.


        When the batteries are less than .6 volts apart, which is the forward voltage drop of the output diodes, they don't self-equalize when the negatives are connected together.
        Could you please explain a bit more about the advantage/disadvantage of this isolation diode and/or self equalizing at 0.6V or 1.2V?


        Best regards,
        Rodolphe

        2020-09-25 - Attachment.pdf
        Welding rods - Core material - Certilas - mat. nr. 1.6215 - A5.2 R65 - 8554.G3 -Certificate.pdf
        Welding rods - Core material - Blue Demon - AWS A5.2 spec.pdf
        Attached Files
        Last edited by pearldragon; 09-26-2020, 02:50 AM.

        Comment


        • #94
          Hi Rodolphe,

          I’m a Mechanical Engineer, a contractor. Not so much calculations (I do some), more design, prototyping. I work a lot with the CAD program Solidworks.
          I checked out your web page. Looks like you're also a "Gear Head" like me. LOL

          Did you only ordered the pre-wound coil and ordered the rods yourself?
          Yes, That is correct.

          A bit in doubt whether I understand you or not; you mean grinding the tops of the rods flush with the spool (where the magnets pass by)
          Yes. That is correct as well.

          The only thing I’m interested in is that the electrical/magnetic specs match… and for that the iron content is the most important I guess, which will be the majority of the composition (but that would be true too for theR45 material I have now).
          The R45 and R60 are both meant for welding mild, low carbon, steel. I think either one has about the same very low magnetic retention when used as core material for the coil.

          Resistors
          I understand your reasoning, but if I order resistors here, they are specified with a deviation percentage, regardless of the value. Highest accuracy I can get is 470-Ohm +/-0.25%, 0.4W +/-25%, In 0.6W or 1W versions, they come with a +/-0.5% deviation.
          I think Teslagenx also buys large quantities of resistors and then matches them closely for a set in their kits.

          Diodes
          Just to make sure we’re on the same page, is your naming of the diodes in accordance with how I indicated them in the attachment?
          Yes. That is correct.

          To match the performance from the setup on your home page is the next step, but my first step is to match your post #29. Can you tell me if during that test you had the isolation diode(s)* installed or not?
          Yes. The isolation diode(s) were installed in the test of post #29 just like in your attached drawing.

          Could you please explain a bit more about the advantage/disadvantage of this isolation diode and/or self equalizing at 0.6V or 1.2V?
          Look at your attachment. In generator mode when the transistor is turned off, the supply (run) battery is basically in parallel with the charge battery with the coil winding and charge diode in the circuit path between them. When any two (or more) batteries are in parallel, they always equalize to the same voltage. So if the run battery is at 13.1 volts and the charge battery is at 12.5 volts they will both come to a voltage somewhere in between. This might be 12.8 volts for example, and happens very quickly when there is no resistance in the circuit path between them. The coil is very low resistance so equalization would happen very fast, except that the diodes each have about a .6 volt forward voltage threshold that must be overcome before any current can flow to allow for equalization. When there are two diodes in the circuit then 1.2 volts need to exist between the batteries before any current can flow to equalize them.

          So without the isolation diode self equalization will occur any time the battery voltage difference is between .6 volts and 1.2 volts. That means if the supply (run) battery is at 13.1 volts the charge battery must be 12.5 volts or more to eliminate self equalization and allow for the charge battery voltage to increase only due to coil collapse. With the isolation diode installed, the charge battery could be as low as 11.9 volts without self equalization occurring.

          In the test on my home page the run battery was at 13.08 volts and the charge battery was at 12.58 volts for only a .5 volt difference. So I didn't need the isolation diode, which would have added resistance, and slowed down the charging rate.

          Comment


          • #95
            Hi Gary, RS,
            I mean both. The drag lowers the current draw of a SG/SSG helping to up the COP. A genny coil/coils up's total COP by utilizing the 33% mechanical output of a SG/SSG that is wasted otherwise.
            I have lit Led arrays from genny coils, but using genny coils to feed a cap pulser and charge a 2nd primary input battery is the best use of genny coils out put. I have also used genny coils to cap pulse back pop the primary drive battery momentarily, while the SG/SSG continues to run from a BIG Cap during the back pop. There is a circuit I posted for this here on the forum some where.
            I read some terms here that I’ve seen here on the forum and some of Gary’s threads as well. But for now have not put active effort into it to fully understand it, experiment with it, for the simple reason that I think they are add-ons to the basic system. What I mean is that I first need to find out how to get into the ballpark of Gary’s results of post #29 with just the basic setup, and once I achieve that continue to improve output from there with add-on/modifications like you mention in your post. E.g. While reading through the Advanced Handbook, I ordered a genny coil from a local coil-winder here, but it has been sitting laying on the shelf since it came in because I’m still so far out from Gary’s performance.


            SG = Cap pulser charger / SSG = the direct diode to battery charger
            ok, thanks for explaining that, since the terminology used here on the forum is sometimes a bit confusing, I try to stick with what is described in the manual, just not sure what term you use then for the Radiant stage as it is used in the beginner’s handbook (Radiant mode):
            1) ?? = Radiant charging (Beginner’s Handbook)
            2) SG = Cap pulser charger (Intermediate Handbook)
            3) SSG = the direct diode to battery charger = Common Ground mode (CG) / Generator mode (Advanced Handbook)

            With regards to the technology used in the TeslaGenX charger of our previous posts, I guess then that the technology/charging method used in that is a 2) Cap Pulser charger?

            No, I do not have any TeslagenX SSG PCB's stuffed up, although I do have 1. My designed SSG PCB's are 16 transistors each. With 3 of these for my 6 coil 48 strand/transistor SSG that charged L16 Battery's at 24V, that I described the branched trigger resistor layout in my last post.
            I come back with questions about this once I’ve got my basic setup performing in the ballpark of Gary’s post #29.

            Do you use a auto Lamp in your trigger circuits? That really helps to keep a SG/SSG in tune while a primary battery runs down.... This is a trick that JB ask me to try for him and report back to him on the results, over 6 mo's before he told the rest of the forums about it.
            I’ve built by the handbooks, apart from the neons to protect the transistors I do not have any auto-lamps in my (trigger)-circuit. Can you explain a bit more about this?
            -where exactly is it placed
            -what kind of lamp exactly
            -how does is help to keep the Sg in tune and what do you mean in this context by keeping it in tune?


            I will show pics and video of the new shop soon, when I start putting the Ferris Wheel together inside it.
            Ferris Wheel… bringing out the big guns . Looking forward to see some pics.

            Best regards,
            Rodolphe

            Comment


            • #96
              First, I do not have the Beginner’s Handbook or Intermediate Handbook or Advanced Handbook... Seeing as to I wrote the very first SG/SSG builders guide with some editing help in about 2008 or so...

              1) Radiant charging = SSG = diode direct to the battery: Puts a Negative charge on the battery so that when you try to charge them with a regular charger it takes a LONG Time to eat up the Negative charge, and start charging like normal. Not good as a Primary Run battery. (see Beardens book Energy From the Vacuum on this issue)
              2) SG = Cap pulser charger. Is a Positive Charge. Is good for a Primary Run battery

              Common Ground mode (CG) / Generator mode (Advanced Handbook) not sure on the terms used in this issue, maybe Gary can help here......

              "With regards to the technology used in the TeslaGenX charger of our previous posts, I guess then that the technology/charging method used in that is a 2) Cap Pulser charger?"
              This is correct....

              The auto tail light lamp goes into the trigger circuit right before the POT and acts like a negative resistor... So as the primary battery runs down, and the rpm's decrease it holds the trigger current steady so that the SG/SSG stays in tune. Because the resistance of the filament in the bulb changes resistance as the trigger current changes as the RPM changes. I have found that for most small setups a model 1895 tail light bulb works good. Bigger muilty coil setups need a higher amp bulb.... at first I went to the local auto parts store and bought 1 each of a whole range of amperage tail light lamp/bulbs and traded them out in my setups till i found the right bulb for that build that glowed through the entire range of rpm's and kept the SG/SSG in tune and not drop into double pulsing at the lower run down drive battery voltages.

              Check out the lamp in the trigger circuit below.....

              Comment


              • #97
                Hi Gary, RS,

                Sorry for belated response. I’ve started a new contract job, so will not be as quick with responses/questions as I am when I’m free.

                Thanks for your clarifications/explanations regarding the diodes and there effects regarding equalizing. To double check:

                So without the isolation diode self-equalization will occur any time the battery voltage difference is between .6 volts and 1.2 volts.
                I guess this should read:
                So without the isolation diode self-equalization will occur any time when the input battery is 0.6 volts or more above the voltage of the output battery.
                Correct?


                With the isolation diode installed, the charge battery could be as low as 11.9 volts without self equalization occurring.
                In the test on my home page the run battery was at 13.08 volts and the charge battery was at 12.58 volts for only a .5 volt difference. So I didn't need the isolation diode, which would have added resistance, and slowed down the charging rate.
                So to summarize, the isolation diode is only a safety measure and actually only required when the output battery would be more than 0.6V lower than the input battery.


                For now I’ll keep them in since you had them installed in your test of post #29. If I (finally) are up to that performance level, than I’ll continue with trying to make more modifications/match the results from your website.

                I’ve been e-mailing a bit with TeslaGenX, today have placed an order for:
                -8 matched transistors
                -new pre-wound coil + R60 rods
                - TX-2A12 charger (same you have Gary)
                -some dvds


                They’ve told me that the charger as it standard is might be a bit too much for the small AGMs I have, but might be able to built in a switch to toggle between AGM/Flooded Lead Acid.

                Best regards,
                Rodolphe

                Comment


                • #98
                  Hi Rodolphe,

                  So without the isolation diode self-equalization will occur any time when the input battery is 0.6 volts or more above the voltage of the output battery.
                  Correct?
                  Yes. That is correct.

                  Gary Hammond,

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    Hi Gary, RS,
                    RS, I response to your post #96:

                    Thanks for the image and explanation.

                    It is good that we talked about the thermology of indicating the different modes of operation; I know now which mode you refer to with which term.


                    The auto tail light lamp goes into the trigger circuit right before the POT and acts like a negative resistor... So as the primary battery runs down, and the rpm's decrease it holds the trigger current steady so that the SG/SSG stays in tune. Because the resistance of the filament in the bulb changes resistance as the trigger current changes as the RPM changes.
                    I experienced that during the charging process the RPMs increase, rather than decrease. But I guess the same applies there: if the RPMs increase, the resistance of the bulb increases too.

                    So do I understand correctly from the image/your post that this extra light bulb mod, is done mainly for SSG en SG mode? To prevent the machine front falling back from single pulses to multi-pulsing/firing somewhere down the charging process? But does this really happen? I mean; I’ve looked at the pulses during tuning at the beginning of a charge, cycle, and was not so much paying attention to the end of the cycle; whether it fell back to a double firing/pulsing (when I would start out with a single pulse). But taking into account that the rpms only went up, I assume it did not fall back from single to double pulsing, or from double pulsing to triple pulsing… Then my question is, will this bring an advantage to my machine while using it in SG/SSG mode, or only add extra resistance?

                    As you can read in the initial posts from Gary in this thread, Gary obtained best results in SSG mode with double pulsing, rather than single pulsing.

                    With the tests that I’ve been doing, trying to match Gary, I’ve only worked with in Common Ground (generator) mode, so assume it is of lesser value in that mode anyways, correct? I did experiment with SSG mode before, got some data from it. SG mode I only worked with very briefly. When I got to the CG (generator) mode, I’ve been main concerned with those results.

                    In the image it reads “tune motor to it’s lowers current/highest rpm sweet spot”. In the parts handbooks, when explaining about the SSG/SG mode it talks about this too, but also there I’ve found this a sentence a bit hard to interpret based on my own attempts of tuning: Either I tune it to the lowest amperage input OR to the highest RPM (SSG/SSG mode), but those two do not coincide with the tests of my machine…

                    Best regards,
                    Rodolphe

                    Comment


                    • I had most of a post for you written... Windows just had to update and reboot while i was out doing errands .... The auto save error-ed out and i lost it all..... will try again later

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