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  • Tom C
    replied
    Originally posted by fathershand View Post

    man been lookin for that myself, thanks!!

    Tom C

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  • fathershand
    replied
    Here it is: Espacenet - Bibliographic data

    Leave a comment:


  • John_Koorn
    replied
    Originally posted by Dwane Dibley View Post
    Hi there John K.
    I thought it might have been on the "Energeticenergy" forum archive. However, you need to go to Espacenet and search for Benitez, here are the details:-

    GB Patent number: GB12156(A)
    Publication date : 1918-12-24
    Invertor: Benitez Carlos

    Classification:- International: H02J7/02
    European: H02J7/02B

    Application number:- GB 19180006131 19180410

    When you get to the Espacenet search engine you will understand the reason for all the details above!

    Hope this helps, regards

    Dwane
    Hi Dwane,

    Much appreciated!

    John K.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dwane Dibley
    replied
    Originally posted by John_Koorn View Post
    Hi Dwane,

    Are you able to post a link to the Benitez patent? I've been looking for it for a couple of years with no success.

    John K.
    Hi there John K.
    I thought it might have been on the "Energeticenergy" forum archive. However, you need to go to Espacenet and search for Benitez, here are the details:-

    GB Patent number: GB12156(A)
    Publication date : 1918-12-24
    Invertor: Benitez Carlos

    Classification:- International: H02J7/02
    European: H02J7/02B

    Application number:- GB 19180006131 19180410

    When you get to the Espacenet search engine you will understand the reason for all the details above!

    Hope this helps, regards

    Dwane

    Leave a comment:


  • John_Koorn
    replied
    Originally posted by Dwane Dibley View Post
    Hi guys,
    The reason that not many experimenters get the Tesla Switch going is from a mistaken understanding regarding its operation. First you might like to track down a patent by Carlos Benitez. Its on one of the other "Energy" forums. The switching is very similar to that of the basic TS model that Bedini worked from. The key to understanding this patent and subsequent trials of the TS is the "Pulse" circuit used by Benitez to feed back to his batteries. The other observation you might like to consider is what happens to batteries when current is drawn from them - ultimately they run down. The TS does work and it is essentially a swapping exercise, but not of current drawing batteries, but, energy potential sources!

    Enjoy
    Hi Dwane,

    Are you able to post a link to the Benitez patent? I've been looking for it for a couple of years with no success.

    John K.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dwane Dibley
    replied
    Hi guys,
    The reason that not many experimenters get the Tesla Switch going is from a mistaken understanding regarding its operation. First you might like to track down a patent by Carlos Benitez. Its on one of the other "Energy" forums. The switching is very similar to that of the basic TS model that Bedini worked from. The key to understanding this patent and subsequent trials of the TS is the "Pulse" circuit used by Benitez to feed back to his batteries. The other observation you might like to consider is what happens to batteries when current is drawn from them - ultimately they run down. The TS does work and it is essentially a swapping exercise, but not of current drawing batteries, but, energy potential sources!

    Enjoy

    Leave a comment:


  • ZPDM
    replied
    Hi Aram,

    I've spent maybe a total of an hour looking at the Tesla Switch since I first heard of it some time back. I am at a bit of a disadvantage having little electronics experience and less formal education. Didn't feel I was at a level to attempt a reproduction of this project at least a this point. Still I'll throw in my two cents on what I guess is conceptually going on from a Bedini/Bearden framework. You may already agree with all this, don't know. Both Bedini and Bearden speak of the overriding importance of the potential versus the current. Bearden notes explicity you can regauge the potential without any cost. Yes, the switching apparently allows for a brief period of time when pure potential can do work before the secondary effect of current flow works to cancels the dipole. However if there was no potential difference in various parts of circuit this would not allow for useful work. Bedini mentions in the Tesla Switch write up that Robert Darrah linked, "did you ever try and charge two capacitors (*in parralel*) then discharge them in series into a battery" or something to that effect. So it is the higher potential (the regauging of potential) by discharging in series that allows for slightly more "negative energy" to flow in during the brief time that the dipole is preserved. I sort of think of the potential as a pressure, it can be made very high (at no cost) and for the brief time before current corrects/changes the situation negative energy will flow in proportional to the amount of potential. Tesla in one of his early patents also says this that what is important is the voltage and the pulse rate. Also one would need an abrupt switch as with a spark gap or some such to allow the neccessary disequilibrium or asymmetry to occur before current destroys the dipole. So the two things that determine the amount of negative energy from each pulse are the potential and the abruptness of the switch, while the switching rate determines the amount of power per time. Finally, if we are going to consider energy as a wave, then there could be resonance and/or complicated interference effects which might be expected to come into play at certain frequencies.

    All that said, and again I have no actual experience in this project, I would wonder whether adding a third battery in the series part (i.e. four total batteries three in discharing in series) would further improve performance). Don't know how complicated this would be from a switching standpoint, but you would now have a greater potential difference from the series part of the circuit. Alternatively I would have to wonder what three very small farad 1KV capacitors might do. Anyways sounds like you are making great progress on this interesting project and hope to hear about further progress when you find a bit of free time!
    Last edited by ZPDM; 01-06-2013, 07:15 PM.

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  • fathershand
    replied
    Aram, are you still working on this? Why does Matt have us taking apart a transformer? Do you have part 2 of his pdf on this?
    Thanks
    Tony

    Leave a comment:


  • Aram
    replied
    Tesla Switch test runs - YouTube

    Somebody was asking for diagrams on youtube. I'm not going to post that on youtube, even though the video is hidden.

    BUT a google search of the right words will result in you finding this: http://www.overunityresearch.com/ind....0;attach=6143

    Which I'm using the third design with the optos.

    Oh, and not exactly following the diagram, using the same arrangement with a diode and cap to trigger shown on the scalar charge John K linked, and I'm using an Arduino, not a stack2e or whatever.
    Last edited by Aram; 09-25-2012, 12:51 PM.

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  • fathershand
    replied
    Have you seen this pdf?
    http://www.scene.org/~esa/merlib/Mueller.pdf

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  • Aram
    replied
    Use for the Tesla Switch

    Starts getting interesting about page 100. I do intend to put up a vid, when I have some of my basic problems fixed. But learning from me would be like the blind leading the blind. Besides, I don't like talking about my mistakes. . . lol

    And in reply to your follow up message below, yes I have a copy, but thanks for linking it.
    Last edited by Aram; 09-21-2012, 10:29 PM.

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  • fathershand
    replied
    Aram, Can you take a picture of your TS setup? Maybe you could put a video on Youtube? How about a description of components and schematic? I would like to learn from your progress and mistakes.
    Thanks
    Tony

    Leave a comment:


  • Aram
    replied
    Yes it works. You can switch it using a quad pole, double throw switch (break before make is very important), or wire it manually one way, and then the other. The output is not AC (so forget about the caps), obviously but you will end up with fairly close to 12 v DC. My expiments with that showed the recieving batteries went to 15-16 volts in very short order, at which point they're not accepting any more charge, and you're wasting energy. And I didn't really feel like sitting there flipping a switch every few seconds, plus I think a normal switch would probably wear out fairly quickly due to arcing.

    All I did was get 4 batteries and a bunch of alligator clip wires, and put a lightbulb as the load, no rectifier (light bulb don't care which way the current flows), and wired it up manually, stuck a current meter in between different points, measured potential. Knock yourself out.

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  • fathershand
    replied
    Thanks for sharing your insights about the SSG. I want to focus on the Tesla Switch also. I was just trying to see if there was a way to modify the SSG to get the effect of a Tesla switch.

    In the Free Energy Devices ebook, that you referenced, he mentions that manually connecting the batteries back and forth from 12V to 24V and a load in between, will work. Have you tested that theory? I believe that he leaves the battery 1 and 2 connected for a while in series and then swaps them to replace batteries 3 and 4 where are in parallel. Does that work, i.e., cause the load to be powered and at the same time charge up one set of batteries?

    Thanks
    Tony

    Leave a comment:


  • Aram
    replied
    If you're having a hard time getting the SSG to work, don't even bother with the Tesla switch yet. It's much more difficult.

    I have built 10 SSG's, two wheel based, several solid state with different triggers, some of the joule ringer types, one of the kits from R-charge, and a PC fan, my first was the Imhotep relay version. Each one works, and charges very well as long as you match the battery size to the charger power. I don't define my success by COP > 1. But I will tell you this, every SSG charger I've built works better than a traditional charger, and will keep the battery it charges working well rather than sulfate it.

    The difference between what Bearden is talking about and the SSG is that the SSG circuit is still connected for a short time period, allowing the current to flow to charge the coil. Bearden is talking about something that requires no closed circuit ever. Anyway, I have to focus on one thing at a time, or I get nothing done. Tesla switch is my focus right now.

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