Bedini RPX Sideband Generator

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Thread: "Enhanced Generator" from JPKBook

  1. #101
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Sussex and Cornwall, England
    Posts
    71

    Extracting >500W from a solid state generator

    Hi all,

    Recently I have been pondering and playing with various designs and configurations to allow upwards of 1000W to be drawn from a high frequency (>1kHz) HV pulse solid state device. The problem is that if a suitable inverter is being supplied from a 12V battery then the current demand to supply 1000W is going to be of the order of 83A. The use of a capacitor here is helpful, for not only does it translate the radiant energy to its 'positive' form but it benefits from the 'electret' effect. Even so, when the capacitor supplies current to the inverter it is going to have to deliver the very high amperage to provide the power.

    My suggestion at this stage is shown in the 'Battery Config 3' pic. Here I have increased the number of batters to 4 offering 48V to the inverter and reducing the current drawn to 25% of that at 12V so 1kW will be approaching 21A. The voltage across the 10uf capacitor is anchored to 48V by the batteries and supplies the current to the inverter. If the voltage on the capacitor rises above 48V, for example when the inverter is not drawing any power, then it passes that energy to the battery stack via the three diodes. Note that the battery stack itself cannot deliver any power to the inverter through the reversed bias diodes. This is a test that the 'developer' has done to confirm that the LEDs that he used as the load, were being powered only by the HV and not using any battery power.

    The circuit itself then draws its power from either a Buck Converter fed from the 48V stack, or by a direct feed from the bottom 12V battery in the stack. Which option is best would depend on how the back feed through the diodes was distributed amongst the batteries.

    Any thoughts about this suggestion would be appreciated.

    Jules
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  2. #102
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Sussex and Cornwall, England
    Posts
    71

    Rotor generator and revised battery swapper

    Hi all,

    I wanted to update on the modifications I have made to the rotor based system with the addition of an effective battery swapper. When I built and installed the first one, it was found that both batteries had some current drain all the time and that was to feed either the transistor bases or the timer and relay circuit, even though the main coil current was alternated. So I revised the design so that each battery is fully in either charge or discharge mode. This included the use of a 39,000uf capacitor to supply the timer and relay circuit during the relay's brief switch over. The swap time is set to 30 seconds and this revised circuit is attached as 'Battery Swapper (Revised)'. I also have a 3 min video of the whole generator running at: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/kjcs6exru...YqrlyIyWa?dl=0

    As I say in the video, the rotor speed may be pivotal in delivering the required rate of pulses to keep the system self sustaining and to power an additional external load although I doubt these things behave in a logical manner. The break point for self running I believe to be about 1,400 rpm in my case, that's about 117Hz HV pulses. Freshly lubricating the bearing can help there but in an ideal world I would substitute the ball bearing from the type used in computer hard drives that have much less friction.

    I also attach the schematic for a solid state version I am building that uses 7 coils, each being fed from a timer and cascade circuit with preset timer periods resulting in HV pulse frequencies ranging from 500 - 3,500Hz but easily changeable to much higher values. Given the need to operate with 12V lead acid batteries, and the potential for high output currents for the inverter, I am running with 36V and using an electromechanical relay for the battery swapper. A buck converter is then required to provide suitable voltages to the main circuit.

    I will update here when I have something more substantial to show.

    Jules
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #103
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Sussex and Cornwall, England
    Posts
    71
    Hi Gregory,

    I went to look at the 10kW household generator at your site but there's just the title and no details? What type of generator is it and what principles is it using?

    Jules

  4. #104
    Hi julesP, I have also just yesterday continued testing with this type of setup, was working on a heater previously.

    I am using only one bifilar coil/core as drive and the other 3 coil/cores as separate generator coils in series.

    Using that generator output to light a 12 volt led bulb off a full wave bridge with large 1.5 farad car audio capacitor to smooth output to the bulb, other wise it flickers a little.

    I'm doing this to place a mechanical load on the device, to then see if the batteries can still maintain voltage and charge over time.

    It is using .42 amps in this configuration, using the same 12 volt tractor batteries, running for an hour, letting rest for awhile, then swapping.

    peace love light
    Last edited by SkyWatcher; 11-11-2018 at 11:02 AM.

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