Bedini RPX Sideband Generator

* NEW * BEDINI RPX BOOK & DVD SET: BEDINI RPX


2019 ESTC ALL SEATS SOLD OUT!
PRE-REGISTER FOR THE
2020 ENERGY CONFERENCE

Monero XMR

Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 75

Thread: Ron Cole's Bipolar Switch

  1. #11
    Senior Member John_Koorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    1,077
    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Hammond View Post
    Hi John,

    Well, I dug out my old circuit from the pile on the bench and reinstalled the missing cap and 2n2222 transistors. Fired it up with the scope attached, and was able to balance the square wave pulses 50/50 at 109 HZ.

    I had used as many of the originally specified parts as I could obtain at the time I built it. I did, however, subsitute a fixed resistor for the 10K pot in the schematic. And used two 5K pots on the 555 timer instead of two fixed resistors to control duty cycle and frequency. I'm not using the auxillary 9 volt battery, but instead the main battery is powering the chips directly and is regulated by the 10 volt zenier as also shown in the schematic. The current draw for the timing circuit is 34 ma regardless of load through the caps. And the frequency is very stable as well.

    I played around with three different loads to start. The battery is a 5.5 AH SLAB that was standing at 13.1 volts initially. After tuning and trying various loads the battery is setting at 12.95 volts with a total current draw of 60 ma.

    Load 1 .....The slot car motor as load ran at part speed, but was pulling the battery down too quickly. I didn't take any other measurments with this load as I wanted to conserve the battery.

    Load 2 ......The 25 LED TeslagenX panel was allowing 46 ma @ .516 volts through and dimmly lighting up. With this load the cap voltages were one at 8.16 volts and the other one at 8.24 volts on the scope. Battery voltage was 12.93 with this load. (Total current draw on the battery was 80 ma.)

    Load 3 ......The 5 LED TeslagenX panel was allowing 27 ma @ 5.47 volts through and lighting up much better. With this load the cap voltages were both at 4.96 volts. Battery voltage is 12.95 and total current draw from the battery measures 60 ma. This load seems to give the best balance between all the voltages, so this is the way I'll let it run for a few days to see what happens to the battery!
    Hi Gary,

    Glad to hear your circuit is working. Curious to know if you have a rectifier before your loads you have tried, as they are all DC loads.

    John K.

  2. #12
    Senior Member John_Koorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    1,077
    Quote Originally Posted by RS_ View Post
    Hi all,

    MOSFETS are VERY hard to get to work in this R.C. bipolar switch, and the Tesla switch, because it is hard to bias the gate voltage high enough, so that they turn on correctly. Transistors work much easier because they are current turn on and not voltage turn on.....

    have built both of these circuits way back in the day.......... and they do work........
    Hi RS_,

    I've noticed the same with the Tesla Switch - cannot get it to work for the life of me with MOSFETs. However, I'm definitely not a MOSFET guru either.

    I'd love to see how Faraday got his to work with them.

    John K.

  3. #13
    Hi John,

    Quote Originally Posted by John_Koorn View Post
    Hi Gary,

    Glad to hear your circuit is working. Curious to know if you have a rectifier before your loads you have tried, as they are all DC loads.

    John K.
    The LEDs are rectifiers themselves. So no, ......no additional rectifiers. Since it's pulsed, square wave DC, I don't think any rectifiers are needed. It also runs the small DC slot car motor just fine (directly, no diodes) except it's too big a load for the battery I'm using. And the run voltage on the battery has dropped from 12.95 to 12.85 in the past six hours with the 5 panel LED board as load. So, ............ no magic here!

    Edit: I see I made a wrong assumption here! The LEDs were blocking any reverse (charging) flow and giving only a draw down on the battery. The wave form was all below the battery voltage this way. Once I changed to an incadessant bulb the wave form increased and a portion of it was above battery voltage. This would indicate some charging effect. Please excuse my ignorance - I'm kind of a slow learner!
    Last edited by Gary Hammond; 09-28-2015 at 05:49 PM.
    Gary Hammond,

  4. #14
    Hi RS,

    Quote Originally Posted by RS_ View Post
    Hi all,

    .....

    have built both of these circuits way back in the day.......... and they do work........
    When you say they work, do you mean that you got them to keep the batteries charged?
    Gary Hammond,

  5. #15
    Yes, both of these circuits will charge the battery's while running a very small load....., with small SLA's and a small auto tail light for the DC Load....... on the TS I tried every size tail light bulb i had handy, (Lots!!) only the one bulb size worked with that size battery.... did not work with bigger SLA's and no other size or type of load (DC Motor's, SG's, etc....)
    The RC bipolar switch had a different size bulb it liked, but was not as bad, as couple of sizes worked, and other sizes of batteries worked .....

    don't remember the freq i ran them at that worked, but i tested them over a very wide range......

    I used the same set of my 4 opto PCB's for both of these TS and RC-BP builds. and now all the caps and batterys were used else where for other projects.
    On the Ron Cole Bipolar SW, i even had it filling 3 caps in parallel and dumping them in series back to the battery. tryed 4 caps but never got that to work for some reason, and other projects came along.....

    The set of PCB's for that project are here in a draw some place
    Last edited by RS_; 09-28-2015 at 05:36 PM.

  6. #16
    Thanks RS,

    That's good to know!

    Quote Originally Posted by RS_ View Post
    Yes, both of these circuits will charge the battery's while running a very small load....., with small SLA's and a small auto tail light for the DC Load....... on the TS I tried every size tail light bulb i had handy, (Lots!!) only the one bulb size worked with that size battery.... did not work with bigger SLA's and no other size or type of load (DC Motor's, SG's, etc....)
    The RC bipolar switch had a different size bulb it liked, but was not as bad, as couple of sizes worked

    don't remember the freq i ran them at that worked, but i tested them over a very wide range......

    I used the same set of my 4 opto PCB's for both of these TS and RC-BP builds. and now all the caps and batterys were used else where for other projects.

    The set of PCB's for that project are here in a draw some place
    And I discovered that I made a bad assumption in my previous post about the output from the bipolar switch! The LEDs were indeed rectifying the output. The entire wave form was at a lower voltage than the battery positive. But when I replace the LED panel with an incadessant bulb, part of the wave form is now above the battery positive indicating some charging effect. And the wave form has more total voltage!

    I was clipping the wave and killing any charge back into the battery. Now I need to find the correct resistance to center the wave form on the battery positive voltage. I'm kind of a slow learner. LOL
    Last edited by Gary Hammond; 09-28-2015 at 07:21 PM.
    Gary Hammond,

  7. #17
    Senior Member Faraday88's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Bangaluru, Karnataka, India
    Posts
    1,529
    Hi John,

    Sure! in fact i'm in process of aggregating all of the topology on the Tesla switch based on what I call as the OCTRANT ('8') representation of Radiant Electricity, similar to Eric's 4 quadrant interpretation. this would give us a clear picture of what is happening in each and how they all are co-related.
    shall share the findings once ready.
    best regards,
    Faraday88.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Faraday88's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Bangaluru, Karnataka, India
    Posts
    1,529
    Quote Originally Posted by John_Koorn View Post
    Hi Gary,

    Yes, RL is "resistive load". The bulb I'm using is good as I can see the effects pretty quickly.

    I'd really recommend using a scope (doesn't have to be fancy) so you can ensure the circuit is switching properly. Run it at low frequency first until you're satisfied it's working correctly.

    Test the output of the 555 timer, then make sure the optos are working right, then the transistors after the optos. After you're satisfied, scope the RL and you should see an AC square wave.

    Your tuning is the 555 frequency (the resistor between pins 2 & 7 and the capacitor between pins 1 & 2) and the 10k pot as shown in the diagram.

    5 gold stars to who can tell me what that does

    John K.
    Hi John,
    My Guess is on the duty cycle which has to be high i.e high ON time and Low OFF time... This in combination with the Double Inversion after the pin 3 of the 555 is the key..
    We are simulating Magneto electric wave (Sine wave ) across the Load.
    Rgds,
    Faraday88

  9. #19
    Senior Member John_Koorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    1,077
    Good to see a fair bit of activity on this thread ��

    Rather than attempt to quote posts I'll just make it up as I go along.

    @Gary, better to be a slow learner than no learner at all! So, you obviously figured out that like the TS the current goes both ways. Like I said, it's square wave AC we are playing with. The caps charge in parallel through the load and then they discharge is series through the same load.

    @RS_, sounds like you got some pretty good results with your build. Way to go!

    @Faraday88, yes you get the stars! In my build the 10k pot is used to adjust the duty cycle which tends to wander when you adjust the 555 frequency. And yes, you need more time to charge the caps than to discharge them. I'm looking forward to your findings, but to be honest mate the stuff about OCTRANTS is mumbo jumbo to me.
    No disprepect intended but can you just post your MOSFET version of the circuit? If you post it I will build it ��

    ok, so my theory on the circuit is pretty simple. You charge the caps in parallel to the battery voltage minus the voltage drop of the load and then you discharge the caps in series through the load at around double the battery voltage.
    Any normal person would look at it and say you're just putting the same energy back into the battery minus load and the switching losses and therefore over time you will lose and the battery will die. I get that.

    But there is more to it than that. Back later.

    John K.

  10. #20
    Senior Member Faraday88's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Bangaluru, Karnataka, India
    Posts
    1,529
    Quote Originally Posted by John_Koorn View Post
    Good to see a fair bit of activity on this thread ��

    Rather than attempt to quote posts I'll just make it up as I go along.

    @Gary, better to be a slow learner than no learner at all! So, you obviously figured out that like the TS the current goes both ways. Like I said, it's square wave AC we are playing with. The caps charge in parallel through the load and then they discharge is series through the same load.

    @RS_, sounds like you got some pretty good results with your build. Way to go!

    @Faraday88, yes you get the stars! In my build the 10k pot is used to adjust the duty cycle which tends to wander when you adjust the 555 frequency. And yes, you need more time to charge the caps than to discharge them. I'm looking forward to your findings, but to be honest mate the stuff about OCTRANTS is mumbo jumbo to me.
    No disprepect intended but can you just post your MOSFET version of the circuit? If you post it I will build it ��

    ok, so my theory on the circuit is pretty simple. You charge the caps in parallel to the battery voltage minus the voltage drop of the load and then you discharge the caps in series through the load at around double the battery voltage.
    Any normal person would look at it and say you're just putting the same energy back into the battery minus load and the switching losses and therefore over time you will lose and the battery will die. I get that.

    But there is more to it than that. Back later.

    John K.
    Hi John,

    Thanks again for your appreciations, while i also appreciate your approach on being more practical and not interested in the Mombo jombo part (Theory), I look at it this way,I do not proceed until i understand the beauty of the process/ Phenomenon under study. as i also said in my early post that there are more potential iterations of this circuit.
    but what you pointed out is the key. While i insist that MOSFETS were not around when Ron originally built the circuit, i do'nt see why this cannot be used, at least the POWER SWITCH part of the circuit. again the hard part would be to use a P-Channel MOSFET (counter part of PNP in BJTs).
    Rgds,
    Faraday88.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •