Bedini RPX Sideband Generator

* NEW * BEDINI RPX BOOK & DVD SET: BEDINI RPX


2019 ESTC ALL SEATS SOLD OUT!
PRE-REGISTER FOR THE
2020 ENERGY CONFERENCE

Monero XMR

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24

Thread: Having fun with my first Bedini

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Jax Beach, Florida
    Posts
    11

    Having fun with my first Bedini

    After watching a bazillion youtubes and looking at circuits, I decided to give it a try. I really enjoy learning and since I stumbled onto this Bedini motor thing...I have been having a blast... The problem is I tend to be frugal and like to reuse stuff. I tore up a bunch of old electronics laying around and found resistors, diodes, and transistors I thought would work...I am not an electrician but get some of the concepts. I am a developer of code and this has been quite a challenge...but a fun one.

    Tonight, after a ton of trial and error over a period of a month... and learning the hard way that PNP is NOT NPN...lol..the motor took off...I charged 3 of my Ryobi batteries up from one 18 volt...is that even possible??? Still amazed the thing runs so well.

    I did notice the neon coming on at times and I would check the charge battery to see if it was still connected...the Ryobi batteries are hard to get a solid connect to...I need to build something perhaps out of an old charger.

    My question is centered on these batteries...I see most folks are referencing deep cycle 12 volts...some six volts too. Am I endangering my livelihood with these 18V NiCad and Lithium on the charger? If I blow something up or catch my house on fire...well..then the having so much fun part kinda stops?....seriously tho...are these ok to experiment with?

    Appreciate all and any advice...

    CB

  2. #2
    Senior Member James McDonald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Odenton, Maryland
    Posts
    130
    Quote Originally Posted by cbroad View Post

    My question is centered on these batteries...I see most folks are referencing deep cycle 12 volts...some six volts too. Am I endangering my livelihood with these 18V NiCad and Lithium on the charger? If I blow something up or catch my house on fire...well..then the having so much fun part kinda stops?....seriously tho...are these ok to experiment with?

    Appreciate all and any advice...

    CB
    Hi CB --

    The SG Machine is really meant for rejuvenation of dead lead acid type batteries. The SG Machine can also be
    used to pre-condition a new lead acid battery to take on radiant charging. Repeat charging after the rejuvenation or
    preconditioning time period can damage the life of the battery. You need to add a capacitor dump circuit to avoid
    damage to batteries already rejuvenated or preconditioned.

    On the subject of charging NiCad or Lithium batteries with the SG Machine you could cause those types of batteries
    to blow up and or cause a fire. Its not recommended to charge these types of batteries with a radiant spike voltage which
    could be a couple hundred volts. Due to the SG Machine's having an output voltage equivalent to an AC signal you can add
    a full wave bridge rectifier circuit with capacitors to smooth out the AC ripple then add a DC regulator of a size depending
    on the voltage of the battery being charged. If your experimenting gets to the point of wanting to build a better operating
    SG Machine then take a look at this web site listed below for parts.

    http://www.teslagenx.com

    Keep up the experimenting but be safe.

    -- James

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by cbroad View Post
    After watching a bazillion youtubes and looking at circuits, I decided to give it a try. I really enjoy learning and since I stumbled onto this Bedini motor thing...I have been having a blast... The problem is I tend to be frugal and like to reuse stuff. I tore up a bunch of old electronics laying around and found resistors, diodes, and transistors I thought would work...I am not an electrician but get some of the concepts. I am a developer of code and this has been quite a challenge...but a fun one.

    Tonight, after a ton of trial and error over a period of a month... and learning the hard way that PNP is NOT NPN...lol..the motor took off...I charged 3 of my Ryobi batteries up from one 18 volt...is that even possible??? Still amazed the thing runs so well.

    I did notice the neon coming on at times and I would check the charge battery to see if it was still connected...the Ryobi batteries are hard to get a solid connect to...I need to build something perhaps out of an old charger.

    My question is centered on these batteries...I see most folks are referencing deep cycle 12 volts...some six volts too. Am I endangering my livelihood with these 18V NiCad and Lithium on the charger? If I blow something up or catch my house on fire...well..then the having so much fun part kinda stops?....seriously tho...are these ok to experiment with?

    Appreciate all and any advice...

    CB
    Really amazing first post on the board. Keep going on like this.

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Jax Beach, Florida
    Posts
    11

    Appreciate the information.

    James,

    Thanks for the warning and the information. I am now experimenting on a sealed 12v lead acid battery that was in my garage door opener. It was supposed to keep the opener functioning in a power outage but was always uncharged due to either the mechanism in the opener or the battery itself...it showed very little voltage and I removed it years ago.

    So much to learn and little time during the work week. I moved everything to a breadboard to help understand the circuit and make interchanging simpler. It took some time to correctly re-create what I had done previously using the "Daftman template" in a piece of wood with small brads and solder. Nice way to learn, but not very efficient.

    My goal is to go solar. I have a solar hot water unit and am looking to incrementally add electric panels. I estimate 30-35 panels to reach even with the power company. Originally, I planned to grid tie using an automated system as there is plenty of sun here in FL. Everyone (in the solar world here) said batteries were messy and too much maintenance.

    I believe a properly built SG could be a game changer by providing the ability to easily supplement and maintain the storage levels. Again, this is all pretty new to me...but extremely interesting.

    Thanks for the link as well...for now I like learning by building...when I move to the real phase of implementing this...those will be a part of my build, for sure.

    Thanks again.

  5. #5
    Keep in mind that that battery from the door opener is probably a sealed lead acid and it will dry out quickly if your not careful with it. The issue is that using this tech we generally bring the batteries up to 15+V but the electrolyte starts to gas at about 14.8. Doing this over and over will gas off all the electrolyte. You can use SLA's but it can be tricky, i have some big ones I have used for years.

    If you decide to invest any money into the project I would suggest a pair of small garden tractor batteries of the flooded variety so you can keep topping them off. You can also use discarded auto batteries and bring them back to life if you want to give that a try. It is better for a beginner to have some known good batteries though so you know your not fighting a battery problem when tuning the machine and learning how to run it.

    NI-CD and others can be charged with these devices but as James said it can be risky. I charge my 9v ni-mh batteries all the time with a single transistor solid state setup i built. Those same batteries have been in daily use for 2 years roughly and work as good now as they ever did. I would not throw them on a bike wheel setup though. Much of this is about scaling your charger to your load. I also charged up many ni-cd cells that I pulled from old drill batteries. Those can take a lot of abuse but the risky ones are the lithium cells, I would not recommend fooling with those.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Jax Beach, Florida
    Posts
    11

    Batteries

    I was actually looking at a couple of these for around 80 bucks apiece...LiFePO4 Battery: 12V 9Ah...i read on here that they are considered Bedini friendly....you have worked with them as well?

  7. #7
    For LifePO4 there are two opinions out there. One says they work great and the other that they cannot handle the repeated high voltage pulses very well.

    I have two 20AH LifePO4 batteries which I did test some charging on with a mode one setup. They did charge and seemed to like it ok but Tom said that Mr. Bedini himself said that they will not stand up too it. Tom correct me if I am wrong.

    So yes you can charge them and it works well BUT over a long duration it is likely to degrade the cells. I charge mine up on a tracker5 3A and a 50 watt solar panel. The batteries themselves are great but very expensive. I charge mine with solar and then use them to run a USB charger for charging all my USB devices. Pretty much all of my stuff, flashlights, phone, bluetooth speaker, electronic cigarettes,, all my small stuff is charged this way.

    If I were you I really would just start out with some garden tractor batteries. They are much more forgiving than any other type and you can refill the electrolyte. After you get a feel for tuning you can go with more exotic types of cells.
    Last edited by BobZilla; 07-28-2015 at 02:48 PM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Tom C's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    1,888
    that is correct Bob, they don't like the pulse charge. I had one in my hand last time I was there, it was a baby rattle...... its like a straight lithium ion battery in that respect. apparently the pulse blows the plates apart. they like pure DC current. I would rather not experiment with mine. I have run them on the primary side of my SG, but they behaved really funny afterwards. took a couple of cycles on a regular charger before it was happy again.

    Tom C


    experimental Kits, chargers and solar trackers

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Jax Beach, Florida
    Posts
    11

    Potentiometer Troubles

    Once again, thx...garden tractor variety it is...will continue to process what I learn...and hopefully not be a drain on the board with too many questions. I am having an issue with pots as they seem to fry on me.

    I can hear the coil oscillating as I tune it while the rotor is moving. I use a 1k pot and was swapping out resistors to see how it responded. I tried 10, 100 and 470ohm and was finding the place where less amperage and more charge were evident. Now the rotor only reacts when the pot is rotated all the way to the right with any resistor...I get a little play back to the left but too far causes it to spark and the rotor stops...I suppose it is fried....got another and fried it as well...they work fine but perhaps one of the resistors was too far out of impedance?

    It is like wide open or dead now.

    I should have studied electronics...it is fascinating.

  10. #10
    Try putting another resistor before your pot, preferably a heavy duty like 1 or two watt of maybe 100 - 200 Ohm. You do not need to be exact because the pot can adjust for it. You may also want to put a lightbulb in the path too, a small one like for a flashlight. It will do many things but to keep it simple it is going to act as a variable self adjusting resistor. Under normal operation you do not want to see it light up, not what it's there for but if your pushing too hard it will light up and perhaps save your pot and transistors.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •