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Thread: Tesla Node

  1. #1
    Senior Member Tom C's Avatar
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    Tesla Node

    Hi everyone,

    In JB's DVD on Tesla"s impulse technology, He talks about putting "nodes" into the charge battery positive to pic off the spikes. this consists of an inductor in series across the positive cable with a FWBR attached to either side of the leads of the inductor then the output of the FWBR to a cap or battery. anyone done this besides me,I have not had much luck with many different sized inductors
    tesla node.jpg

    Tom C


    experimental Kits, chargers and solar trackers

  2. #2
    Hi Tom,

    This is something I have tinkered with briefly, but I'd like to try again shortly. I asked JB a question about it in another thread, in reference to his diagram on the Tesla page. On there he labels the inductance of the node @ 1.3mH from memory but I wanted to know the specs of the main coil, which would seem to be 11 filar. I have a 16 pole rotor I'd like to convert to a scalar configuration and test this circuit as close to the diagram as possible.

    I could be wrong but I believe there needs to be the correct relationship between coils for the node to really perform.
    Glad to see someone else pondering this too.

    Regards

  3. #3
    Tom and Ren,

    Beingone that has little money and time I build from scrap mainly,sure I have tried it. How could I resist after seeing John show and explainit in detail. I used both a custom (hand wind) setup and also the Imhotep/Bedini Fans setup. Both worked equally well. However I did notice that the charged battery refused to take any real charge without boiling to certain death after this. I did not drain them to 0 volts as John suggested. Oh well,it was just a learning tool but the charge seemed to be oddly...STRONG. Without meters connected it was hard to tell the battery should be dead and was becoming damaged. They showed 5-6 volts and were still running 12 volt lights.

    I was also able to give a small charge to a DRY SLA that NOTHING could charge. I gave them to my buddy and he took them apart because he wanted to try and make it better. What a mistake. Ended up in the trash as most of his ideas do. My mistake because I just bought a "kit" and felt they were not needed anymore.

    John H

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom C View Post
    Hi everyone,

    In JB's DVD on Tesla"s impulse technology, He talks about putting "nodes" into the charge battery positive to pic off the spikes. this consists of an inductor in series across the positive cable with a FWBR attached to either side of the leads of the inductor then the output of the FWBR to a cap or battery. anyone done this besides me,I have not had much luck with many different sized inductors
    tesla node.jpg

    Tom C
    Hi Tom,

    While I don't have a lot of experiments under my belt at all, I can say that coincidently this conceptual area is one that I have paid a lot of attention to the past couple to few months. What I would say, and ask you to look into yourself, is that a FWBR across a "Tesla Node" is an example of one wire transmission of power. And, more specifically, if you measure the power from such a set-up and compare it with the power gathered by a one wire set-up using an Avremenko plug off one end of the inductor they are (basically within the same ballpark) the same. I am a truely terrible artist and this is my first attempt at a diagram however I'll try to provide some captions to further illustrate my thinking 1.jpg. So in the upper left is the set-up you describe with a FWBR across an inductor, (this one not in series -though it could be-, just right off a transformer). G stands for pulsed DC generator. To the right is a close up of the rectifier and how an Avremenko plug relates to this. Next below to the left is how one might use two apposed diodes -an Avremenko plug- to "rectify" things into positive and negative. In my experience the time to charge a specific capacitor using either the Avremenko or FWBR approach is about the same. In the lower right I note that just as Bedini points out that you can get some more power by putting inductors in series and continuing to harvest with FWBRs, you can also split things again with more diodes to improve COP.

    I am by no means a Tesla expert, would not even call myself an afficiando yet, however, the first public discussion I know of about one wire transmission of power was Tesla's 1891 discussion of a new system for electrical lighting Nikola Tesla's "System of Electric Lighting", I enjoyed that write-up.

    Paul

  5. #5
    I have also had the same experience in this field as ren. I was able to rectify a trifiler just like your diagram but through all three conductors. i actually almost made a self runner sending the energy back to the primary. I noticed it took several hours off of my discharge time. i would add the diode drawn at the top of your page to the transistor on my ssg and grounded it through the negative of my run battery.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom C View Post
    Hi everyone,

    In JB's DVD on Tesla"s impulse technology, He talks about putting "nodes" into the charge battery positive to pic off the spikes. this consists of an inductor in series across the positive cable with a FWBR attached to either side of the leads of the inductor then the output of the FWBR to a cap or battery. anyone done this besides me,I have not had much luck with many different sized inductors
    tesla node.jpg

    Tom C
    Hi Tom,

    Have you seen this??
    Part1 Joule Thief - Extra Light - 0 Extra Amp Draw - YouTube
    and this
    Part 2
    Joule Thief - Extra Light - 0 Extra Amp Draw V2 no PSU - YouTube
    They are LED's but later on I played around with charging batteries across the coils with similar results.

    Henry, Hertz, Ohm, Lenz, all the big boys come to play with the node application but after the 20khz or close to there threshold the math for those laws seems to fall apart or morph into a new beast so to say. I have not played around with anything above 20k yet apart from the odd accidental unit that resonates in an unknown frequency that my multimeter cannot measure.

    I have a few more on that channel but I called it Tesla one wire as John calls it in his "Tesla Impulse Technology" video.
    It is we who must seek the Truth of the universe, to walk the path of enlightenment.

  7. #7
    Tom

    Now that you mention it, I did do something like this with some success. I posted my results in the "contests" section of the old yahoo bedini3 groups (the 3pm contest prior to the 2nd convention).

    I charged a small, non-polarized cap with one wire and two diodes (half wave rectifier).

    (I'm not in front of my notes and working from memory... I can dig out my notes when I return in a few days, if you need more info)

    Using the stock SSG circuit (in this case, one of the coils on my 3pm), I removed the charge battery from the circuit.

    I attached two diodes to the collector of the transistor (the place where the spikes are harvested), one diode forward and one backward (i.e. one anode to the collector, the other cathode to the collector).

    The other ends of the diodes were connected to opposite ends of the cap. The cap was "hanging in mid air" attached to the collector only via the two opposing diodes tied on one wire from the collector.

    one-wire.JPG

    The cap charged to a low, but statistically significant, voltage (+3V on a 0.33uF cap, iirc). I confirmed that no such charging was being caused by the meter or "ambient" sources (nothing more than millivolts charge on the cap without this arrangement).

    pt

  8. #8
    Senior Member Faraday88's Avatar
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    Hi All,
    Refer the circuit schematic on John's pages on Telsa Here (Welcome to John Bedini), look care fully what the schematic is doing... it is charging a battery plus a Capacitor as well...
    two bridges involved, see the function of the Inductor in series to the Bridge input at the Capacitor charge side.
    do you all get it now..'Impulse Charging" each component is a Node.
    rgds,
    Faraday88.

  9. #9
    My one-wire config, again

    one-wire.JPG
    Last edited by pault; 11-07-2012 at 10:43 PM.

  10. #10
    @Tom C.

    I have done some experimenting with nodes... And it is still ongoing. The 3pole monopole kit (converted to 6 pole) has been my experimental platform for some time. The configuration was as follows;


    I used 6 north pole magnets facing out towards the coil core, with one transistor and the standard SSG circuit that includes one 23/26awg master trigger/power coil, around the 6 magnet rotor. Then I Wound 5 coils or nodes with 18awg wire at 50' one strand per coil. 50' pretty much filled 1 spool on the 3 pole kit.

    I then tuned the machine and started to add each one of the nodes (coils) in series, one at a time. Each of the 5 nodes was interacting with it's own north pole magnet on the rotor and as each node was added the machine would increased in rpm, reduced the primary current draw and charging went up. Higher rpm and torque was also further increased by removing the 23/26awg master coil from the solid mount and moving this master coil either to the right or left depending upon initial rotation, to gain some speed/ torque control or enhancement. Once the machine was tuned to the top of the bell curve you could even pull the 23/26 power coil off so that it was not interacting with the north pole magnets on the rotor and the machine would still trigger and run in this condition maintaining it's speed.

    I tested the output by putting a small dc motor on the output shaft and using it to generate current while powering a small light bulb, and measuring the voltage drop across the bulb while running. This allowed me to test the machine before and after adding the nodes and really showed the smallest increase or decrease in performance, as I experimented.

    I also found that you could install a south pole right in between the norths and further enhance your output torque, and rpm, but cannot remember what this did to my charging. Also with this I had to change out the small rotor for a larger one of 6-7" and I simply flipped the coils to gain the proper mounting clearance. I wanted a strong south pole attraction when the primary was powering the coils and also wanted the coils to be completely discharged upon leaving the zero point of the south magnet, hence the larger rotor helped me accomplish this. One more thing I did not want the machine to trigger off the newly added south pole magnets on the rotor so I moved the master 23/26 trigger- power coil to the small rotor on the outside of the 3 pole machine and triggered it with 6 all norths out, so that no triggering would take place on the souths only on the norths.

    I just though I would share some things I have worked on in the past... To the best of my memory the things listed above are accurate. Hope this helps.

    Dave Wing

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