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Thread: Making the bifilar coil with thinner guage wire.

  1. #1

    Smile Making the bifilar coil with thinner guage wire.

    Dear ALL,

    I have been seeing that everyone seems to be using thicker guages of magnetic wire for the bifilar coils. I would like to know if it would be ok to use say 30 & 34 SWG, which are quite thin. Wouldn't the higher impedance make a difference on the overall performance of the unit?

    Thanks,

    Tony.

  2. #2
    I have a small unit and I made my coil small with thin wire. It does work, but I was expecting to draw a lot less amp draw than with a normal coil.

    with a normal coil (1 ohm resistance) you would draw 120ma.

    And with my small and thin wire coil (12 ohms resistance) I draw about the same. 100-120 ma.

    Again, I thought that my small coil would draw less (because of the higher resistance) but it does not seems to make a diffecence (don't know why)

    best,

    Alvaro

  3. #3
    Dear Alvaro,

    Thanks for the reply.
    When you refer to 'drawing' 100-120 ma., I understand it is the current being taken by the machine from the RUN battery or is it something else. The reason why I thought about using thinner wire is because I'm given to understand that it is voltage that is more important than current, at the charge side. Also, thinner wire is easier to twist together.

    If the collapsing magnetic field energy is being stored in a capacitor and being dumped at a particular voltage level, the current required would build up at this point onwards. I remember reading somewhere, that the dump voltage spikes could be double the terminal voltage of the battery being charged & in some cases even higher.

    It would be great if Dr. Lindemann or John Bedini could comment on this too.

    Thanks,

    Tony.


    Quote Originally Posted by AlvaroHN View Post
    I have a small unit and I made my coil small with thin wire. It does work, but I was expecting to draw a lot less amp draw than with a normal coil.

    with a normal coil (1 ohm resistance) you would draw 120ma.

    And with my small and thin wire coil (12 ohms resistance) I draw about the same. 100-120 ma.

    Again, I thought that my small coil would draw less (because of the higher resistance) but it does not seems to make a diffecence (don't know why)

    best,

    Alvaro

  4. #4
    Yes I meant amp draw .

    These are my thoughts about this:

    John Bedini uses multiple strands of 18 wire or something like that. Why don't he uses just 1 wire much thicker?, maybe is because the Gabriel Kron’s thing about multiple paths???, if that is so, why don't he uses a lot of thin wires twisted together like you say?
    John Bedini has always said "is all about impedance matching", so like John Korn told us years ago in the yahoo groups; match the power coils to the primary batteries, put the primary in series to make the impedance a little higher (of the batteries), and put lot of power windings in parallel to lower the impedance (of the wires).

    Anyway, the impedance matching issue does not answer the question: what is best? 1 big wire or 10 medium wires in parallel or 100 thin wires in parallel all 3 options with the same impedance.

    best,

    Alvaro

  5. #5
    Senior Member Tom C's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlvaroHN View Post
    Yes I meant amp draw .

    These are my thoughts about this:

    John Bedini uses multiple strands of 18 wire or something like that. Why don't he uses just 1 wire much thicker?, maybe is because the Gabriel Kronís thing about multiple paths???, if that is so, why don't he uses a lot of thin wires twisted together like you say?
    John Bedini has always said "is all about impedance matching", so like John Korn told us years ago in the yahoo groups; match the power coils to the primary batteries, put the primary in series to make the impedance a little higher (of the batteries), and put lot of power windings in parallel to lower the impedance (of the wires).

    Anyway, the impedance matching issue does not answer the question: what is best? 1 big wire or 10 medium wires in parallel or 100 thin wires in parallel all 3 options with the same impedance.

    best,

    Alvaro

    look at the circuit a single circuit, what is the resistance of 130 FT of 20 AWG its around 1.3 ohms (1000 FT awg 20 is 10.15 ohms) for awg 18 it is less. there is also the matter of the number of electrons that have to be moved the "mass" in the copper. a really huge wire will not give you the potential you want as it absorbs all the pressure. imagine hooking up a 9 volt battery to a pair of 000 gauge wires and try to run a light bulb especially if its 100 feet long... not enough potential in the battery to move ANYTHING. the current would be dissipated IN the wire... the longer and smaller the wire the more resistance, the bigger the wire the less resistance but the problem with having enough current to move down the wire comes up - impedance problems in the wire.

    think of electricity like water, a small pipe short distance a small pump can push water up hill... big pipe, small pump, the pump will stall before the water can get uphill, the pump has too much mass to move.

    keep the single circuit resistance at or around 1 ohm. 10 medium wires in parallel act like 1 big thick stranded wire if they are not isolated from each other. even though 1 end of the coil is common + to the primary battery positive, because the other end is isolated at the transistor, the primary battery sees it as a parallel resistance. and because they all switch at the same time, they are isolated by the diode from each other until they sum after the diode.

    we look at the parallel base resistors the same way.

    Tom C


    experimental Kits, chargers and solar trackers

  6. #6
    I made one that worked. It's fun. It's like electrostatics but better. Turns everything into a conductor or inductor. Don't use a digital voltmeter or use it near any electronic devices unless you want to fry it.

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