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Thread: SynLube...

  1. #1

    SynLube, High Mileage Low Maint. Lube...

    Hi All,

    I was searching the net the other day for low friction oils for mileage gains, in an internal combustion engine. I found this link: http://books.google.ca/books?id=rwAA...0gains&f=false

    That link led me to search... Arcographite and eventually to SynLube found here: http://www.synlube.com/index.html

    I have not yet exhaustively researched this company or product yet, but I am in the process of doing such as we speak and before I buy it to use in my vehicle.

    Anyone tried this product in their vehicle and want to post about it? My opinion so far is that it seems like a very good product to use.

    -Dave Wing
    Last edited by Dave Wing; 10-12-2014 at 04:51 AM.

  2. #2
    Networking Architect Aaron Murakami's Avatar
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    Not very familiar with that but I can vouch for AMSOil. Promoted by statewide farm bureaus - many who have Caterpillar equipment swear by it. It's the only thing I have used for the last 15 years or so.

    I also use a vacclaisocryptene oil additive - the only undersurface lubricant known to science. In Canada, you can find it under the name Champion QX - they have all kinds of applications and you can find one to add to any oil you choose to use.

    In transverse cylinder wear tests, some have shown ZERO detectible wear on Caterpillar engines over x hours of running time. So AMSOil with Champion QX, I don't think there is a combo that can beat it for low friction.
    Aaron Murakami





    You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.” ― Richard Buckminster Fuller

  3. #3
    Here is another link on synthetics found in Popular Science, April 1976. http://books.google.ca/books?id=FAEA...epage&q&f=true

    The article starts on page 90 and stops on page 99. A few points from the article I summed up here are as follows...
    The synthetic oil change interval of Mobile 1, back then when R&D was done, was as high as 100,000 miles with no appreciable wear. The article even states the makers of Mobile 1 are indeed quite friendly with the known automotive manufacturers in Detroit and would not go so far as to recommend a increased oil change interval with this synthetic Mobil 1 product. So is this a classic example of suppression once again in the oil industry recommending lesser oil change intervals to sell more oil? Or perhaps the Mobile 1 synthetic that we see in today's market place is not of the same quality or composition as the initial product in these tests in the magazine article, hence the lower change interval. Either way we are taken to the cleaners again... What a joke!

    It does appear, even now more than ever, that SynLube may be what I am looking for. Here is what syn lube is made of...

    "SynLube™ Lube−4−Life® is a synergetic mixture of five liquid and three solid, synthetic, man made, chemically inert non-petroleum lubricants that are thermally stable at temperatures from -65°F (-54°C) to over 500°F (260°C). Sub-micronic* solid particles of Graphite, Moly (MoS2) and PTFE (Teflon® ) are colloidally suspended in a solution of liquid multi-viscosity lubricants.
    Note: * 25,400 microns or micro-meters is equal to one inch, the solid particles used in SynLube™ Lube−4−Life® range in size from 0.1 micron to no more than 1.5 micron (see SEM image below)." Taken from SynLube website FAQ's http://www.synlube.com/faq1.html

    SynLube may be the best option available today for internal engine component lubrication and or protection, increased milage gains and extended drain intervals, currently nothing is even close, at least that is what I have found in research.

    With periodic air/oil filter changes and top ups being the only thing to do for 50,000 -100,000+ miles, that sounds very intriguing to me. Personally I think also one should use magnets on the oil filter to trap any small particles of metal that may make it into the oil to help reduce engine wear along with regular oil analysis to monitor and or ensure the claims set forth by SynLube are valid.


    -Dave Wing
    Last edited by Dave Wing; 10-12-2014 at 03:50 PM.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Murakami View Post
    Not very familiar with that but I can vouch for AMSOil. Promoted by statewide farm bureaus - many who have Caterpillar equipment swear by it. It's the only thing I have used for the last 15 years or so.

    I also use a vacclaisocryptene oil additive - the only undersurface lubricant known to science. In Canada, you can find it under the name Champion QX - they have all kinds of applications and you can find one to add to any oil you choose to use.

    In transverse cylinder wear tests, some have shown ZERO detectible wear on Caterpillar engines over x hours of running time. So AMSOil with Champion QX, I don't think there is a combo that can beat it for low friction.
    SynLube also has Moly in its formula, plus graphite and Teflon colloids.

    -Dave Wing

  5. #5
    I also use a vacclaisocryptene oil additive - the only undersurface lubricant known to science. In Canada, you can find it under the name Champion QX - they have all kinds of applications and you can find one to add to any oil you choose to use.
    Aaron,

    I have spent quite a bit of time looking into vacclaisocryptene - QX, apparently it is made from 7 different chemicals, Champion QX has these 7 chemicals and MoS2 added. But there is not much info posted on the net about this product. After reading what I could find... It does appear to be very beneficial. Perhaps it could be added to SynLube.

    So I would like to ask you a few questions. What is your oil change interval on your car with POA full synthetic Amsoil and Champion QX? I also would like to know if you have seen any breakdown in the chemical composition (discoloration or change in oil color) of your oil if you do in fact use extended drain intervals, that are perhaps above and beyond those recommended or suggested by Amsoil?

    Thanks,

    -Dave Wing
    Last edited by Dave Wing; 10-13-2014 at 11:08 PM.

  6. #6
    Networking Architect Aaron Murakami's Avatar
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    Looks like a lot of shady stuff with a lot of synthetic oil companies and amsoil is no exception - maybe even more so than others.

    It works great and beats Mobile1 in some tests and Mobile1 beats amsoil in others. But looks like Redline may be all of them.

    Check this out: http://www.msttn.com/dyna/OilReport.pdf a wealth of info in that document.

    It is hard to find data on Synlube because the name of their product is a term that is used for all synthetic lubrication.

    I change my oil about ever 10,000-15,000 miles. At about 10k miles, I just change the filter and keep topping it off for the next 5k miles - then I drain the whole thing.

    You can get pretty serious bypass filter systems that are good up to 60k miles or more.

    I haven't look at this kind of oil info in about 15 years as far as engine oil.

    The Synlube site attacks Amsoil and Mobile1. On the Amsoil page, they seem to selectively leave out facts that are pertinent to what they're bringing up. Amsoil was originally Amzoil - Pennzoil sued them and won and that is why there is a name change but out of all the research Synlube seems to be doing, they leave it out and make it look like it is something ominous - I can't believe they didn't come across that because they seem too detail oriented in slamming the competition. Their page looks like it is put together by a 5th grader - not that it speaks to the product, but they need to update their whole presentation.

    It looks like good oil, but "the only oil you never have to change" - well, not sure. Where are their wear tests in comparison to the other oils.

    It should work pretty good through - let us know if you do find some real engine wear tests comparing Synlube, Redline, Amsoil and Mobile1.

    From the tests I can see - it looks like Redline is actually the best and it beats Amsoil in some wear tests. Not sure how it compares to Synlube - can't find any real tests to compare them.

    Next time I change my oil, I'm getting this: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...SIN=B004BONVB6 plus another 1-2 quarts to keep on hand. Not sure what filter I want to use - might get one of those "permanent" ones.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    This is my old site http://vacclaisocryptene.com - has a few tests quoted.

    Even if Synlube has moly, it won't do the same as Champion QX.

    The vacclaisocryptene penetrates the metal and has bazillions of little microscopic beads like small ball bearings. When there is heat or pressure on the metal, it sweats this stuff out so there is virtually no metal to metal contact - like rolling on a film of countless microscopic ball bearings. Story goes it was developed by the Germans for use in oil refineries to greatly extend the time between maintenance intervals on large equipment. Was discovered and actually classified by the US Govt who got their hands on it and was using it too - supposedly that is why so much of our WWII trucks, planes, etc... ran just fine on a lot less oil, which was in short supply, than they were supposed to.

    I discovered it through a company that was selling a fuel additive and some other products. They were a bunch of crooks but their products were top notch. Finally found out that Champion QX was the same stuff. Before the US company went out of business, I managed to order a gallon of it for a few hundred dollars. Not letting that stuff out of my site! lol

    They do have automatic transmission additives too - I personally know a few people that needed to have their transmissions rebuilt - put this additive in and all problems went away, literally.

    NASA used grease impregnated with the vacclaisocryptene and that is what is on the Lunar Rover.

    I think this is the main homepage: http://www.championqxecanada.com/en/index.php

    This stuff will outright double the service life of virtually any engine.

    It takes 1.66 ounces per 4-5 quarts - just add to the oil and that is about it.

    I see they have additives for differentials too...haven't seen that before.
    Aaron Murakami





    You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.” ― Richard Buckminster Fuller

  7. #7
    Another thing to look into is diamond lube. One application is required

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wing View Post

    Personally I think also one should use magnets on the oil filter to trap any small particles of metal that may make it into the oil to help reduce engine wear along with regular oil analysis to monitor and or ensure the claims set forth by SynLube are valid.


    -Dave Wing
    I have heard about magnets on the fuel line. With hydrocarbons not being polar molecules don't know how magnetic field would have an effect, though mpg improvement is attested to be credible people. Even read something on the internet of someone presenting the findings to a major car company and the response was all future cars of theirs had rubber fuel lines which were hard to get at, no idea whether it is true. So that said, anyone ever just try magnets on the gas tank? If there is some structural arrangment change of hydrocarbon clusters, again have no theory for that, but the tank would be metal, distance from magnet would be much greater than fuel line but fuel would be exposed 24/7. Just thought I'd throw it out there to see if others have already tried it.

  9. #9
    I always put a strong neo magnet on the oil filter to help trap small metal particles. Check into Torco oil and their magnetic Oil treatment. I put their torco diesel regular oil in somebodies car along with the magnetic oil treatment and the mileage when way up.

  10. #10
    Networking Architect Aaron Murakami's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZPDM View Post
    I have heard about magnets on the fuel line. With hydrocarbons not being polar molecules don't know how magnetic field would have an effect, though mpg improvement is attested to be credible people. Even read something on the internet of someone presenting the findings to a major car company and the response was all future cars of theirs had rubber fuel lines which were hard to get at, no idea whether it is true. So that said, anyone ever just try magnets on the gas tank? If there is some structural arrangment change of hydrocarbon clusters, again have no theory for that, but the tank would be metal, distance from magnet would be much greater than fuel line but fuel would be exposed 24/7. Just thought I'd throw it out there to see if others have already tried it.
    There have been countless studies showing permanent and pulsed electromagnetics have effects on hydrocarbons.

    Here is one rooted in some studies from Temple University: http://www.rigzone.com/news/oil_gas/...or_Heavy_Crude
    I have all the original papers. Reducing the viscosity of oil.

    The magnets we deal with at http://magnetizerproducts.com were tested on gas lines for a boiler and I don't recall the device, but was something like a Honeywell purple peeper or purple peep meter (really) that lets you see the color change immediately after putting on the magnets showing more btu's coming out of the same amount of gas.

    We have a testimonial on that same page, written by Siemens engineers that saved something like 17% on fuel on 3 big boilers at a big site over in Turkey. You can see the other testimonials by governments, etc... around the world.
    Aaron Murakami





    You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.” ― Richard Buckminster Fuller

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