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Thread: Patent #US7990110 FIG.1 - Replication

  1. #21
    James,
    The MC gives all kinds of control over the circuit that cannot be achieved with fixed parts which is one reason I favor it. What I mean by that is I have created programs that will jump from one freq to another to another and another in a loop. It would be the equivalent of turning the pot to different positions but hundreds of times a second and not hitting the spaces in between, not only targeted frequencies but multiples and other times octave climbing. Sweeps, steps, rests, all precisely controlled by a quarts crystal.

    I have not shown everything I have tried but the board allows me to save it as a program and I can load it back up whenever I want without ever breaking out the soldering iron. For experimenting it is really a wonderful solution, you should try one sometime and I think you will see what I mean.

  2. #22
    Hi Bob

    I like that idea...I have never worked with an MC, but have considered learning how to program a PIC...what do you think about PIC MCs? Have you ever used them?

    The reason I am asking, is that I already have the programs for doing the coding and interfacing with a PIC on my OS, and all I need is the interface programmer hardware and MC...
    Last edited by James_Somewhere_In_Idaho; 01-03-2016 at 11:49 AM.
    Best Regards ~ James, Somewhere In Idaho

  3. #23
    I like the Arduino's better, and the Arduino Micro has been a good one so far, and the Spark Fun Arduino PRO Micro with the Spark fun 5A Hall current sensor has been good, a bit trickie to get to not have noise on it in the mA ranges, but has worked for over 1A very well

    https://www.sparkfun.com/products/12640

    https://www.sparkfun.com/products/8883

  4. #24
    I only work with the Arduino so I couldn't say about the others, not in a snobbish way it's just that I picked my first ard up at radio shack on a whim and just found it easy to work with so I stuck with it.

    There are plenty of tutorials out there to show how to build custom boards that can be made smaller or use only chips and power required for your final project. The Arduino UNO is what I use and it has a lot of stuff that I do not use on it but that doesn't bother me.

    Here is a look at how you can make custom boards for specifec applications. I personally never bothered because the uno is acceptable size and power for my needs.

    Link:
    http://playground.arduino.cc/Learning/AtmegaStandalone

    I have been eyeballing this little gem for future projects, small and ready to go.
    https://www.adafruit.com/products/1501


    As you have seen on the machine featured in this thread pair an aurduio with a solid state relay and you have a fantastic switching platform to play with. Pay close attention to the relays input requirement and you can run it directly from the MC. 2nd generation uses 1.5ma and 3rd gen generally 10-15ma.

    I use crydom SSR's which come in 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 100 A load handling configurations. You saw in the other thread for my new wheel where I was using the crystal cells to power a relay, that was the 5A load model, if a crystal cell can do it you know the aurduino can too right ;-) The first version of this device used a FET instead of the SSR and Aurduino powered it on it's own too.
    Last edited by BobZilla; 01-03-2016 at 02:47 PM.

  5. #25
    Hi Bob

    Ya, I salvaged a boatload of Crydom D1D40 SSRs of which I am using two in my current build...Removed trivial stuff...This is a good topic...Thanks Bob...
    Last edited by James_Somewhere_In_Idaho; 01-04-2016 at 10:52 PM.
    Best Regards ~ James, Somewhere In Idaho

  6. #26
    Senior Member John_Koorn's Avatar
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    Hi guys, my 2 cents worth...

    I've used different models of PIC a lot and find them very easy to work with. Programming in BASIC is pretty easy and there's a lot of documentation and support forums on the internet. Like Bob said, a MC is a very handy tool for experimenting. I've mostly used mine to drive optocouplers as well as using the ADC inputs to sense cap or battery voltages. I also used one for a battery rejuvenator, whereas the PIC would allow the user to select the charge and load level and then control the charging circuitry, sense the battery voltage, control variable loads and display the status and battery voltage on an LCD.

    Most recently I used mine as a push-pull circuit controller by using the advanced PWM module. This allowed me to clock the CPU at 40Mhz and achieve PWM frequencies of up to 1Mhz with programmable duty cycle and dead time control.

    John K.

  7. #27
    I might have to try PIC sometime, thanks for sharing the info John.

    James, a comment on one thing you said..

    I hope to design a shut down circuit that uses that senses 15.3-15.3 volts and shuts down the charging for a period of time, to let the battery settle, then turns it back on--doing that until I show up to turn the system off
    I tell you what.... once you get the logic in place for that their is a similar thing you can do to really improve your cop. I have done a similar thing but not using any voltage sensing. If you run a solid state at a fairly high frequency, at least a 100HZ or better and program an intentional rest in the freaking battery will increase it's charge rate and voltage when it starts back up.

    I'm not sure if I am explaining this in an understandable way but what I mean is charge for say 5 min, then stop for a min, then back on again for 5 , then back off again,, What happens is the charge keeps going even when off, and the primary recovers a bit when off, so when it kicks back on you will see it return and climb the same as if you never put the break in. Now I do not mean like if your at 14+ volts and you cut off it will magically stay up there, no it wont but when it kicks back on you will notice that the curve proceeds as if it had been running the whole time. I have heard some of the long timers say things like "it keeps charging after shut off" but I didn't really understand, I was looking for the meter to stay where it was. That's not how it works but those ion's are still moving and it is like charging for free. The periods need to be worked out for the machine in use and the charge target but it does work, I just threw the 5 min and 1 min in as an example in the real world you have to find the right run/pause ratio. I have seen the best results using this method from mode one, not cap dumping. Maybe I will shoot a little vid of it.

  8. #28
    Hi John K and Bob

    John, my research, much like you say, indicates that the PIC is more versatile, especially for open source projects. Thank you for your input.

    Bob, Hmmm...I had not thought of that. Thank you. I will probably get her running...Removed trivial stuff... and play with the charger in different configurations with the set I intend to keep...maybe try your idea then. Sounds intriguing.

    ...Removed some trivial stuff...
    Last edited by James_Somewhere_In_Idaho; 01-04-2016 at 10:54 PM.
    Best Regards ~ James, Somewhere In Idaho

  9. #29
    Senior Member Faraday88's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by James_Somewhere_In_Idaho View Post
    Hi John K and Bob

    John, my research, much like you say, indicates that the PIC is more versatile, especially for open source projects. Thank you for your input.

    Bob, Hmmm...I had not thought of that. Thank you. I will probably get her running, and finish restoring all three sets of my big batteries, then sell two sets for seed money, and play with the charger in different configurations with the set I intend to keep...maybe try your idea then. Sounds intriguing.

    I sat down and pre-soldered all the hard circuits to the transistors (16 matched sets) this evening. Hopefully, I will be mounting them tomorrow, then on to cutting out component holes on the front panel. Maybe I'll upload a couple pics (temporarily) when it's up-n-going, if you all are interested in seeing it...
    Hi James,
    I liked your signature phrase below.... i remember reading it from JB site in the early 2000's...
    Rgds,
    Faraday88.
    'Wisdom comes from living out of the knowledge.'

  10. #30
    Senior Member John_Koorn's Avatar
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    Hey guys, just to add, if you just want to use a MC as a timing device there are other options available. Here's some you may want to think about...

    The good old 555 timer is an easy chip to play with. Very cheap, but you can do a fair bit with it. There are plenty of timing calculators online you can use to compute the Rt and Ct values to get your frequency and duty cycle. I guess the down side is you are limited to >51% duty cycle out of the box, but there's a couple of circuits around that can get around that. It's also difficult to maintain the duty cycle if you're adjusting the Rt on the fly.

    Next on the list is the tried and trusted SG3525A. Mostly used for its PWM dual channel complimentary outputs in push-pull circuits such as power supplies, inverters and DC-DC converters, it's easy to setup and very robust. It's limited to 100Hz-400kHz but that's a pretty decent range for a cheap chip. (Bob, it would run your 528Hz SS SG and cap dumper no problem ). It also has capability for dead time adjustment and will also sink/source 200mA at a Vcc between 8v-40v. Also has onboard error amplifier, although I haven't played with that part of it.

    However, if you're thinking of playing with a PIC (or other type of MC) I would suggest getting a prototyping kit that supports a high-end chip that has all of the capabilities. This will allow you to experiment a lot further and do a lot more.
    I use a PICAXE 40X2 (PIC 18F4520) mounted on an AXE022 prototyping kit which has USB connection to my PC. The software is free and as I said, very easy to learn. Once you get savvy with the software you can also use the built in simulator and debug features.
    The good thing I found was that I can use the prototyping kit to develop the circuit I'm building and then when I'm ready to do a proper build I can buy a lower end PIC that just does what I need it to do.

    Anyway, food for thought.

    John K.

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