Bedini RPX Sideband Generator

* NEW * BEDINI RPX BOOK & DVD SET: BEDINI RPX


2019 ESTC ALL SEATS SOLD OUT!
PRE-REGISTER FOR THE
2020 ENERGY CONFERENCE

Monero XMR

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 41 to 46 of 46

Thread: Bedini - Forced Charge - Mode #2 <<< OVERUNITY>>>

  1. #41
    Dave,
    that's fantastic! I've seen many people split the positive in all kinds of ways, I never saw anyone do it quite the way you are in the vid. Maybe others have and will chime in... You have all kinds of good mojo going for you right now.
    Thanks!
    Sincerely,
    Patrick

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wing View Post
    Hi all,

    I think I replicated the splitting the positive, John Bedini has talked about. Watch the video and let me know what you all think.






    I see the video is 90 degrees out, I will remake the video properly.

    Dave Wing

  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wing View Post
    Hi all,

    I think I replicated the splitting the positive, John Bedini has talked about. Watch the video and let me know what you all think.




    I see the video is 90 degrees out, I will remake the video properly.

    Dave Wing
    Video remake...



    Dave Wing

  3. #43
    Senior Member John_Koorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    1,077
    Hey Dave, thanks for sharing all of your work.

    I wanted to share what I am experimenting with, which is similar to what you are doing. I'll try to explain, but will also do a video when I get a chance.

    I'm using the 3 battery switch as per the picture of John's you posted:

    BTW, one small correction. JB said if you can't understand this you won't be able to successfully build a Tesla Switch.

    What I am doing is putting an SG (in gen mode) where the load is on the above picture. What this does is pulse charges the 3rd battery with the difference of potential between the 2 series batteries and the single 3rd battery.
    The output of the SG is then connected to a 4th battery and obviously also charges as we would expect. The 2 series batteries do discharge, but at a slower rate than you would expect.
    Once the 3rd and 4th batteries are charged to ~15v (one will charge at a different rate to the other) I then switch the batteries around - the two charged batteries are placed in series, the lowest of the other batteries is connected as the 3rd battery, the SG placed as the load and the 4th battery is connected as the output of the SG.

    I have been recording the voltages of all 4 batteries over many repetitive cycles and have noticed that I am seeing overall gains in the sum of all the battery voltages. I have also done the same experiment with different sized and different types of batteries and every time I am seeing overall gains. This setup is like a self-running battery charging system.

    A couple of notes if you want to try this:
    1. Try and use 4 batteries that are the same
    2. Start off with small batteries until you can see what is going on and understand what is happening (large batteries will just take longer)
    3. Use an SG that can charge the 4th battery to at least 15v
    4. I am using the diode on the SG negative output, you may wish to try it without the diode (as Dave and Patrick are doing)
    5. You may have to let the batteries rest before switching - if the SG input voltage is >1V above the 4th battery voltage it will not run
    6. You can use a solid state or rotored SG
    7. You can run the SG in conventional or gen mode
    8. I have not tried using a cap pulser on the output of the SG yet.

    I didn't want to hijack your thread Dave, so I've started another thread for this as well - just wanted to post this here as it is similar to what you are doing.

    John K.
    Last edited by John_Koorn; 01-26-2014 at 11:02 PM. Reason: Added link to other thread

  4. #44
    I'm absolutely smitten w/ this concept since you first started to work w/ it on the old yahoo forum. It was your experiments of JB's work at the time of the tesla switch that got me into it.

    I did a ton of experiments much like what you are doing w/ the ssg as the load. I used 9 different types of brush type motors, 6 different configurations of the SSG/joule thief/joule ringer/SS SSG... as a load as well as resistive loads and a few off the wall loads I won't mention.

    Dave Bowling (Turion on the energetic forum) has a thread titled 3BGS that is using this "splitting the positive" type technique, very interesting... but I truly like the simplicity of what Dave (here) has done. run the neg neg mod 12 volts charging 24 then once in a while run a "split Pos mode" to charge back the primary.

    been playing around with this today coming up w/ methods to automate the "split pos" part. there are loads that work better than others to charge the "third/primary battery". best loads I found were the efficient brush type motors that have NO caps or silicon to squelch the spikes. Kind of like what Dave is already using.

    anyway lot's of fun - thanks,
    Patrick



    Quote Originally Posted by John_Koorn View Post
    Hey Dave, thanks for sharing all of your work.

    I wanted to share what I am experimenting with, which is similar to what you are doing. I'll try to explain, but will also do a video when I get a chance.

    I'm using the 3 battery switch as per the picture of John's you posted:

    BTW, one small correction. JB said if you can't understand this you won't be able to successfully build a Tesla Switch.

    What I am doing is putting an SG (in gen mode) where the load is on the above picture. What this does is pulse charges the 3rd battery with the difference of potential between the 2 series batteries and the single 3rd battery.
    The output of the SG is then connected to a 4th battery and obviously also charges as we would expect. The 2 series batteries do discharge, but at a slower rate than you would expect.
    Once the 3rd and 4th batteries are charged to ~15v (one will charge at a different rate to the other) I then switch the batteries around - the two charged batteries are placed in series, the lowest of the other batteries is connected as the 3rd battery, the SG placed as the load and the 4th battery is connected as the output of the SG.

    I have been recording the voltages of all 4 batteries over many repetitive cycles and have noticed that I am seeing overall gains in the sum of all the battery voltages. I have also done the same experiment with different sized and different types of batteries and every time I am seeing overall gains. This setup is like a self-running battery charging system.

    A couple of notes if you want to try this:
    1. Try and use 4 batteries that are the same
    2. Start off with small batteries until you can see what is going on and understand what is happening (large batteries will just take longer)
    3. Use an SG that can charge the 4th battery to at least 15v
    4. I am using the diode on the SG negative output, you may wish to try it without the diode (as Dave and Patrick are doing)
    5. You may have to let the batteries rest before switching - if the SG input voltage is >1V above the 4th battery voltage it will not run
    6. You can use a solid state or rotored SG
    7. You can run the SG in conventional or gen mode
    8. I have not tried using a cap pulser on the output of the SG yet.

    I didn't want to hijack your thread Dave, so I've started another thread for this as well - just wanted to post this here as it is similar to what you are doing.

    John K.

  5. #45
    Senior Member John_Koorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    1,077
    Thanks Patrick,

    I'm intending to try out what Dave is doing and see what the difference is. I haven't been keeping up with Turion's thread, but I do know of at least one person that had good success with it.

    Just to note, I'm actually "splitting the negative" with my setup, instead of the positive - but not sure it makes any difference or not.

    John K.

  6. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by John_Koorn View Post
    Hey Dave, thanks for sharing all of your work.

    I wanted to share what I am experimenting with, which is similar to what you are doing. I'll try to explain, but will also do a video when I get a chance.

    I'm using the 3 battery switch as per the picture of John's you posted:

    BTW, one small correction. JB said if you can't understand this you won't be able to successfully build a Tesla Switch.

    What I am doing is putting an SG (in gen mode) where the load is on the above picture. What this does is pulse charges the 3rd battery with the difference of potential between the 2 series batteries and the single 3rd battery.
    The output of the SG is then connected to a 4th battery and obviously also charges as we would expect. The 2 series batteries do discharge, but at a slower rate than you would expect.
    Once the 3rd and 4th batteries are charged to ~15v (one will charge at a different rate to the other) I then switch the batteries around - the two charged batteries are placed in series, the lowest of the other batteries is connected as the 3rd battery, the SG placed as the load and the 4th battery is connected as the output of the SG.

    I have been recording the voltages of all 4 batteries over many repetitive cycles and have noticed that I am seeing overall gains in the sum of all the battery voltages. I have also done the same experiment with different sized and different types of batteries and every time I am seeing overall gains. This setup is like a self-running battery charging system.

    A couple of notes if you want to try this:
    1. Try and use 4 batteries that are the same
    2. Start off with small batteries until you can see what is going on and understand what is happening (large batteries will just take longer)
    3. Use an SG that can charge the 4th battery to at least 15v
    4. I am using the diode on the SG negative output, you may wish to try it without the diode (as Dave and Patrick are doing)
    5. You may have to let the batteries rest before switching - if the SG input voltage is >1V above the 4th battery voltage it will not run
    6. You can use a solid state or rotored SG
    7. You can run the SG in conventional or gen mode
    8. I have not tried using a cap pulser on the output of the SG yet.

    I didn't want to hijack your thread Dave, so I've started another thread for this as well - just wanted to post this here as it is similar to what you are doing.

    John K.

    Hi John K.

    Thanks for the correction about the quote for the Telsa switch and your input. Are you running the SG in Gen mode in position 1 of the diagram, but between the two negatives? Have you tried reversing the SG leads and if so what did you find?

    The way I have the small brushless motor set up will be changed to the way you are running your machine, between the two positives or the two negatives while a second SG is connected across the two charging a 4th battery. This way seems like it could be a good way of doing things and I will compare.

    My early results... I have found that my Conventional DC motor system configuration, which is between the two positives according to position 1 and was used periodically to recharge the primary battery, never drained the overall system when run. Voltages between the primary and secondary always seemed to end up at the near same place or even a little higher after a primary recharge with the DC motor. After a six hour rest the system seemed to have lost some voltage, the loss was very small indeed like perhaps .04 of a volt over the course of a 12 hour period but it could be attributed to overcharging the primary and wasting current this way. I need to do some controlled experiments to find out for sure.

    With all that said there has to be an optimum configuration for the best results and that will take some time to find out what that will be.

    Dave Wing
    Last edited by Dave Wing; 01-27-2014 at 06:09 PM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •