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Thread: Snowman 8 Transistor SSG Build - Trigger Problems?

  1. #11
    Are you crimping your coil wire connectors on? If so than I would highly recommend you solder them, don't use crimping on any of it.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Yaro1776's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobZilla View Post
    Are you crimping your coil wire connectors on? If so than I would highly recommend you solder them, don't use crimping on any of it.
    Hey BobZilla

    Yes, I have been crimping the coil wires to the terminals and then attaching to the board. At the time it seemed the simplest solution for start up purposes, however experience has shown that this is not necessarily the best method. Thank you for reinforcing the point.

    Happy Holidays,
    Yaro

  3. #13
    crimp and solder.. do it so.. better than tight

  4. #14
    Senior Member John_Koorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrRonsen View Post
    crimp and solder.. do it so.. better than tight
    Yes, crimp and solder. JB stressed this when we were working on the bike wheel kit in his shop. There's a video of it somewhere.

    To do it properly, crimp the coil wire to the eye connector making sure ALL of the enamel is scraped off the wire. Then use a 3rd hand to hold the connector. Heat up the connector with the soldering iron and then feed the solder into it - about 1/2" of solder should do it.

    For the other end of the coil wires, which are all joined together and go to primary positive, JB used a solder pot and dipped about 1" of wire into it. If you don't have a solder pot get like a 100W soldering iron, make sure the ends of the wires a really hot and then feed a couple of inches of solder in there - make sure ALL of the wires are well soldered together. If you don't have a 100W soldering iron, next best thing is to crimp and solder individual eye connectors to each wire and screw them all together, preferably with star washers in between all the separate connectors.

    John K.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Yaro1776's Avatar
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    Cool Snowman SSG 8 Transistor Build Salient Points

    Post Mortem for the beginner:

    Well, we have overcome the initial hurdles for the beginning SSG researcher and outlined below are the perceived major points to a successful start up build:

    1) For the 8 transistor SSG board follow the instructions, some assembly required here. Read instructions at least three times to decipher the mysteries. Have a copy of the Beginners book and, most importantly a knowledgeable friend - the forum is gooood for this!

    2) Refine your soldering skills as the board progresses - Jim McD noted a number of cold solder joints on the Snowman's board, fortunately he pointed out this error in technique - Thanks James.

    3) Figuring out the magnet North/South situation, in combination with the coil polarity can be challenging for the first timer. If you buy the kit it becomes a relative no brainer, however it may burn a hole in the pocket. Well worth it!

    4) The battery, coil and trigger termination points were a significant puzzle for this first timer. Instruction set could be better to clarify termination positions with a picture or diagram. There is no mystery here! Tell me - which is the coil start and end...

    5) The wire terminations to the board posts were a minor/major issue to the Snowman. Highly recommended by the gurus to solder these points to eliminate any chance of a poor connection, double crimp and solder - the Snowman concurs with this advice; time consuming, yes, but worth the effort. Been there, done that.

    6) Label all the power and trigger connections - if you have a eidetic memory you are golden - unfortunately we do not have this blessing, we wound up using the labels which were very handy in moments of excitement.

    7) Pay attention to the coil gap dimension; use the recommended 1/8" as a starting point. Find a plastic ruler and measure bottom of magnet to top of coil holder/spool. The projecting welding rod ends within the coil should not be facing the magnets. Why? Check out the books.

    8) When you connect the first coil wires and power cables make sure that you give the bicycle wheel a PO'd pull/push to get that puppy spinning real fast - then remove (+) Positive charge battery wire to look at the neons - if they fire you are golden. You are almost there.

    9) Don't worry about the wheel bearings at this point - deal with this nuisance later. Connect the rest of the coil wires progressively and get the beast running first!

    10) Be objective and willing to admit your ignorance of all things Bedini...

    The above is truly no indication of the technical competence of this writer - take it with a grain of salt, since the Snowman is in the same sea of ignorance. Be humble and learn.

    Happy Holidays,
    Yaro

  6. #16
    Here is the video John mentioned. Towards the end is the soldering bit.


    Crimp if you want but if you know how to solder there ain't nothing ever going to come loose. Now if you do a piss poor job than yea it will, and crimping is just going to hold a loose connector on there.

    Note to anyone not familiar with soldering and using the video as a reference. Not all mag wire insulation will melt away as it does in that video. You are best off scraping it off to be sure.

  7. #17
    Senior Member John_Koorn's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting the video Bob. Good point, JB uses a special type of mag wire where the insulation can be melted off with a soldering iron.

    John K.

  8. #18
    You bet John..

    Guys I want to explain something about soldering for anyone who does not have much experience, you can take it or leave it.

    When you solder something you are not supposed to be heating the solder up and dripping it on. many beginners think of it like a glue or something and this is not the way. What you need to do is heat both components hot enough to melt the solder when you touch the solder too it. The iron is not for melting solder, it is for heating the wire and connector or wire to wire, whatever you are working on. When you are soldering on a circuit board you heat the component and then touch your solder to it and it will flow over, you do not want to get gobs of solder on your iron and try to drip it on. It is very important for the component to be soldered to be hot, if not the solder will not bond and you will have a bad connection. It may stick at first but will soon pop right off.

    Do not blow on the solder either, it needs to cool on it's own or you will crackle it. Not sure what I mean, get a scrap of wire and play around. See what happens if the wire is not hot, see what it looks like if you blow on it verses not blowing on it. If you look closely you will see a difference. If you are soldering something kind of big do not solder it and then poke the iron into it because one side is not bonded, picking and poking with the iron will only mess things up. If you need to fix a large joint let it cool pretty well first instead of poking around with the iron at it and then heat the whole thing evenly, otherwise you are going to over heat your component. If it is just wire than this is not as much of a concern but just remember to get the whole joint hot all around evenly. If you need to fix a joint make sure you heat all of the solder evenly so it all flows, you may even need to use some flux if oxidation has occurred on the joint.

    If you are soldering electronic components you should clip on an alligator clip to the other side of the lead if you can fit it in there temporarily. You want the clip to act as a heat sink to protect your component

    For new work however the main thing I am telling you is you are heating the components and flowing the solder onto them, not heating the solder and dripping it into them. To much of that and you will have burned up the flux that is in the solder and it will not bond to a cold component anyway, it will form around it but not with it.

    About the crimping, the reason I say not too is because crimping is a compression fitting which is designed for multi-strand wire termination. Mag wire is a solid core and when you squeeze the hell out of it you are just weakening and deforming the wire. With a muti-strand wire it compresses them all together to form almost like a solid core connector but that is because their is air and space between the strands which can compress.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Tom C's Avatar
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    Yaro,

    thanks for the input we will add to our documentation to make things a bit easier.... all new coils now being made have the word TOP on the "top" of the coil. we will add other changes to the instructions to help new builders.


    Tom C
    Last edited by Tom C; 12-19-2013 at 03:16 AM.


    experimental Kits, chargers and solar trackers

  10. #20
    Senior Member Yaro1776's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom C View Post
    Yaro,

    thanks for the input we will add to our documentation to make things a bit easier.... all now coils now being made have the word TOP on the top of the coil. we will add other changes to the instructions to help new builders.


    Tom C
    You are most welcome! All in all you have done a great job in putting this together for the rank amateur - the tweaks will only enhance the product and the mission.

    Happy Christmas!
    Yaro

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