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Thread: Argus 215 MP HELP

  1. #1

    Argus 215 MP HELP

    I am looking to wire an ac adapter to my Argus flash. The 2 AA battery terminals are both facing one direction. This makes me unsure of where to wire what. Pics are attached to help. Please assist. argus 1.jpgargus 2.jpg

  2. #2
    Hi Medusa,

    I attached your picture with couple questions - argus 1.jpg

  3. #3
    I soldered the green wire ( formerly thinner and black) and yes the two metal items are the battery terminals. I clipped them to make them more solder ready.




    Quote Originally Posted by blackchisel97 View Post
    Hi Medusa,

    I attached your picture with couple questions - argus 1.jpg

  4. #4
    Can you also tell if black wire coming from the capacitor connects on circuit board to the left battery terminal? I cannot see clearly on the pic.
    Capacitor wires are color coded; red is positive and black negative and it is possible that negative is common for the entire circuit so it will also indicate negative battery terminal (if it is connected to it).

  5. #5
    The two black wires that come from capacitor.....1 goes to bulb..the other feeds through the board and seems to be connected next to a resistor. argus3.jpg




    Quote Originally Posted by blackchisel97 View Post
    Can you also tell if black wire coming from the capacitor connects on circuit board to the left battery terminal? I cannot see clearly on the pic.
    Capacitor wires are color coded; red is positive and black negative and it is possible that negative is common for the entire circuit so it will also indicate negative battery terminal (if it is connected to it).

  6. #6
    It looks like the left terminal (when looking at your picture) should be the negative. You'll not damage anything by reversing battery polarity. It just won't work. Turn main switch on and connect either two AA's in series or your 3V adapter as I told you. You should hear raising high pitch sound meaning that the oscillator works and the capacitor is charging. Be careful around the capacitor terminals. You can temporarily short wires going out for your coil and press the discharge button, once orange light comes on. This way you'll discharge the capacitor and know for sure that everything works before putting back inside.

    Hope this helps
    V

  7. #7
    I tried it connecting both pos and neg from adapter to each of the terminals and no go. I switched them and still no go. I looked at the case again and it seems that both of the battery negatives were again the springs terminals not facing alternatively. I think this was batteries wired in parallel. If that is the case I'd have to connect the negative adapter wire to one of the terminals and solder a jumper wire to the other terminal...but then where would the positive wire from adapter go to?? Am I way off track with this train of thought?

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by medusa View Post
    I tried it connecting both pos and neg from adapter to each of the terminals and no go. I switched them and still no go. I looked at the case again and it seems that both of the battery negatives were again the springs terminals not facing alternatively. I think this was batteries wired in parallel. If that is the case I'd have to connect the negative adapter wire to one of the terminals and solder a jumper wire to the other terminal...but then where would the positive wire from adapter go to?? Am I way off track with this train of thought?
    Regardless how batteries were connected, there is no third terminal or wire which would provide another pole to the circuit. Following this, it seems that both trimmed terminals are for negative and positive coming from the battery compartment. I can't find any manual or picture showing open compartment. There had to be a common metal strip in the compartment before (opposing side of terminals) where serial connection between batteries was made.
    Let's go over again;
    Both, green and black wires were originally soldered to the same side of bulb. All you did was to replace the black with a thicker one and no other changes were done. It seems weird that two wires are going from the board to the bulb when could be connected on the board and only one wire used.
    You did unsolder the red wire from the bulb so it can be connected to the coil and other wire from coil will go back to the bulb. Nothing else has been changed.
    I just want to make sure you didn't change anything else and flash was working before.
    When you turn flash on and connect 3V to the terminals (both ways) nothing happens.
    Something is not connected here.
    I'll go over your pictures again after supper and try to draw the circuit in my head.

    Be back
    V

    Just one more question: How do you know that flash was working before?
    Last edited by blackchisel97; 08-26-2013 at 06:03 PM.

  9. #9
    I connected the red wire ( formerly black) as I assumed it came loose from the bulb connection. There seemed to be no other place it could have come loose from and each side of the bulb would have initially had two connections as witnessed through the original red wires. The flash was working years ago when I was treating myself but the unit got so hot it stopped working. I had assumed the capacitor burned out. I had not started my self education about electronics back then. As I look at the kit again this morning I still am of the opinion that the 2 batteries are in parallel. As visible in my original pics posted I also wondered about the semi circled springy item that sits above the red "ready" light. When in the case it would act as a circuit closure. It's presence there offers no other service I can think of. Perhaps can this be the elusive negative terminal with the other two being positive and in parallel as I suspect? If true that means I would have to solder the 2 terminals together and then join the spring clip and the post together to close the circuit. Yes?
    Last edited by medusa; 08-27-2013 at 05:21 AM.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by medusa View Post
    I connected the red wire ( formerly black) as I assumed it came loose from the bulb connection. There seemed to be no other place it could have come loose from and each side of the bulb would have initially had two connections as witnessed through the original red wires. The flash was working years ago when I was treating myself but the unit got so hot it stopped working. I had assumed the capacitor burned out. I had not started my self education about electronics back then. As I look at the kit again this morning I still am of the opinion that the 2 batteries are in parallel. As visible in my original pics posted I also wondered about the semi circled springy item that sits above the red "ready" light. When in the case it would act as a circuit closure. It's presence there offers no other service I can think of. Perhaps can this be the elusive negative terminal with the other two being positive and in parallel as I suspect? If true that means I would have to solder the 2 terminals together and then join the spring clip and the post together to close the circuit. Yes?
    I highlighted part of your post above which indicates a problem. This is manually triggered flash and relatively low power so it should not get hot. Yes, the capacitor could be a problem which caused an additional issue within a circuit. If would be me I'll look around for another flash, make sure it works first and save myself a headache unless, getting another unit isn't possible for some reason.
    That spring clip should be behind a trigger button,when assembled and it allows to activate flash manually.

    V

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