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How to switch Batteries

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  • How to switch Batteries

    I want to ask Peter, if there a video, PDF, etc I will pay for... It is about how to switch the charging batteries automatically, one feeding the load and the other one charging, and when the charging is done, switch them and the one that was charging will supply the load now, and the one that was supplying the load will be charging now.

    I am sure someone knows about this.

  • #2
    While I haven't built either of these you might try researching the Daftman,

    Manual Battery Switch The Daftman
    Auto Battery Swapper The Daftman

    I don't believe that website is his but those circuits are, he also has some videos detailing such. I'm not Peter, but you are certainly welcome to send me lots of money under the "etc" part of your request. Though it doesn't cover battery swapping, in all seriousness, having purchased it, I heartily and enthusiastically recommend Peter and Aaron's SSG Beginners Handbook. Peter has a real talent for making the complex understandable.
    Last edited by ZPDM; 04-13-2013, 04:21 AM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ZPDM View Post
      While I haven't built either of these you might try researching the Daftman,

      Manual Battery Switch The Daftman
      Auto Battery Swapper The Daftman

      I don't believe that website is his but those circuits are, he also has some videos detailing such. I'm not Peter, but you are certainly welcome to send me lots of money under the "etc" part of your request. Though it doesn't cover battery swapping, in all seriousness, having purchased it, I heartily and enthusiastically recommend Peter and Aaron's SSG Beginners Handbook. Peter has a real talent for making the complex understandable.
      Thanks ZPDM, I apreciated your post, great site!!, haha, yes I will keep you in mind, I bought many things from Peter, and have learn a lot from it, specially the last two books, Beginers and Intermeditate SSG, they have a lot of detail which helps you understand this Bedini thing much better.

      But I wonder as you may too, if Peter will answer this question.

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      • #4
        Thanks for opening this thread! I've had the same question for a while - BTW, thanks also for the Daftman link - I like what he's doing.

        Looks like Daftman is using a regular relay - I've wondered if the way to go wouldn't be to use latching relays. By my calculations, the relay he is using will use around 1 watt of power continuously to remain latched, which will be half of the time. (avg 0.5 watts continuous) If one were to use a latching relay, you would only need to input a pulse to swap the batteries. Depending on how it's built, this could also offer the benefit of allowing the swapping of 3 or more batteries, for no extra cost in power. That way you could always have a bank you're drawing from, another that you're charging, and a third that is resting. (which I understand is important, from John B's work) If you wanted to do this with regular relays, it would require at least 1 relay on all the time, so 1 watt continuous. I haven't yet gotten to the stage where I need one, so haven't built a swapper to try this out.

        Love the books too! They've answered a lot of questions for me!
        Rgds,
        Daniel

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        • #5
          Originally posted by emfimp View Post
          Thanks for opening this thread! I've had the same question for a while - BTW, thanks also for the Daftman link - I like what he's doing.

          Looks like Daftman is using a regular relay - I've wondered if the way to go wouldn't be to use latching relays. By my calculations, the relay he is using will use around 1 watt of power continuously to remain latched, which will be half of the time. (avg 0.5 watts continuous) If one were to use a latching relay, you would only need to input a pulse to swap the batteries. Depending on how it's built, this could also offer the benefit of allowing the swapping of 3 or more batteries, for no extra cost in power. That way you could always have a bank you're drawing from, another that you're charging, and a third that is resting. (which I understand is important, from John B's work) If you wanted to do this with regular relays, it would require at least 1 relay on all the time, so 1 watt continuous. I haven't yet gotten to the stage where I need one, so haven't built a swapper to try this out.

          Love the books too! They've answered a lot of questions for me!
          Rgds,
          Daniel
          Very interesting ! thanks for your feedback, the point is to used the less power consumption possible on the components that we use, or eliminate them complete. I will make note and implemented, as I was thinking the depend on the load, we will need two or more batteries, if the load consumes the battery energy to fast.
          Last edited by TheStone16; 04-27-2013, 01:01 AM.

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          • #6
            Can somebody post a circuit diagram with mentioned functionality?

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            • #7
              Solid state would be even better.
              You only fail when you quit!

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