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  • Hi All,

    My response will have a bit longer intervals in the upcoming weeks since I just picked up another contract job, but I’m still on top of this topic/think about it a lot. But maybe that’s a good thing for Gary and RS, not receiving a full page with questions every second day hahaha.

    @RS_ hope you feel better soon/overcome the infection.
    @Gary, many thanks for your input.

    Output battery
    1.1 When you speak about the “the positive peak of the spike”, I assume you mean the spike as I indicated them in the attachment?
    1.2 The peaks of the blue trace only show one big spike (the radiant event) “p1”* and then a couple of very tiny ones. But all on one side of the battery level (so not changing polarity, just changing in amplitude).
    If I look at the yellow trace from your sniffer coil, in see that the peaks are reducing very gradually and do change polarity.
    So is it correct to state that the yellow sniffer coil trace is only an effect of peak “p1”? (And not following/having a direct relation with the other/smaller peaks of the blue trace).
    1.3 Assuming 1.2 is correct: Why does the sniffer coil trace change polarity and why/what is actually happening here?**



    Input battery
    2.1 When you speak about the “and the negative peak of the spike hammers the primary”, do you mean the spike “p2”*?
    2.2 If 2.1 is correct, and if we call peak p1 the radiant event (moment X from my previous post), then the spike to the input battery does take place after it, as peak p2 happens after p1. (Instead of them taking place at the same time). Correct?
    2.2 As stated in 1.2 the “negative” spike p2 doesn’t change polarity, and therefore I’m struggling with understanding how this “negative” spike spikes to the input battery. What I mean with this is that I’m in my head with your example of the lightning; so as long as the blue trace doesn’t change polarity, the biggest “pressure” difference would still be with the positive pole of the output battery…
    However, you mentioned a couple of times already that I think too much in a “regular” electrical point view. Your statement is back-uped by the fact that the primary battery has no ground connection when the spikes are happening (and also by ref 1 from my post #258, “back to the positive terminal…along one wire”).
    But if I can’t look at it from a perspective of potential/pressure differences, than that brings be back to square one: how does the spike “chooses” to either go to the input or output battery…
    You mentioned that RS may have some input on this too. Looking forward to his response also when he feels a bit better.


    *see attachment
    **If I look on pages 17/21/23 in the book “Free Energy Generation”, I see images/explanation of the ringing as well, also from that it didn’t became particularly clear to me .
    Thanks again,
    best regards,
    Rodolphe

    2020-07-05 attachment.pdf

    Comment


    • Hi Rodolphe,

      1.1 When you speak about the “the positive peak of the spike”, I assume you mean the spike as I indicated them in the attachment?
      Yes, that's what I mean.

      1.2 The peaks of the blue trace only show one big spike (the radiant event) “p1”* and then a couple of very tiny ones. But all on one side of the battery level (so not changing polarity, just changing in amplitude).
      That's not quite a correct observation. p2 is the negative spike and is below the charge battery voltage. The charge battery voltage is the steady blue line after the oscillations die out. Refer back to post 268 .........


      1.2 What determines the voltage level at which section “C” takes place/starts (+/- 18V in my scope reading)?


      I think this would be the charge battery voltage plus whatever voltage drop exists in the charge battery circuit at the time. That voltage drop would consist of the .6 volt forward voltage drop across the diode and any I2R in the wiring.
      If I look at the yellow trace from your sniffer coil, in see that the peaks are reducing very gradually and do change polarity.
      So is it correct to state that the yellow sniffer coil trace is only an effect of peak “p1”? (And not following/having a direct relation with the other/smaller peaks of the blue trace).
      Yes. I think that is correct.

      1.3 Assuming 1.2 is correct: Why does the sniffer coil trace change polarity and why/what is actually happening here?**
      I think this is ringing that occurs in the discharge circuit and charge battery, at the resonant frequency of the battery, as a result of the battery being hit with the sharp radiant voltage spike. The sniffer coil is picking up the magnetic field from current flow (I think) and is not the same as the voltage shown on scope trace 1 (the blue trace).

      2.1 When you speak about the “and the negative peak of the spike hammers the primary”, do you mean the spike “p2”*?
      Yes. That's what I was referring to.

      2.2 If 2.1 is correct, and if we call peak p1 the radiant event (moment X from my previous post), then the spike to the input battery does take place after it, as peak p2 happens after p1. (Instead of them taking place at the same time). Correct?
      Yes. It is a very short lived radiant oscillation that takes place at the level of the discharge battery voltage. Since p2 is below the charge battery voltage, it is somehow reflected back into the run battery as a radiant pulse (I think).

      2.2 As stated in 1.2 the “negative” spike p2 doesn’t change polarity, and therefore I’m struggling with understanding how this “negative” spike spikes to the input battery. What I mean with this is that I’m in my head with your example of the lightning; so as long as the blue trace doesn’t change polarity, the biggest “pressure” difference would still be with the positive pole of the output battery…
      However, you mentioned a couple of times already that I think too much in a “regular” electrical point view. Your statement is back-uped by the fact that the primary battery has no ground connection when the spikes are happening (and also by ref 1 from my post #258, “back to the positive terminal…along one wire”).
      The best I can answer is to repeat the above answer. It is a very short lived radiant oscillation that takes place at the level of the discharge battery voltage. Since p2 is below the charge battery voltage, it is somehow reflected back into the run battery as a radiant pulse (I think).

      But if I can’t look at it from a perspective of potential/pressure differences, than that brings be back to square one: how does the spike “chooses” to either go to the input or output battery…
      I think potential/pressure differences do come into play here since p1 is above the charge battery potential and p2 is below the charge battery potential. The radiant spike hits both batteries at the same time as an oscillation with most of p1 being absorbed by the charge battery and most of p2 being absorbed by the run battery. (The scope trace shows the left over, un-absorbed voltage as explained in a previous post.) The voltage oscillation then dies out very quickly in contrast to the resonant current oscillations happening in the batteries themselves as reflected in the sniffer coil.

      **If I look on pages 17/21/23 in the book “Free Energy Generation”, I see images/explanation of the ringing as well, also from that it didn’t became particularly clear to me .
      You must have the first edition of John's book as the page numbers are different from the second edition, which is the one I have. I think page 17 in yours is where John explains what takes place in the battery. I think this is what shows up in my sniffer coil trace on the yellow channel 2. The other two pages you referenced have to do with the output of the "energizer" as used on his first machines. They resemble the output of an old DC generator as used on old American cars.

      Gary Hammond,




      Last edited by Gary Hammond; 07-12-2020, 07:35 PM.

      Comment


      • Sorry this took so long to post, as most of it was written a few days ago.......


        What you have to realize is, that Ringing in voltage is oscillating the longitudinal spiral wave in the eather from one polarity to the other extremely fast. And is coming directly from the coil's magnetic field collapse. The transistor does not need to be on. Both batteries are immersed in the warped eather around the wires and circuit / coil magnet field, so they both receive some of the ether flow that makes the batteries Ions move in a charge state because of the design of JB's circuits.

        The ether is like a thick Fluid and can be condensed or rarified in its density. The longitudinal spiral wave is alternating rarified and densified waves/area's in the eather. Kind of like waves in the ocean, but not peaks and troughs, rarified and densified waves. This comparatively weak longitudinal spiral wave in the ether may extend out for light years. Making the modern civilization on Earth a VERY Noisy Place in the ether.....



        Tesla & Gabriel Kron says that if a condition is created where the ether develops a flow between two points for a long enough time, it will want to keep flowing for a long time after the power is turned off... and like a swing, just a little push every cycle will keep it flowing for a while. Tesla was doing this in his magnifying transmitter. A SG/SSG does much the same thing.

        This effect can be directly point to point and not just around the wires and circuit. This is a local phenomenon in the ether, and is why Bearden talks about OU devices being moved to a new location, and they are not OU anymore....

        Picture in your mind a wire, say 100Ft long stretched tight, and your looking down the wire from one end. The pic below shows what the ether looks like when warped when voltage is applied.


        golden-spiral-3.png

        the pic below shows the wire vertical, and the warped spiral's from each end of the wire meet in the center. The purple / blue is the magnet field that is created as current begins to flow. The center is where the Bloch wall is in the magnet field.

        emotion3.gif




        Comment


        • Hi Gary, RS,

          Thanks for all your input.

          I did some scope readings myself on my SG, with the second channel being connected to a sniffer coil with which I “sniffed” all the input/output wires. Please see attachment, the questions directly below here refer to it.

          Scope readings
          1 Am I correct when I say: the blue trace measures the voltage IN the wire, while the red trace is an induced voltage based on an induced magnetic field AROUND the wire (aether), which on its turn is created by a voltage AROUND (aether) the wire. In other words: what happens IN the wire has a relation to what happens outside it, but it is not the same thing, otherwise I would expect the same that the blue and red trace would show the same pattern (but of a difference in amplitude/magnitude).
          1.1
          The voltage oscillation then dies out very quickly in contrast to the resonant current oscillations happening in the batteries themselves as reflected in the sniffer coil.
          Do I understand you correctly that here (in the battery) the voltage is not too quick for the amperage to participate too? When I think about oscillation I image something going up and down, as you see in the red trace, but the net effect of the current (in the battery) must be in one direction or nothing is being charged, correct?


          2 In all the measurements it shows that the amplitude of the red trace of the negative wire is always higher than the positive wire. What conclusion can be drawn from that?

          3 You both mentioned that the spike going back to the input goes accompanied with more amperage than the spike going to the output. I do not see this resembled in the any of the graphs. The red trace (around the wire/aether?) actually looks the same for both the input and the output wires. In case the red ringing trace would be an indication for how much the battery is charged, then that would mean both batteries receive the same amount of charging (but that might be a wrong assumption/conclusion).
          Gary, you mentioned that in post #268 that I would see a smaller ringing signal at the input side (comparing positive to positive wire, or negative to negative wire), but the small difference I see I think is caused by the wire/sniffer coil in both situation not being exactly in the same orientation/position.
          The blue trace (in the wire) is smaller in amplitude for the input wire, but I don’t see peak p2 (from my previous post) being wider. Can you comment on this? (as I will mention below, having straight what is the cause of what might change my perception of this).

          3.1 Gary, you mentioned that the peak p2 (from my previous post) is responsible for effects in the primary battery. Same question/comment as above; I do not see this clearly resembled in the traces on the scope. With your statement, I was expecting that the start the of the red trace of the input wires would be offseted more to the right. But maybe I’m connecting the wrong phenomenon to the wrong conclusion here.

          That's not quite a correct observation. p2 is the negative spike and is below the charge battery voltage.
          For me correctly picturing this in my head, what might be important for me is to have straight what is the cause of what. My initial thought/reasoning here was, that although the voltage in the spike and following ripples changes in amplitude (e.g. 300V, 10V, 14V, V11, 12V), they don’t change polarity in the sense of positive/negative (e.g. +300V, -xxV, +xxV, -xxV, +12V). But maybe that is again too much thought in relation with normal current flow etc.
          If I image a transverse wave in the aether being the primary cause, compressing and expanding… that brings things in a different perspective.


          You must have the first edition of John's book as the page numbers are different from the second edition, which is the one I have. I think page 17 in yours is where John explains what takes place in the battery. I think this is what shows up in my sniffer coil trace on the yellow channel 2. The other two pages you referenced have to do with the output of the "energizer" as used on his first machines. They resemble the output of an old DC generator as used on old American cars.
          I have the second edition too. You’re correct, the image on page 21 is refed to by the story before it regarding the energizer, but after that in continues with the battery also in relation to it. Page 23 you’re correct too (I just looked to quickly here).

          Best regards,
          Rodolphe

          2020-07-12 - attachment.pdf

          Comment


          • Hi Gary, RS,

            In this post in wanted to go a bit deeper into some things you mentioned in previous posts RS.

            The Tesla idea here is, that if you can turn on the voltage (either warp) long enough to transfer that voltage potential to something (Cap / Battery) before current flows, and turn it off really fast, it transfers that Voltage Charge Potential to the target before current flow happens
            I’m trying to see this in connection with the SG in radiant mode (without cap dump circuit) and also with what is written on the bottom of page 67 / top of page 68 of FEG*. Bearden starts here with “Combining, there are two parts to the radiant energy engineering Principe: a static part and a dynamic part.”
            Then he talks about both the static principle and the dynamic principle. Since it is all so theoretical, what I first struggle with to understand is: Are both these static AND dynamic principles taking place?
            E.g. the static part via the primary battery potentializing the Coil, and then the dynamic part where the primary is disconnected and the radiant spike is fed to the output battery (and a bit to the input as well)? Or is the dynamic part really/only taking place inside the battery?

            *Book Free energy generation, 2nd edition

            I was talking about this topic too with Gary in this thread, post #246 (question 3a) / #245.

            Tesla & Gabriel Kron says that if a condition is created where the ether develops a flow between two points for a long enough time, it will want to keep flowing for a long time after the power is turned off...
            I read about this in the book “Basic principles of overunity" by Jovan Marjanovic. There was an experiment mentioned where a machine was sped up to operation speed, which costed a certain amount of energy. When the machine was then stopped and started again within a certain time frame, it costed less energy to start the machine up again.

            This effect can be directly point to point and not just around the wires and circuit. This is a local phenomenon in the ether, and is why Bearden talks about OU devices being moved to a new location, and they are not OU anymore....
            That surprises me, I would understand that the machine would need some time to “change” the local aether in a certain condition that is needed for the machine to operate correctly. But that I wouldn’t function at all in certain places… I guess then the aether at that location would be very different from the original location. Maybe underground in a mine of a certain metal…

            Best regards,
            Rodolphe
            Last edited by pearldragon; 08-03-2020, 04:47 AM.

            Comment


            • Hi Rodolphe,

              I did some scope readings myself on my SG, with the second channel being connected to a sniffer coil with which I “sniffed” all the input/output wires. Please see attachment, the questions directly below here refer to it.

              Scope readings
              1 Am I correct when I say: the blue trace measures the voltage IN the wire, while the red trace is an induced voltage based on an induced magnetic field AROUND the wire (aether), which on its turn is created by a voltage AROUND (aether) the wire. In other words: what happens IN the wire has a relation to what happens outside it, but it is not the same thing, otherwise I would expect the same that the blue and red trace would show the same pattern (but of a difference in amplitude/magnitude)
              I think that's pretty close to correct, but what you are calling "voltage in the wire" I think of as being "voltage between the ends of the wire"?
              what happens IN the wire has a relation to what happens outside it, but it is not the same thing
              I think that is correct.

              Do I understand you correctly that here (in the battery) the voltage is not too quick for the amperage to participate too? When I think about oscillation I image something going up and down, as you see in the red trace, but the net effect of the current (in the battery) must be in one direction or nothing is being charged, correct?
              The applied voltage spike is quick and the current (electron flow) can't keep up (inductive reactance). There are several different things happening within the battery in a short period of time with each being affected by the others. It is a complex series of events, some of which are simultaneous. Here's a list of the main components involved. electrons, H+ ions, OH- ions, Pb+ ions, and SO4- ions. The large ions move very slowly compared to the electrons with the result that several different "currents" and "chemical exchange processes" are going on within the electrolyte between the plates and also within the plates themselves. This results in several different electromagnetic fields interacting in the presence of resistance, inductive reactance, and capacitive reactance. This is what sets up the (ringing) oscillations between the battery and the external circuit, which is picked up by the sniffer coil.

              The ringing oscillations taken together produce more total charge transfer (charging) than a steady current flow caused by a steadily applied voltage would. It is also speculated that the large ions continue flowing after the ringing stops, due to their physical mass and inertia. This then results in electron flow in the opposite direction and is seen as "the battery charging itself".

              2 In all the measurements it shows that the amplitude of the red trace of the negative wire is always higher than the positive wire. What conclusion can be drawn from that?
              The negative wire has a stronger EM field associated with it than the positive wire for some reason. I don't know what that reason is. Maybe better coupling with the aether on the negative side of the battery???

              3 You both mentioned that the spike going back to the input goes accompanied with more amperage than the spike going to the output. I do not see this resembled in the any of the graphs. The red trace (around the wire/aether?) actually looks the same for both the input and the output wires. In case the red ringing trace would be an indication for how much the battery is charged, then that would mean both batteries receive the same amount of charging (but that might be a wrong assumption/conclusion).
              RS_ and I may have not been totally correct in our explanations. But what I do see is that the first peak of the ringing red trace of the sniffer coil on the run battery is inverted from the first peak on the charge battery. If the charging takes place only on the positive peaks seen on the negative lead, then the first peak to the Run battery is in the wrong direction to charge. And it is the second, (smaller peak) that is in the charge direction resulting in all the remaining positive (charge direction) peaks to be smaller than the comparable positive (charge direction) peaks in the charge battery leads. This would result in less overall charging of the run battery compared to the charge battery. You also need to remember that any charging of the run battery has to reverse the processes already in motion within the battery left over from the pulsed run current. The charge battery, however, doesn't have any run current to reverse.

              Gary, you mentioned that in post #268 that I would see a smaller ringing signal at the input side (comparing positive to positive wire, or negative to negative wire), but the small difference I see I think is caused by the wire/sniffer coil in both situation not being exactly in the same orientation/position.
              I probably made an incorrect observation of my set up, and may have been comparing the trace on the output negative lead to the input positive lead. This was from my memory, which has become somewhat less reliable as I've aged!

              The blue trace (in the wire) is smaller in amplitude for the input wire, but I don’t see peak p2 (from my previous post) being wider. Can you comment on this? (as I will mention below, having straight what is the cause of what might change my perception of this).
              I don't understand this question??

              3.1 Gary, you mentioned that the peak p2 (from my previous post) is responsible for effects in the primary battery. Same question/comment as above; I do not see this clearly resembled in the traces on the scope. With your statement, I was expecting that the start the of the red trace of the input wires would be offseted more to the right. But maybe I’m connecting the wrong phenomenon to the wrong conclusion here.
              Same answer as above. .................... RS_ and I may have not been totally correct in our explanations. But what I do see is that the first peak of the ringing red trace of the sniffer coil on the run battery is inverted from the first peak on the charge battery. If the charging takes place only on the positive peaks seen on the negative lead, then the first peak to the Run battery is in the wrong direction to charge. And it is the second, (smaller peak) that is in the charge direction resulting in all the remaining positive (charge direction) peaks to be smaller than the comparable positive (charge direction) peaks in the charge battery leads. This would result in less overall charging of the run battery compared to the charge battery. You also need to remember that any charging of the run battery has to reverse the processes already in motion within the battery left over from the pulsed run current. The charge battery, however, doesn't have any run current to reverse.

              For me correctly picturing this in my head, what might be important for me is to have straight what is the cause of what. My initial thought/reasoning here was, that although the voltage in the spike and following ripples changes in amplitude (e.g. 300V, 10V, 14V, V11, 12V), they don’t change polarity in the sense of positive/negative (e.g. +300V, -xxV, +xxV, -xxV, +12V). But maybe that is again too much thought in relation with normal current flow etc.
              If I image a transverse wave in the aether being the primary cause, compressing and expanding… that brings things in a different perspective.
              Yes they do change polarity with respect to the charge battery voltage. The positive going peaks are above the battery voltage, and the negative going peaks are below the battery voltage as I pointed out in previous posts #268 and #272.

              If you reverse your scope leads over the coil, this is much easier to see.

              Gary Hammond,
              Last edited by Gary Hammond; 07-12-2020, 07:52 PM.

              Comment


              • Hi Gary,

                Thanks for all your feedback!

                The negative wire has a stronger EM field associated with it than the positive wire for some reason. I don't know what that reason is. Maybe better coupling with the aether on the negative side of the battery???
                Regarding this, I was looking at my attachment of post #274 again, looking at the Red trace of M1 and the Red trace of M4, and then again at the schematic of the SG. I then had the following thoughts:
                The negative of the output battery and the positive of the input battery are directly connected… so I would expect that the sniffer coil signal would look exactly the same… and it does, except for the amplitude.
                Then the question arose (looking at the red trace of the M4): Am I looking here at a ringing at the terminal of the input battery? Or am I actually seeing the ringing of the terminal of the output battery, but just lower in amplitude because there is more wire to “dampen” the amplitude (compared to M1)?
                But if the above would be true, than I would not expect to see the same oscillation patterns, but mirrored, in the red traces of M2 and M3.
                Then I reversing this train of thought: Because the red traces of M2 and M3 are the mirrored image of M1 and M4, I do not understand why M1 and M4 look like they do, because the terminals are hardwired together (would expect to see the same signal). Just some thoughts .


                If the charging takes place only on the positive peaks seen on the negative lead, then the first peak to the Run battery is in the wrong direction to charge. And it is the second, (smaller peak) that is in the charge direction resulting in all the remaining positive (charge direction) peaks to be smaller than the comparable positive (charge direction) peaks in the charge battery leads. This would result in less overall charging of the run battery compared to the charge battery.
                If that hypotheses is true, then yes, the primary would receive less charge I assume.


                I don't understand this question??
                What I meant with this, is that in the previous posts you and RS mentioned that the spike to the input battery would be accompanied with more amperage, but with the peak p2 not being wider than peak p1 (which I would expect if more amperage was involved) I didn’t see the higher amperage resembled in that (or any other) in my scope reading. But this you addressed already in your other replies.

                Yes they do change polarity with respect to the charge battery voltage. The positive going peaks are above the battery voltage, and the negative going peaks are below the battery voltage as I pointed out in previous posts #268 and #272.
                And being above or below the nominal battery voltage determines in which direction the polarity is aimed and/or current would flow (if it has enough time to catch up with the rapid changes). However, current could not reverse since the diode would prevent it… so it is just a polarity switch then I reckon.

                With regards to tuning the SG, am I correct in saying that the SG is optimal tuned if the rpm /frequency of the radiant pulses are as close as possible to a (lower) harmonic of the resonant frequency at which the ringing in the battery takes place?

                Best Regards,
                Rodolphe

                Comment


                • Hi RS,

                  Looking again at your post #273 and its pictures:
                  Does this mean that if wires (specially the thick input/output ones) are positioned to close to each other, or even worse, crossing each other, this interferes with this aether shapes around them?
                  In other words; would a SG with the input/output wires crossed and chaotically positioned be outperformed by an SG where these wires are spaced as far from each other as possible?


                  Best regards,
                  Rodolphe

                  Comment


                  • Hi Rodolphe,

                    The negative of the output battery and the positive of the input battery are directly connected… so I would expect that the sniffer coil signal would look exactly the same… and it does, except for the amplitude.
                    Then the question arose (looking at the red trace of the M4): Am I looking here at a ringing at the terminal of the input battery? Or am I actually seeing the ringing of the terminal of the output battery, but just lower in amplitude because there is more wire to “dampen” the amplitude (compared to M1)?
                    I think you are confusing the red signals from the sniffer coil with voltage at the terminals. The sniffer coil measurements are caused by EM induction from current flow in the wire being sniffed. This is resonance in the battery and that portion of the circuit. The battery terminal voltages are shown in the blue traces, at a totally different frequency, which I think is the resonate frequency of the coil. You can readily see this in M1.1 thru M4.1 .

                    I do not understand why M1 and M4 look like they do, because the terminals are hardwired together (would expect to see the same signal). Just some thoughts .
                    The sniffer coil is responding to two different currents in two different circuit branches connected at a node. I'm not sure which battery is controlling the resonate frequency or if the frequency just appears the same because the batteries are nearly identical. I always assumed that the charge battery controlled the frequency, but that may not be correct?

                    With regards to tuning the SG, am I correct in saying that the SG is optimal tuned if the rpm /frequency of the radiant pulses are as close as possible to a (lower) harmonic of the resonant frequency at which the ringing in the battery takes place?
                    Sounds reasonable, but I really don't know for sure.


                    Comment


                    • Yes in some cases 2 wires with various frequency signals on them too close together or crossing can interfere with each other, as this changes the inductance between them.
                      Think Twin Lead antenna hookup cable, the 2 wires are held at a exact distance apart, to create a specific inductance for that cable.

                      For most applications 2-4in is far enough apart to keep interference from happening.

                      Comment


                      • Hi Gary, RS,

                        Thanks for your input.

                        @Gary,
                        I think you are confusing the red signals from the sniffer coil with voltage at the terminals. The sniffer coil measurements are caused by EM induction from current flow in the wire being sniffed. This is resonance in the battery and that portion of the circuit. The battery terminal voltages are shown in the blue traces, at a totally different frequency, which I think is the resonate frequency of the coil. You can readily see this in M1.1 thru M4.1
                        Yes, I guess. Another way of formulating it the would be that the red is the “ringing around” the wires (based on what’s happening in the battery). While the blue trace shows what’s happening in the wires (based then on the coil)?
                        I’m still find it a very peculiar phenomenon that around that wire a signal is sniffed that is so different from the signal in the wire itself… this SG is a strange beast…


                        The sniffer coil is responding to two different currents in two different circuit branches connected at a node. I'm not sure which battery is controlling the resonate frequency or if the frequency just appears the same because the batteries are nearly identical. I always assumed that the charge battery controlled the frequency, but that may not be correct?
                        Based on what you wrote, two additional tests that would be interested to do then are:
                        -measure M1 and M4 again with the sniffer coil, but this time as close to the node as possible (=input/output connections of SG). And see how this affect the signals. My expectation then would be that the signals are going to look more alike (more the same amplitude).
                        -measure M1 and M4 again with the sniffer coil, but this time with input/output batteries that are more different. E.g. flooded lead @ input, AGM @ output. Or 2x AGM @ input and 1x AGM @ output.
                        Since I’m ready to test with my new rotor (20 magnets), I might do these tests and report back here.


                        @RS,
                        My input/output terminals on my SG are already spaced below 2”, just measured it, +/-20mm. And the wires going to the batteries normally cross at some point at least once. I’ll see if from now on I can keep these wires a bit more separated then…
                        In case you want to/feel for it, I would be keen to talk a bit more with your regarding my post #275.


                        Best regards,
                        Rodolphe

                        Comment


                        • Hi Rodolphe,

                          Yes, I guess. Another way of formulating it the would be that the red is the “ringing around” the wires (based on what’s happening in the battery). While the blue trace shows what’s happening in the wires (based then on the coil)?
                          I’m still find it a very peculiar phenomenon that around that wire a signal is sniffed that is so different from the signal in the wire itself… this SG is a strange beast…
                          It's important to remember that the o-scope only measures voltage difference between the two points it's connected to.

                          Looking at M6 the red signal is the voltage difference measured between the ends of the sniffer coil, which is inductively coupled to the wire. So this shows the current ringing in the wire connected to the positive terminal due to input battery resonance. ........... And the blue trace is the radiant voltage spike, applied across the battery terminals, that comes from the aether surrounding the entire circuit as shown by RS_ in post #273. So the blue trace shows what's happening in the "space around the circuit" (voltage) and the red trace shows what's happening in the wire itself (oscillating current).

                          If you compare this to M5, the ringing in the input battery negative lead is inverted from the positive lead and is at a higher amplitude. So this means that more current is oscillating in the negative lead than in the positive lead even though both are responding to the same voltage spike hitting the battery thru the aether. I think this is an example of the lamilar (sp) currents Gabriel Kron wrote about that happen in different branches of the same circuit between different nodes. In this case the battery is both a node, a capacitor, an inductor, a resistor, and an electrolyte all at the same time with several internal branch circuits, two external branch circuits, and coupling to the aether.

                          And while this is going on with the input battery, the same thing is going on in the battery receiving the "output" but at a higher level. And even though some charging occurs in the input battery, it still has to supply the run current. So it eventually will run down over time.

                          When you've been trained in classical physics and electron theory like I have been, these are difficult concepts to wrap your mind around. I have finally began to realize there were some errors in what I've been taught and believed for several years, and there is more still to be learned.

                          Gary Hammond,

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                          • Rodolphe,

                            Not sure how you are using the sniffer coil.... You can put the SSG output lead through the center of the sniffer coil vs just holding it near the output wire.
                            Another trick is to use a strong neo magnet in your hand held next to the output wire and you can feel the signal in the wire through the magnet, and any other wires in the circuit just for fun.
                            JB almost always made his PCB's one sided only, because of the crossing traces on two sided PCB's caused interference.... And one sided PCB's are real easy to hand make compared to two sided PCB's

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                            • Hi Gary, RS,

                              @RS
                              It's important to remember that the o-scope only measures voltage difference between the two points it's connected to.
                              Looking at M6 the red signal is the voltage difference measured between the ends of the sniffer coil, which is inductively coupled to the wire. So this shows the current ringing in the wire connected to the positive terminal due to input battery resonance. ........... And the blue trace is the radiant voltage spike, applied across the battery terminals, that comes from the aether surrounding the entire circuit as shown by RS_ in post #273. So the blue trace shows what's happening in the "space around the circuit" (voltage) and the red trace shows what's happening in the wire itself (oscillating current).
                              So actually completely opposite of how I wrote it hahaha. But I’m understanding (somewhat) what you say, reading RS’s pos #273 again helped with this too. Thanks.
                              Hope to do the tests I mentioned in post #281 to clear things up some more.


                              And while this is going on with the input battery, the same thing is going on in the battery receiving the "output" but at a higher level. And even though some charging occurs in the input battery, it still has to supply the run current. So it eventually will run down over time.
                              Whether it runs down or not, depends also on the setup of the SG in question I guess. What I mean is that the EFV DVD34-4, the input battery doesn’t get depleted either if I remember correctly.


                              @RS
                              Not sure if we’re understanding each other correctly here:
                              I my previous post I was just referring to the thick wires going to/from the batteries to/from the SG: after your post, I started to space them, rather then having them laying randomly around (more often than not crossing each other at least once…)
                              Regarding the sniffer coil:
                              I would think you should not put the wire you want to “sniff” through the middle of the coil, since the sniffer coil needs to be perpendicular to the wire? For the setup I use, see attachment.
                              I use the TeslaGenX PCB (just the PCB, not the kit): http://www.teslagenx.com/kits/tx-sg8.html?category=kits


                              Best regards,
                              Rodolphe

                              2020-08-04 attachment.pdf

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