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New Medium Sized Machine

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  • Hello group,
    Today I am posting a run on a Walmart deep cell trolling battery. I did this one in gen mode, it took about eighteen hours. I did not use the Aurduino duty cycle trick from the last video, mostly because I do not have more genny coils for the machine yet. I can harvest a little off the back genny coil but it's not really enough to do much with so I have just moved the coil up out of the way and am running normally for now.

    This run is not showing anything new really accept maybe a look at a run using the home built lifePO4 pack as the primary. I mostly just wanted to post because there are not many people posting runs.

    Here are the batteries:
    clack_ssr6_2_batt.jpg

    And the charts:
    clack_ssr6_2_chg.JPG

    clack_ssr6_2_pri.JPG

    And a short video showing the start, middle and end of the run:
    https://1drv.ms/v/s!AmzmftzD-V0miGShXbIRyU6nOIHN

    Comment


    • Originally posted by BobZilla View Post
      Hello group,
      Today I am posting a run on a Walmart deep cell trolling battery. I did this one in gen mode, it took about eighteen hours. I did not use the Aurduino duty cycle trick from the last video, mostly because I do not have more genny coils for the machine yet. I can harvest a little off the back genny coil but it's not really enough to do much with so I have just moved the coil up out of the way and am running normally for now.

      This run is not showing anything new really accept maybe a look at a run using the home built lifePO4 pack as the primary. I mostly just wanted to post because there are not many people posting runs.

      Here are the batteries:
      [ATTACH=CONFIG]6183[/ATTACH]

      And the charts:
      [ATTACH=CONFIG]6184[/ATTACH]

      [ATTACH=CONFIG]6185[/ATTACH]

      And a short video showing the start, middle and end of the run:
      https://1drv.ms/v/s!AmzmftzD-V0miGShXbIRyU6nOIHN
      Hi Bob,
      Nice video... liked that Graphometer software...could you let me how i could download that..i need for my experiments..
      Rgds,
      Faraday88
      'Wisdom comes from living out of the knowledge.'

      Comment


      • Hi Faraday,
        Unfortunately that software is a proprietary package that was bundled with the old radio shack digital meters which I don't think they sell anymore. If you have the meter I can give you the software but without the meter it won't do any good.

        If you are looking for a way to chart on your computer I would suggest DATAQ products. These are pretty nice solutions at a good price. Be aware that the lower end models only accept up to 10v so to use it with our types of systems you make a voltage divider on the input and set the calibration. That is what I did with mine and it works fine that way.

        Check out these starter kits if your interested.

        https://www.dataq.com/data-acquisition/starter-kits/

        Comment


        • Originally posted by BobZilla View Post
          Hi Faraday,
          Unfortunately that software is a proprietary package that was bundled with the old radio shack digital meters which I don't think they sell anymore. If you have the meter I can give you the software but without the meter it won't do any good.

          If you are looking for a way to chart on your computer I would suggest DATAQ products. These are pretty nice solutions at a good price. Be aware that the lower end models only accept up to 10v so to use it with our types of systems you make a voltage divider on the input and set the calibration. That is what I did with mine and it works fine that way.

          Check out these starter kits if your interested.

          https://www.dataq.com/data-acquisition/starter-kits/
          Bob
          Nice video, are you triggering it with arduino or something else?
          Also on the Dataq, do you mean it only measures up to 10 volt.
          Thank you

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Brian McNece View Post
            Bob
            Nice video, are you triggering it with arduino or something else?
            Also on the Dataq, do you mean it only measures up to 10 volt.
            Thank you
            Hi Brian,
            It is triggered from a pair of reed switches and a 6volt battery, in the video you see that little battery off to the left? The negative side of that is running through the reeds to trigger the SSR's. The wheel on the front is the trigger for those reeds so as the magnet goes by it closes the switch which opens the relays. The video I posted just before this one did use the aurduino to produce a duty cycle but essentially worked the same way. Hope that makes sense.

            For the meter, yes the cheaper ones max out at 10v. So what you do is make a voltage divider with resistors. You can calculate it out so that your cutting the source in half or by 4 times, whatever you need. For example I make mine to be a 40v max meter so that I can measure both batteries and cap voltages with it. To do that I need to make a voltage divider that takes 40v and reduces it to 10v(because that is the max input for the meter). Then in the meter software you change the calibration so that 10v=40v.

            So if I take a 10k resistor and a 30k resistor to make a divider I will be reducing 40v to 10. See the calculator below and try out some numbers. If you used a 10k and a 10k resistor you have an exactly halved output so you could go up to only 20v. It may sound complicated but its really as simple as two resistors.

            Anyone actually trying this should get the best tolerance resistors you can get so that it is as accurate as possible ( 1% or better).

            http://www.ohmslawcalculator.com/vol...der-calculator
            Last edited by BobZilla; 03-15-2017, 06:13 PM.

            Comment


            • A little trick we used to do to increase the accuracy of a carbon resistor was to make small perpendicular cuts with a hacksaw to make small increases in resistance. I would then seal the cuts to keep them from deteriorating with a touch of clear fingernail polish I kept in my toolbox for that purpose. One thing I would recommend is starting with at least half watt resisters until you get some experience.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by BobZilla View Post
                Hi Faraday,
                Unfortunately that software is a proprietary package that was bundled with the old radio shack digital meters which I don't think they sell anymore. If you have the meter I can give you the software but without the meter it won't do any good.

                If you are looking for a way to chart on your computer I would suggest DATAQ products. These are pretty nice solutions at a good price. Be aware that the lower end models only accept up to 10v so to use it with our types of systems you make a voltage divider on the input and set the calibration. That is what I did with mine and it works fine that way.

                Check out these starter kits if your interested.

                https://www.dataq.com/data-acquisition/starter-kits/
                Thanks Bob! will check on the link you sent will let you know if i need some more help in this regard.
                Rgds,
                Faraday88.
                'Wisdom comes from living out of the knowledge.'

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Michael Luton View Post
                  A little trick we used to do to increase the accuracy of a carbon resistor was to make small perpendicular cuts with a hacksaw to make small increases in resistance. I would then seal the cuts to keep them from deteriorating with a touch of clear fingernail polish I kept in my toolbox for that purpose. One thing I would recommend is starting with at least half watt resisters until you get some experience.
                  Nice trick, I like it ;-)


                  I'll tell you what else that little bottle of nail polish can help with,,,, If you ever get a scratch on your magnet wire you can paint a little nail polish on to repair the enamel insulator.


                  Faraday,
                  No problem. The only down side is that you pretty much need to dedicate the PC for the meter while using it ( or a really long USB cable). I have a cheap desktop that I bought only for my meters. It doesn't need to be a very powerful machine, the refurbished office class PC's work fine for this purpose.

                  Comment


                  • You can also use it to secure variable resistors and variable capacitors with a drop on the adjustment head although for that I prefer colored. Keeps your adjustment from changing do to vibration or temperature variations. Lot cheaper than the "Locktite" version especially when one of your female friends give you an old bottle that is not good for doing nails anymore. But it can lead to some ribbing from others when you keep fingernail polish in your toolbox, at least until they realize how good the idea is.

                    Comment


                    • Bob,

                      Appreciate the video, I'm being a bit of a lazy as here but then again you have a great set-up to look at this rigorously. What do you think of my idea to put some colloidal silver in a LA battery to provide a silver nano-coating when radiantly charged? I'll probably try to go to the recycling center (aka Dump) to get a refillable LA battery this week and work to recondition but even so I don't have the graphing software and consistent machine set-up and you have done a lot with different battery types so thought I might try and interest you

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by ZPDM View Post
                        Bob,

                        Appreciate the video, I'm being a bit of a lazy as here but then again you have a great set-up to look at this rigorously. What do you think of my idea to put some colloidal silver in a LA battery to provide a silver nano-coating when radiantly charged? I'll probably try to go to the recycling center (aka Dump) to get a refillable LA battery this week and work to recondition but even so I don't have the graphing software and consistent machine set-up and you have done a lot with different battery types so thought I might try and interest you

                        Hmm, I'm not to sure on this one. I think I will let you try it first ;-)

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by BobZilla View Post
                          Hmm, I'm not to sure on this one. I think I will let you try it first ;-)
                          Aw, come on Aright I'll make a trip out to the "recycling center" and see what I can find for batteries, but if this works real well I might tell you it stinks. Besides I haven't had any colloidal silver for a month or two and maybe placebo but I feel good on the stuff.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by BobZilla View Post
                            Hi Brian,
                            It is triggered from a pair of reed switches and a 6volt battery, in the video you see that little battery off to the left? The negative side of that is running through the reeds to trigger the SSR's. The wheel on the front is the trigger for those reeds so as the magnet goes by it closes the switch which opens the relays. The video I posted just before this one did use the aurduino to produce a duty cycle but essentially worked the same way. Hope that makes sense.

                            For the meter, yes the cheaper ones max out at 10v. So what you do is make a voltage divider with resistors. You can calculate it out so that your cutting the source in half or by 4 times, whatever you need. For example I make mine to be a 40v max meter so that I can measure both batteries and cap voltages with it. To do that I need to make a voltage divider that takes 40v and reduces it to 10v(because that is the max input for the meter). Then in the meter software you change the calibration so that 10v=40v.

                            So if I take a 10k resistor and a 30k resistor to make a divider I will be reducing 40v to 10. See the calculator below and try out some numbers. If you used a 10k and a 10k resistor you have an exactly halved output so you could go up to only 20v. It may sound complicated but its really as simple as two resistors.

                            Anyone actually trying this should get the best tolerance resistors you can get so that it is as accurate as possible ( 1% or better).

                            http://www.ohmslawcalculator.com/vol...der-calculator
                            Bob
                            Do you need a voltage divider for each channel/input?
                            I am considering one of these dataq loggers.
                            Last edited by Brian McNece; 04-26-2017, 03:31 AM.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Brian McNece View Post
                              Bob
                              Do you need a voltage divider for each channel/input?
                              I am considering one of these dataq loggers.
                              Yes you need one per channel.

                              I also recommend making a few sets depending on what you think you may want to monitor. You will have better accuracy the closer you spec the resistors for your target voltage. What I mean is you may want to make a set that is exactly half which will go up too 20V battery and be most accurate on normal 12v batteries but what if you want to do a series run, well that set wont work so make some that can handle 40v for that situation. It would be less accurate on your 12v runs which is why you may want a few sets. See what I mean, tailor them to be the closest you can for what you want to monitor.

                              It's very cheap to make, you just need some cable, the resistors and some gator clips. Small zip cord works good or you can use some cat5 Ethernet cable which is nice because when you strip it you have 4 pairs of wire with four colors, blue/orange/green/brown inside.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by BobZilla View Post
                                Yes you need one per channel.

                                I also recommend making a few sets depending on what you think you may want to monitor. You will have better accuracy the closer you spec the resistors for your target voltage. What I mean is you may want to make a set that is exactly half which will go up too 20V battery and be most accurate on normal 12v batteries but what if you want to do a series run, well that set wont work so make some that can handle 40v for that situation. It would be less accurate on your 12v runs which is why you may want a few sets. See what I mean, tailor them to be the closest you can for what you want to monitor.

                                It's very cheap to make, you just need some cable, the resistors and some gator clips. Small zip cord works good or you can use some cat5 Ethernet cable which is nice because when you strip it you have 4 pairs of wire with four colors, blue/orange/green/brown inside.
                                Thanks Bob

                                Comment

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