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My Mode 3 - In action

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  • #16
    Hats off to you for tackling the arduino Bob! I bought one for the very same reason....The cap dump!!! I have fried more components trying to get a reliable cap dump circuit working over the last 6 months and then I heard about these wonderful micro controllers. It took me a while to get the hang of programming it but there's no looking back now. Cap dump, frequency meter, back popper, oscillator driver, battery swapper...It's all possible now.

    it's funny that you mentioned the radiant energy released when a switch closes. I'm not 100% sure but when my cap discharges, I'm seeing what looks like a radiant spike extending downwards on the scope for about 4 volts. In other words my cap discharges at 30 volts down to 23 volts for under 1 ms then jumps back up to 27 volts after that 1 ms and ramps back up to 30 volts from there. I didn't see this with my other dumping setups. Maybe I wasn't driving the mosfet gate high enough?

    I've only had the setup working for a few weeks or so and I've dumped caps from 750uf at an insane rate to .4F with this thing and man what a difference. When I dumped the .4F cap the noise was somthing to behold. usually a cap dump sounds like a clock tick but when the energy hit the batteries, it sounded more like a loud clock TOCK. It scared the hell out of me and I immediatly shut it down.I thought the batteries were going to explode.I don't recomend working with these monster caps unless you know exactly what you are doing. I don't ...so for now I'll just stay alive, put them aside and work with the little guys.

    The thing I find most usefull about using the arduino cap dump and it's frequency meter is you can play the "what if" game. I'm using it to evaluate the different components of the oscillator by keeping the input current constant and noting the frequency of the cap dump. Then you can try different diodes, coils, cores, caps, transistors...etc and immediatly see if your change is good or bad by an increase or decrease in cap dump frequency. It's amazing what affects the sg oscillator. Just touching certain wires or hooking meters or scope probes will change the dump frequency.

    A friendly suggestion for you Bob is rather than using a time based cap dump maybe use a voltage based dump. I'm using a zener diode to set the max cap voltage (an input to the arduino through an opto) and code the output to dump when the arduino sees the input. so far it seems to be very stable and repeatable but best of all....no smoke. The reason I say this is i don't know about you but I have a drawerfull of caps that have been blazed by way more voltage than they are rated for simply because of my time based cap dumps either failing or I started the system with the wrong timing. The voltage based dump always dumps at the same voltage no matter what size cap you use and you can choose when to deactivate the output in the code to dump at a fraction of a volt or all the way down to battery voltage.

    I have to ask you Bob where you got that wonderful software that graphs the battery charging curve I saw in your video?

    Very impressive setup Bob.

    Emp

    Comment


    • #17
      Yea I thought about running a system as you suggest, a true comparator. I know it can be done with Arduino and I may try that out down the road. The way I am doing it has advantages too though. If you really look closely at what I am doing with what I have termed "dancing" you will see that this results in multiple voltages per cycle. Basically you have the big dump and then several trailing dumps at mixed times, a little bit longer or shorter from the previous. I do this intentionally. With a comparator you would have a same state dump each time, unless you coded a second sub-cycle within your loop. As you have said SO much is possible with the programming.

      You are absolutely right about little things changing, as you said add a meter here or touch a wire there. In fact I get much better results when I am not running any meters on the system. Of course for these videos I have to put them in or there is nothing too see ;-) ,, but it is best not to have any meters. I know my machine very well and I can tune it pretty much by ear now. For example when in generator mode the best thing is to get it to the best RPM you can and then release just a little resistance. What happens is the RPM goes down a little but you can hear the coil buzzing a bit. You only want to adjust it slightly in that direction, too much just wastes energy but if you do it right you get much more output. It also throws an AC wave toward the primary, not much but it is there and it can help the primary from running down quite so fast.

      I generally like original mode 1 better but this thread is focused mostly on mode 3 which is gen mode with cap dumping so that is what I am showing.

      The software comes with the meter you see. It is a Radio shack digital meter, they are about $80. Well worth it for people like us who play with meters all the time. If you get one just be careful about programing your Arduino and running the meter at the same time. I have found that they start to have a problem. I think they try to use the same memory block. I started using yet another little laptop I have for programing the Arduino.

      Good to hear from you. It's nice to see someone else tinkering along the same lines as me. ---Bob

      Comment


      • #18
        Now I get it
        - Thanks


        Originally posted by BobZilla View Post
        Ok guys I have a new curve ball to throw to you ;-)

        After much testing and changing things around I have a little improvement too the setup.

        I have been exploring this idea of triggering more dipole events on the cap, same idea as before but I have figured something out.

        What I have done is make a new cap dump board with only one mosfet and I upgrade the diode to a fast switching 8 amp diode. I wanted cleaner switching and I figured the four mosfets on the other board were probably not triggering at the same time, same issue we have with matching transistors. I am getting a little heat now because it is only one mosfet but it is still not bad, about 20 degrees over the rest of the circuit components. That is not the thing I want to share but it is worth mentioning for anyone keeping track of how this system is setup.

        What I want to share is that I have figured out how to get these dipole events to appear on the cap with repetition and they are producing 400v spikes. This is what I was trying for all along and now I can actually see it happening on my meter.

        The key to what I am doing is first off I have to dump on at least 40v in the cap or the large spikes do not appear. The challenge with my system is that it is not strong enough to keep that large cap (60,000uf) in there and still dump with enough frequency to move the battery very well. I can hold it back for 6 seconds and get enough charge but dumping once per 6 seconds does not move the battery very well. As usual it is all a matter of tuning. I had to swap out to a smaller cap arrangement.

        I have a 1000uf on it currently which charges up to about 45v in 250ms, then I dump for 250ms, then some “dance pulses” 55,65,35 and then it repeats. Because I am now working with such a small capacitance I had to decrease the amount of dance pulses. I can take this idea farther when I get my stronger machine built. This shows up on the Amp meter as about a 1A dump to the battery, not very much but it is happening nearly twice a second.

        What I have observed for good cap dumping in general is that the dumps must happen with a certain speed or the battery will not move very well. It can change depending on the target battery but generally quicker seems better. You want to size your cap to be able to charge to whatever voltage you like BUT it must be able to do it fast enough. When I have a stronger machine I can double or triple the cap size and still keep the short charge time for the cap but for now I have to downsize to accommodate this method I am trying.

        The key to what I am presenting in this update is that to get the really nice 400V spikes you need to dump on at least 40v. I tried dialing back the frequency with various caps and on every configuration I did not see these large spikes until I was going over 40v. I tried it with the 60k cap, could do it but only if I let the charge build for 6 seconds. I tried it with a 15k, again had to let it build for about 2.5 seconds. I see the best charging if I keep the dump cycle at one second or less so the only way to do it was to downsize the cap until I could achieve that cycle rate ( with this machine).

        I had hopes of charging large batteries with this machine but I just don’t think it can accommodate. I can charge garden tractor batteries and small AGM’s no problem but my 75AH and 100AH are not going to do it on this machine. I mean I can get it to charge them but it takes way too long for my liking. I am fine with it though. I have a ton of small batteries and this machine is fine for them. It has been a great experimenting platform and now I want to scale up with what I am learning from it.


        Here you see a chart of the cap voltage. It is dumping at 46v or so but the dipoles are contributing 400v, over and over! I need to do much more testing but this is what I have been looking for. I am pretty happy with this performance. Remember the chart only samples once per second so there are things happening that it does not always catch.


        Again this is charting directly off the CAP to watch the dump cycle.

        (The forum pictures hosting is not working so I am hosting these on my web storage. If you click the "download" button you will get a much better resolution than the preview on the link, same for video.)

        https://files.secureserver.net/0swaxIKnzM6zZW


        And here is the charge curve for the same period. The target battery is the same garden tractor one I used in the beginning of this post. It was not dead to start but not charged either. It was resting at about 12.52v The primary draw is just over 1A, maybe 1.10 – 1.18, again there is a little bouncing on the meter.

        https://files.secureserver.net/0sn6GrW3lCW2pz

        Here is another video so you can see it in action.

        https://files.secureserver.net/0sq3iS0e5LrwVt


        It is too early to say really if this is of great benefit but I am happy that I am able to produce the effect at will. I think what I may do is compare some runs like this and then lower my cap dump down to about 35V, just under where the spikes appear to see what effect it has on charging, and the primary. I have to believe that inducing these 400v spikes contributes to the gains but more testing to come.

        SO many ways to tune these circuits! ------Bob

        Comment


        • #19
          You bet...

          I tweaked the process a bit more after this was posted but you get the main idea.

          The part about the 40v and 400v,, it is true but I did not continue using that in the more advanced dancing. In that other vid you can see what I was using at the time, basically a larger dump with trailing dance pulses, then a small dump with less trailing, and a few more same way, then back to a larger one. I did find that by changing amplitudes it seems to shake things up a bit better than just the same repetition. Sort of a combination of the code I posted above and the other I showed.

          Anyway it was not the final setup, I had shared this to get people thinking and that other vid was a simple code that could be understood what I was doing. Once you understand the principal you can make much more elaborate timing code.

          Comment


          • #20
            Hi Bob,
            reading this
            made me think of you and this thread.
            Cheers,
            Patrick A.


            Originally posted by BobZilla View Post
            You bet...

            I tweaked the process a bit more after this was posted but you get the main idea.

            The part about the 40v and 400v,, it is true but I did not continue using that in the more advanced dancing. In that other vid you can see what I was using at the time, basically a larger dump with trailing dance pulses, then a small dump with less trailing, and a few more same way, then back to a larger one. I did find that by changing amplitudes it seems to shake things up a bit better than just the same repetition. Sort of a combination of the code I posted above and the other I showed.

            Anyway it was not the final setup, I had shared this to get people thinking and that other vid was a simple code that could be understood what I was doing. Once you understand the principal you can make much more elaborate timing code.

            Comment


            • #21
              Sounds interesting, I might need to read that a few more times to understand what is being said though.

              I don't want to sound mysterious or coy but not everything I have learned gets posted. I generally will post fundamental aspects and leave the rest for someone to play with if they wish. There are many ways to expand on the "cap dancing" method I described but the basic idea is what I presented.

              I tell you what that reminds me off in a way,, the EARLY work that Mr. Bearden put out in reference to Mr. Bedini's methods. Especially the idea of fast switching and separating the ION flow and the Electron flow into separate open paths. You can charge and run a load at the same time with proper switching. Sometimes we get lucky and hit a sub harmonic. Part of what I was doing in some of my suggestions with varying your pulse rather than the same thing over and over was with that in mind, if your really lucky you may hit the proper frequency and tickle sub harmonics of it too.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by BobZilla View Post
                Greetings friends,

                I have an interesting concept I am working with for cap-dumping and I wanted to share.

                Before I get to the charts and video I want to explain what I am trying to accomplish and the theory behind it.

                Mr. Bedini told a story of Mr. Tesla observing the radiant energy rushing in on the old DC power plant transmission lines. The condition for this was that the generators were already up and running with high voltage but the knife switch had not been thrown to start the distribution from the generator to the endpoints. Well we know that it doesn’t really come from the generator (thanks to Mr. Bearden) but that is not the point.

                What is described is the condition where you have a voltage potential without current flow. The radiant flows in just before the current begins moving, when the distribution switch was thrown. It only lasts for a VERY short period of time that exists before the slower current can start to move behind the radiant.

                With the very high voltages of those old power plant generators it was described that they could actually see the energy suck in towards the line and display massive arcs. We cannot see this behavior in our systems but it is there.

                Now with that understanding I want to explain what my experimental cap dump method is doing. I started out playing with different timing loops for dumping the same as everyone else. I found what seemed to work the best and was pretty happy with my results. Then I started thinking about the heart of the matter, dipoles! This is where the magic happens both on the cap dumps and within the SG circuit all forms of radiant harvesting are one way or another tricking dipoles into giving up some energy.

                My system is an attempt to maximize dipole contribution. I knew that each dump from the cap was producing a dipole event but could this be improved? YES, I think it can!

                In my system think of the capacitor as the power plant, it is sitting there with a voltage potential greater than the charge battery, and for periods it is not moving current. The Mosfets take the place of the knife switch on the distribution lines. What I am doing is giving a charge period on the cap and dumping it with a somewhat short period, that is the first phase but there is more. I have it timed so that the cap does not give up all of its potential in that first dump. As it is dumping I switch it off, then on for a very short period, off again, on again, many times before the first phase repeats.

                The idea is to create a charge with phase one and then distribute it by rapidly throwing the switch which creates many dipole events per single charge pump cycle. We have to raise the potential to charge but we do not have to release it all at once. I want to harvest as many dipoles as I can out of that initial charge on the cap.


                It results in about a 2A pulse, and then many 1A or less pulses trailing the primary pulse very rapidly. I envision it like a tap dancer on the capacitor; he activates the dipole once with a hard step and then tickles it many more times lightly. Each time the circuit makes and breaks the dipole to allow more radiant to flow in (in theory).

                Of course we have no meters for radiant to prove that this is working but from my understanding of Mr. Tesla’s observation I am creating a mini power plant (the cap) with an insanely fast switch operator (micro controlled Mosfets), on a much smaller scale.

                In addition to the basic principal I am intentionally creating a time-shift in the “dance” pulses. Some are 65, 75, 85, 125. I do this with the idea that this energy has been said to be like a gas, or a liquid if it’s easier to think of that way. I am creating abnormal amplitude changes by manipulating the time.

                Imagine if you could look at some ripples on water from a 2d side perspective. If they all came at exactly at the same time say 50/50, and you could only see a narrow view at the lowest point on the wave. This would always look the same amplitude and if you could only harvest that energy from that single perspective you may be missing the best potential at the top of the wave right? So by changing up the time on my “waves” I am creating a moving center point where I think it is more likely for varying degrees of energy to enter. To put it another way I do not want a perfect wave over and over, I am mixing it up to allow for a greater potential.

                Here is the code I am using to make these dipole events happen. The cap dumper is driven by an Arduino micro controller. I have a 5AH supply battery running it which is isolated from the rest of the circuit. It draws only about 45ma to power the board and fire the Mosfet gates.

                int mosfet = 4;
                void setup() {
                pinMode(mosfet, OUTPUT);}
                void loop() {
                digitalWrite(mosfet, LOW) ;
                delay (600) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, HIGH) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, LOW) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, HIGH) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, LOW) ;
                delay (75) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, HIGH) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, LOW) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, HIGH) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, LOW) ;
                delay (85) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, HIGH) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, LOW) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, HIGH) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, LOW) ;
                delay (125) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, HIGH) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, LOW) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, HIGH) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, LOW) ;
                delay (175) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, HIGH) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, LOW) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, HIGH) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, LOW) ;
                delay (75) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, HIGH) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, LOW) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, HIGH) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, LOW) ;
                delay (85) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, HIGH) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, LOW) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, HIGH) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, LOW) ;
                delay (125) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, HIGH) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, LOW) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, HIGH) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, LOW) ;
                delay (175) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, HIGH) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, LOW) ;
                delay (65) ;
                digitalWrite(mosfet, HIGH) ;
                delay (65) ;
                }

                One thing to note is that the shortest time in the system is 65ms. This is because the Mosfets can not switch properly if I try to go any shorter, they are fast but do have a limit.

                I am still experimenting heavily with the proper timing and how many events to try and trigger but the basis of the theory is there.

                The cap is being charged to 23v and falls back to about 18v before the cycle repeats. The primary draw is about 1.2A, it bounces around with the cap discharges so it is hard to say exactly. I also did this run on the fixed resistor instead of the pot which makes it draw harder at first but as the primary voltage drops so does the draw. I usually use the pot and make adjustments as the primary draws down.

                The chart looks a little choppy on the curve because of the odd timings involved. The meter only samples once per second so we are catching it in the chart at different phases of the cycle.

                Here is a chart of 17AH AGM, but it has been flooded. This is a salvaged battery that I have converted to a wet cell. I could have stopped the charge many hours before I did but I think this particular battery could still use some conditioning so I let it run a bit long. It is hard to see on the chart but the battery was dead to start, about 12.1v. I should have put a long rest period before starting but I forgot to do that. As the chart builds it shrinks up and it is hard to see the starting voltage.

                [ATTACH=CONFIG]2741[/ATTACH]

                And finally I have a video for those interested in seeing this in action. Look closely at the Amp meter and you will see the “dancing”. I am also showing the RPM and temp checks on the components. Note that this machine is running in generator mode as shown by Mr. Bedini in part 33 DVD. This system is tuned well and I have virtually no heat. I do not think I needed the heat sinks but they are already attached. The diode on the dump board gets a few degrees above the rest of the components but that is about it.

                https://files.secureserver.net/0s5hQtZsNYxa5F

                Thanks----Bob
                Hi Bob,
                I have much respect for your work as well. I'ld love to replicate and scope out this cap dump event. I've never used an arduino. Would you have any suggestions on were to start? My preference would be to match your build as closely as possible.


                Here is a vid, the purpose of the vid was NOT to show the pre-spike but it does:

                Comment


                • #23
                  Hi Patrick,

                  I would be more than happy to help you with anything you may have questions on. The stuff in this thread is old and probably half ripped apart or in a junk drawer, geez I have tons of that kind of thing going on around here.

                  I still build all sorts of aurduino controlled stuff though and I probably know quite a bit more now than I did back when I was posting this. Do not be intimidated by the idea of having to program the MC, for cap dumps or SS switching it is super simple. There are a lot of things you can do beyond switching with them but just start off with using it as a switch. All your really doing is defining an on time and an off time and if you want to make the dipole dancing you just make more off and on commands. The whole thing plays in a loop and that's it, trust me it's really easy.

                  It depends on if your cap dumping or driving a SS as to how you want to time things. For example lets say we want to cap dump. To be on the safe side we would set the ON period pretty long and the off period very short and then start adjusting from what we observe. The reason is if we are feeding our cap too fast we don't want it to overfill so a long on time will pass it through to the battery, as we shorten up that on time the cap will fill faster because it is stacking up the voltage for longer then the on period dumps that. Conversely the off period being short does the same thing in a way, the point is you want to start out conservative and find the rate that your cap charges and then tune to it. You will quickly get a feel for it. Now if your using it to switch a SS setup then a long off and a really short on is how to start. This is so that with the really short on time you do not over saturate the coil, then you can walk up your on time and or decrease the off time to tune in.

                  To give you an idea of what I look for in a coil to run a SS on I will generally want a coil that if connected full on can pull about 5 or so amps. I don't want to run at 5A but by testing it that way I know that it will offer the right resistance and have a decent capacitance. The truth is though that with the MC you can tune for just about any coil you just have to dial it in.

                  Depending on if you want to make a small'ish unit or a large one you are going to need a few things. you can either use FETS or SSR's. I have used both and they both work well but I am partial to the SSR's these days. I use 40A crydom d1's for large setups, meaning my charge target will be between 60-200AH banks. For smaller stuff you can get cheap SSR's that are rated at 4A or use a FET. Just make sure whatever device you choose to use that it's trigger side is low voltage (usually it will be 3-30V) the MC can only put out 5v@20ma so make sure the device will respond to that. I prefer to put a diode on my cap dumps so that the battery cannot feed back towards the cap, not completely necessary but I like it that way and it prevents sparks when you hook up to a battery, without that the cap sucks off the battery and you get a spark.

                  I am going to shoot some video for you to show some of the things I have made with the MC and how they work. I think I am better at explaining stuff when I'm looking at it and talking about it.

                  For cheap MC I order them from this link below. It takes awhile for them to arrive from china but I have never recieved a dud from them and the price is right.

                  Link:
                  https://www.fasttech.com/products/1001700

                  Here are the cheap SSR I have been using. Again this would be for small stuff, mostly for driving a SS coil and not so much for dumping but if small enough it would work.
                  Link:
                  http://www.ebay.com/p/Input-3-32v-DC...-B3/1242205384

                  The crydom 40A SSR are very expensive and you can find them on mouser or digi-key but sometimes you can find listings for salvage deals.

                  Anyway I am going to make that video for you so be sure to check back---Bob

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by BobZilla View Post
                    Hi Patrick,

                    I would be more than happy to help you with anything you may have questions on. The stuff in this thread is old and probably half ripped apart or in a junk drawer, geez I have tons of that kind of thing going on around here.

                    I still build all sorts of aurduino controlled stuff though and I probably know quite a bit more now than I did back when I was posting this. Do not be intimidated by the idea of having to program the MC, for cap dumps or SS switching it is super simple. There are a lot of things you can do beyond switching with them but just start off with using it as a switch. All your really doing is defining an on time and an off time and if you want to make the dipole dancing you just make more off and on commands. The whole thing plays in a loop and that's it, trust me it's really easy.

                    It depends on if your cap dumping or driving a SS as to how you want to time things. For example lets say we want to cap dump. To be on the safe side we would set the ON period pretty long and the off period very short and then start adjusting from what we observe. The reason is if we are feeding our cap too fast we don't want it to overfill so a long on time will pass it through to the battery, as we shorten up that on time the cap will fill faster because it is stacking up the voltage for longer then the on period dumps that. Conversely the off period being short does the same thing in a way, the point is you want to start out conservative and find the rate that your cap charges and then tune to it. You will quickly get a feel for it. Now if your using it to switch a SS setup then a long off and a really short on is how to start. This is so that with the really short on time you do not over saturate the coil, then you can walk up your on time and or decrease the off time to tune in.

                    To give you an idea of what I look for in a coil to run a SS on I will generally want a coil that if connected full on can pull about 5 or so amps. I don't want to run at 5A but by testing it that way I know that it will offer the right resistance and have a decent capacitance. The truth is though that with the MC you can tune for just about any coil you just have to dial it in.

                    Depending on if you want to make a small'ish unit or a large one you are going to need a few things. you can either use FETS or SSR's. I have used both and they both work well but I am partial to the SSR's these days. I use 40A crydom d1's for large setups, meaning my charge target will be between 60-200AH banks. For smaller stuff you can get cheap SSR's that are rated at 4A or use a FET. Just make sure whatever device you choose to use that it's trigger side is low voltage (usually it will be 3-30V) the MC can only put out 5v@20ma so make sure the device will respond to that. I prefer to put a diode on my cap dumps so that the battery cannot feed back towards the cap, not completely necessary but I like it that way and it prevents sparks when you hook up to a battery, without that the cap sucks off the battery and you get a spark.

                    I am going to shoot some video for you to show some of the things I have made with the MC and how they work. I think I am better at explaining stuff when I'm looking at it and talking about it.

                    For cheap MC I order them from this link below. It takes awhile for them to arrive from china but I have never recieved a dud from them and the price is right.

                    Link:
                    https://www.fasttech.com/products/1001700

                    Here are the cheap SSR I have been using. Again this would be for small stuff, mostly for driving a SS coil and not so much for dumping but if small enough it would work.
                    Link:
                    http://www.ebay.com/p/Input-3-32v-DC...-B3/1242205384

                    The crydom 40A SSR are very expensive and you can find them on mouser or digi-key but sometimes you can find listings for salvage deals.

                    Anyway I am going to make that video for you so be sure to check back---Bob
                    Bob
                    I appreciate your willingness to help out so much, i am looking forward to this video, i also have interest in the MC.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Hi Brian,
                      Glad to help if you get anything from it. I have shot a video here to start off with. In this I am going over the parts on my cap dumper and showing the basics of how to program the MC. This alone is enough for you guys to build one yourselves if you wanted to but I think I will make more videos. It's just to much to try and cover in one session so if you guys like this let me know and I can elaborate on more settings.

                      This first video is necessary just to explain how the machine is setup.

                      https://1drv.ms/v/s!AmzmftzD-V0miF7YL2aqJ_HtvbKr

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by BobZilla View Post
                        Hi Brian,
                        Glad to help if you get anything from it. I have shot a video here to start off with. In this I am going over the parts on my cap dumper and showing the basics of how to program the MC. This alone is enough for you guys to build one yourselves if you wanted to but I think I will make more videos. It's just to much to try and cover in one session so if you guys like this let me know and I can elaborate on more settings.

                        This first video is necessary just to explain how the machine is setup.

                        https://1drv.ms/v/s!AmzmftzD-V0miF7YL2aqJ_HtvbKr
                        Hi Bob,
                        Nice! Thanks for the Vid good to know you can get the effect with the SSR. I have more consistency when I use that as apposed to trying to get the FET's to turn off at these speeds. Arduino on the way, maybe next week...
                        I'm going to add this to my pre-spike setup C watts up :-)
                        KR - Patrick

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by min2oly View Post
                          Hi Bob,
                          Nice! Thanks for the Vid good to know you can get the effect with the SSR. I have more consistency when I use that as apposed to trying to get the FET's to turn off at these speeds. Arduino on the way, maybe next week...
                          I'm going to add this to my pre-spike setup C watts up :-)
                          KR - Patrick
                          Just have time for a quick comment, I'm on lunch. You probably know it already but if you do maybe it helps for others to hear,, for FETS to switch fast I recommend a 10kOhm resistor placed between the gate and the source pins. It helps to quickly drain the capacitance out of the gate junction by bleeding it off to ground which gets you that fast off.

                          I will shoot another video on the cap dumper to show a few different speeds and such, maybe tonight or at least next few days.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by BobZilla View Post
                            Hi Brian,
                            Glad to help if you get anything from it. I have shot a video here to start off with. In this I am going over the parts on my cap dumper and showing the basics of how to program the MC. This alone is enough for you guys to build one yourselves if you wanted to but I think I will make more videos. It's just to much to try and cover in one session so if you guys like this let me know and I can elaborate on more settings.

                            This first video is necessary just to explain how the machine is setup.

                            https://1drv.ms/v/s!AmzmftzD-V0miF7YL2aqJ_HtvbKr
                            Bob
                            Thank you for shooting the video, very interesting, i am looking forward to more explanation on this, i think i will definitely be ordering an arduino very soon, i was checking out the site you mentioned in an earlier post, seems very reasonable priced.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Alright so I am back with another part 2 video. In this one I walk the machine through a few short charge/discharge cycles. In each charge I took one of the caps out of the dumpers circuit so we are looking at increasing the voltage and lowering the capacitance with each step as a result.

                              Here are the charts:
                              stressTest_charge_1.JPG

                              stressTest_capV_1.JPG

                              The video is another sort of long one but it shows a little bit of each cycle as it's happening and has my ramblings. ---Bob

                              https://1drv.ms/v/s!AmzmftzD-V0miF8q406cus6LiO2w

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Thank you for the time and effort you put into making this video (and all your videos). What you are doing and your results were very clear to me. The only thing is, I do not consider your comments as rambling as I found them very helpful and direct. It will take some time for my mind to chew on everything I saw and how to apply to my own pet projects.

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