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Charging 3 105 AH batteries with SSG

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  • Faraday88
    replied
    Originally posted by Faraday88 View Post
    Here is My Dual monopole in action.https://youtu.be/ZgmTgCfRLVg
    The Dual coils allow the batteries to be charged in Parallel or in Series (Branch current)
    This particular set up is designed for parallel charging a set of 4 batteries.
    Load testing and COP calculation underway...Qualitatively though the batteries seem to give out more the more you load them (kind of a anti-Puerkt law) and charge right up faster (DC Resistive load) this is in premise with what JK said in his post earlier.
    Thanks Aaron/JK
    Rgds,
    Faraday88.
    The Dual coils allow the batteries to be charged in Parallel or in Series (Branch current)
    This particular set up is designed for parallel charging a set of 4 batteries.
    Load testing and COP calculation underway...Qualitatively though the batteries seem to give out more the more you load them (kind of a anti-Puerkt law) and charge right up faster (DC Resistive load) this is in premise with what JK said in his post earlier. attached CBA discharge profile @C20 rate. This Battery measured 12.29V when purchased. I was looking for batteries in the range 13.25V or above since these would reliably of good quality. to my surprise the gel cells in the shop were all in the same range of 12.35-40V
    Over the years the quality of these gel cells have declined. None of the previous batteries I purchased have stood up the test for a capacity test.
    Thanks Aaron/JK
    Rgds,
    Faraday88.[/QUOTE]
    April 12 2019.jpg

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  • Faraday88
    replied
    Originally posted by Faraday88 View Post
    Thanks Aaron for your comments and inputs on the above, i shall post my experimental observations next after a try out the full patent,
    Tesla Nodes, and the branch current that are the next course of actions for these trials.
    Rgds,
    Faraday88.
    Here is My Dual monopole in action.https://youtu.be/ZgmTgCfRLVg
    The Dual coils allow the batteries to be charged in Parallel or in Series (Branch current)
    This particular set up is designed for parallel charging a set of 4 batteries.
    Load testing and COP calculation underway...Qualitatively though the batteries seem to give out more the more you load them (kind of a anti-Puerkt law) and charge right up faster (DC Resistive load) this is in premise with what JK said in his post earlier.
    Thanks Aaron/JK
    Rgds,
    Faraday88.
    Last edited by Faraday88; 04-10-2019, 11:36 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gary Hammond
    replied
    Hi all,

    I spent most of this afternoon running my SSG with the "split-the-negative" four 105AH battery rotation set up some more. It was pulling 84 LEDs from the two genny coils as well, and running about 210 RPM with double spikes to the charge battery. All four batteries were fully charged at the start ranging from 12.96 to 13.02 volts. As stated previously in this thread, these batteries are too large for this machine to top off at 15 volts. However I remember John suggesting that when doing load tests to stay within the normal working voltage range for maximum COP.

    So I decided to run each cycle for only 6 minutes to see what would happen. I ran each battery through four complete rotations (16 cycles of 6 minutes each). Each battery under charge started out climbing from 12.9 volts to 13.4 volts and on the last rotation they were all climbing to 13.5 volts in six minutes. So they were maintaining charge and even gaining a little.

    My conclusion is that it was giving me a little bit over-unity and maintaining charge running this way similar to keeping a trickle charger on them all the time. I do periodically top them all off to 15 volts with my 10A12 charger, but they always drop back to just under 13 volts after a few days.

    I load tested one of them about 4-1/2 months ago at the C20 rate and it put out 104 AH. I will load test again to see if they are losing, gaining, or maintaining capacity.

    Leave a comment:


  • Faraday88
    replied
    Originally posted by Aaron Murakami View Post
    That's interesting - the long time understanding is that batteries charged with spikes like on a SSG should not be rotated to the front because they're not good with inductive loads, which the SSG definitely is. The spikes have to be converted to positive energy first by taking the spikes to a capacitor then dumping the cap to the output battery. John's original term for that is "Forward Conversion". Then, the batteries will be fine for both kinds of loads and can be cycled to the front of the energizers as well as being totally compatible with conventional chargers.
    Thanks Aaron for your comments and inputs on the above, i shall post my experimental observations next after a try out the full patent,
    Tesla Nodes, and the branch current that are the next course of actions for these trials.
    Rgds,
    Faraday88.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aaron Murakami
    replied
    Originally posted by Faraday88 View Post
    Hi Aaron,
    Yes, they are Resitive loads 100W X 5 Nos.(500W). I remember JB saying it in his 2nd DVD that SSG (10Coiler video) Charged batteries are very good for running DC Motors (brushed) which is perhaps same as using a sine-wave inverter to run loads and recharge the front.
    I have experienced this too with Inductive loads like a PMDC Motor performs very well with kind of gain in torque.
    I guess Full patent would do even better..my next experiment now.
    Rgds,
    Faraday88.
    That's interesting - the long time understanding is that batteries charged with spikes like on a SSG should not be rotated to the front because they're not good with inductive loads, which the SSG definitely is. The spikes have to be converted to positive energy first by taking the spikes to a capacitor then dumping the cap to the output battery. John's original term for that is "Forward Conversion". Then, the batteries will be fine for both kinds of loads and can be cycled to the front of the energizers as well as being totally compatible with conventional chargers.

    Leave a comment:


  • Faraday88
    replied
    Originally posted by Aaron Murakami View Post
    What kind of load are you talking about? Inductive or resistive? The radiant charged batteries work phenomenally well with resistive loads. They can sometimes act goofy with inductive loads.

    But like John said, most of what you explained is from overloading the battery from my experience.
    Hi Aaron,
    Yes, they are Resitive loads 100W X 5 Nos.(500W). I remember JB saying it in his 2nd DVD that SSG (10Coiler video) Charged batteries are very good for running DC Motors (brushed) which is perhaps same as using a sine-wave inverter to run loads and recharge the front.
    I have experienced this too with Inductive loads like a PMDC Motor performs very well with kind of gain in torque.
    I guess Full patent would do even better..my next experiment now.
    Rgds,
    Faraday88.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aaron Murakami
    replied
    Originally posted by Faraday88 View Post
    Thanks JK! How fast and safey can we Radiantly charge the Battery? suppose its a100Ah battery (deep cycle flodded) consideringa de-rating factor and effective capacity of 96Ah and say a rate of C5 charging and discharge rate of 5hr (19.2A Load current). is that the maximum one can go?
    Also, I have seen an interesting behavior with the SG charged battery.. A fully charged Battery when subjected to the load dips down in the terminal Voltage very fast up to a point and then starts to rise up from there and kind of oscillate in this fashion. Now, is'nt that a characteristic to the Radiant Kind of Charging?
    Rgds,
    Faraday88.
    What kind of load are you talking about? Inductive or resistive? The radiant charged batteries work phenomenally well with resistive loads. They can sometimes act goofy with inductive loads.

    But like John said, most of what you explained is from overloading the battery from my experience.

    Leave a comment:


  • Faraday88
    replied
    Originally posted by John_Koorn View Post
    I'd always suggest the C20 charge/discharge rate if you can. You can get away with pushing it harder every now and then but for a deep cycle I'd never push it harder than C10.

    Remember that heat is your enemy. Heat = wasted energy and shorter lifetime. Keep it cool, keep it forever

    As for your "interesting behaviour", I've seen that too. I have no idea if it's a by-product of radiant charging. I've usually put it down to loading the battery too hard at the start.

    John K.
    Thanks JK for the clarification.
    Rgds,
    Faraday88.

    Leave a comment:


  • John_Koorn
    replied
    Originally posted by Faraday88 View Post
    Hi JK,
    My set up is already showing up increased Capacity (just 2 cycles of Charge -discharge)and decrease in Charge up time! i think it will get better and better until a platue of saturation is reached. My charging section is not yet at the planned 19.2A rate though.Currently im charging the bank(ofcourse SSG) at 5 A rate and its charging quicker than the previous cycle!
    Im little worried about the Bank temperature when i go for the 19.2A rate.I anticipate there will be thermal runaway at the Cold-boiling regime accompanied with it. your inputs appreciated please..
    Rgds,
    Faraday88.
    Faraday,

    Same as last post - I think you will kill that battery at a C5 rate. Stick to C20 and you can't go wrong. If you haven't read Peter's "Battery Secrets" yet, I thoroughly recommend it.

    Let nature run it's course...

    John K.

    Leave a comment:


  • John_Koorn
    replied
    Originally posted by Faraday88 View Post
    Thanks JK! How fast and safey can we Radiantly charge the Battery? suppose its a100Ah battery (deep cycle flodded) consideringa de-rating factor and effective capacity of 96Ah and say a rate of C5 charging and discharge rate of 5hr (19.2A Load current). is that the maximum one can go?
    Also, I have seen an interesting behavior with the SG charged battery.. A fully charged Battery when subjected to the load dips down in the terminal Voltage very fast up to a point and then starts to rise up from there and kind of oscillate in this fashion. Now, is'nt that a characteristic to the Radiant Kind of Charging?
    Rgds,
    Faraday88.
    I'd always suggest the C20 charge/discharge rate if you can. You can get away with pushing it harder every now and then but for a deep cycle I'd never push it harder than C10.

    Remember that heat is your enemy. Heat = wasted energy and shorter lifetime. Keep it cool, keep it forever

    As for your "interesting behaviour", I've seen that too. I have no idea if it's a by-product of radiant charging. I've usually put it down to loading the battery too hard at the start.

    John K.

    Leave a comment:


  • Faraday88
    replied
    Originally posted by John_Koorn View Post
    Hi Faraday,

    I've only seen the charge time decrease on perfectly good battery that is repeatedly putting out it's maximum capacity (i.e fully rejuvenated). Bedini always said that once the battery gets used to being radiantly charged the time to charge it does decrease.

    John K.
    Hi JK,
    My set up is already showing up increased Capacity (just 2 cycles of Charge -discharge)and decrease in Charge up time! i think it will get better and better until a platue of saturation is reached. My charging section is not yet at the planned 19.2A rate though.Currently im charging the bank(ofcourse SSG) at 5 A rate and its charging quicker than the previous cycle!
    Im little worried about the Bank temperature when i go for the 19.2A rate.I anticipate there will be thermal runaway at the Cold-boiling regime accompanied with it. your inputs appreciated please..
    Rgds,
    Faraday88.
    Last edited by Faraday88; 12-20-2018, 02:42 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Faraday88
    replied
    Originally posted by John_Koorn View Post
    Hi Faraday,

    I've only seen the charge time decrease on perfectly good battery that is repeatedly putting out it's maximum capacity (i.e fully rejuvenated). Bedini always said that once the battery gets used to being radiantly charged the time to charge it does decrease.

    John K.
    Thanks JK! How fast and safey can we Radiantly charge the Battery? suppose its a100Ah battery (deep cycle flodded) consideringa de-rating factor and effective capacity of 96Ah and say a rate of C5 charging and discharge rate of 5hr (19.2A Load current). is that the maximum one can go?
    Also, I have seen an interesting behavior with the SG charged battery.. A fully charged Battery when subjected to the load dips down in the terminal Voltage very fast up to a point and then starts to rise up from there and kind of oscillate in this fashion. Now, is'nt that a characteristic to the Radiant Kind of Charging?
    Rgds,
    Faraday88.
    Last edited by Faraday88; 12-19-2018, 10:06 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • John_Koorn
    replied
    Originally posted by Faraday88 View Post
    John/Aaron,

    Just wondering, Should not an increase in Capacity (by SG) every cycle also increase the time taken to charge the same battery when the same charge rate current is used?(Primary ) or does it work counter intuitive fashion?
    Rgds,
    Faraday88.
    Hi Faraday,

    I've only seen the charge time decrease on perfectly good battery that is repeatedly putting out it's maximum capacity (i.e fully rejuvenated). Bedini always said that once the battery gets used to being radiantly charged the time to charge it does decrease.

    John K.

    Leave a comment:


  • Faraday88
    replied
    Originally posted by John_Koorn View Post
    Hi Aaron,

    Yes, 15.8v comes from the Battery Bible. In reality I don't think I've ever seen a deep cycle flooded lead acid top out at that voltage. Low 15's is what I generally see too. Sorry if I implied that 15.8v was mandatory.

    I have a 100Ah deep cycle that I'm rejuvenating (Century N70T) that I picked up at the local dump. After the first charge I only got 6Ah out of it on a 1A discharge and when charging it would top out at around 13.5v. After 27 cycles I'm up to 67Ah on a 3.3A discharge. It tops out at around 14.6v but each cycle gets just a little bit higher.

    I'm still using my CBA II after all these years. It's the most used tool I own. That dip in voltage when charging is critical, especially for rejuvenating batteries. It's also a great indicator that your charger is capable of fully charging the battery.

    John K.
    John/Aaron,

    Just wondering, Should not an increase in Capacity (by SG) every cycle also increase the time taken to charge the same battery when the same charge rate current is used?(Primary ) or does it work counter intuitive fashion?
    Rgds,
    Faraday88.

    Leave a comment:


  • Faraday88
    replied
    Originally posted by Aaron Murakami View Post
    Ok, I get what you're saying. I've never seen that happen.

    When the CBA-IV is connected to a battery, the battery is such a low impedance path for the radiant that the battery just sucks it up like a sponge and it doesn't make it to the cba or other meter - from what I've experienced.

    This is the same reason that a 2A12 cap dump or even a spike charger on a car battery that is still hooked up to the cables on a car will not damage the car computer and other electronics. The battery sucks it up and it will never make it elsewhere. I won't guarantee that so if anyone fries their care computer, etc. it's their own responsibility - I'm just saying I've never seen those problems.
    Sure you are correct..just that Murrphy's law lurks every where lol!!
    Rgds,
    Faraday88.

    Leave a comment:

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