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160 Amp solar Tracker 5

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  • #16
    Branch,

    its a tracker 5, that is all they are building now. its a linear regulated amp so as your inverter or whatever device pulls a load the current is diverted from the battery. when the load exceeds the batteries charge needs the battery begins to supply what the tracker cannot. the charging is not paused because of anything in the tracker, its just a matter of the load. you put your loads right on the trackers output posts.

    Tom C
    Last edited by Tom C; 01-23-2014, 01:32 AM.


    experimental Kits, chargers and solar trackers

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    • #17
      Yes 50 amp load on half the batteries and still supplying full charge. As long as your panels can supply it. This is not the largest unit that can be done.

      Comment


      • #18
        The Solar Tracker can run split loads and still charge the battery. this is how you would do it. This is a 24 Volt System it.


        The limit is the solar panels that is what you must consider.
        John
        Solar Track hookup.JPG
        Last edited by John_Bedini; 01-23-2014, 03:38 PM. Reason: info
        John Bedini
        My homepage: http://johnbedini.net

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        • #19
          So..I have the 10A Solar Tracker...and bought this panel a couple weeks ago: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Grape-Sol...i_src=17588969

          It puts out 7.81 amps. I am using a 12V inverter.

          Question is...will I see any charging benefit to wiring additional panels in series? If I wire any more in parallel obviously I will go over the max amperage tolerated by the solar tracker.

          Or would the only benefit be to wire two of them together if I was using a 24V inverter?

          p.s. OCV is 37.2V
          Last edited by Branch Gordon; 01-23-2014, 05:00 PM.

          Comment


          • #20
            Branch,
            I do not know what Solar Tracker you have so I can not answer the question, If it is a tracker 5 then you can supply the load to the batteries. If you look at the drawing you can see that it splits the battery bank for two 12 volt systems, but we are talking a big system. I only run 12 volts at home and use a tracker 80 amp, I always use the biggest tracker then I can always add more panels if I need them. Only the tracker 5 systems will let you do this, as the tracker will supply the load not touching the battery unless it drops out because of clouds, then the batteries must supply the load. So what charger do you have? If you have an older one it can be upgraded to a 5. But if you do this I would go bigger like to a 40 amp that way you could always add more panels. What ever Tracker you have you have lost no money if you did upgrade it to a bigger unit, but you must order through Energenx to do this.Upgrades are possible but only if it's done like I said, you can never have enough power with solar.
            John
            John Bedini
            My homepage: http://johnbedini.net

            Comment


            • #21
              I have the 10A Solar Tracker 5. It sounds like then with just a 10A model I am limited to just this one panel...

              That's good news that I can upgrade later to a larger unit...

              Originally posted by John_Bedini View Post
              Branch,
              I do not know what Solar Tracker you have so I can not answer the question, If it is a tracker 5 then you can supply the load to the batteries. If you look at the drawing you can see that it splits the battery bank for two 12 volt systems, but we are talking a big system. I only run 12 volts at home and use a tracker 80 amp, I always use the biggest tracker then I can always add more panels if I need them. Only the tracker 5 systems will let you do this, as the tracker will supply the load not touching the battery unless it drops out because of clouds, then the batteries must supply the load. So what charger do you have? If you have an older one it can be upgraded to a 5. But if you do this I would go bigger like to a 40 amp that way you could always add more panels. What ever Tracker you have you have lost no money if you did upgrade it to a bigger unit, but you must order through Energenx to do this.Upgrades are possible but only if it's done like I said, you can never have enough power with solar.
              John

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              • #22
                Yes later you can upgrade.
                John


                Originally posted by Branch Gordon View Post
                I have the 10A Solar Tracker 5. It sounds like then with just a 10A model I am limited to just this one panel...

                That's good news that I can upgrade later to a larger unit...
                John Bedini
                My homepage: http://johnbedini.net

                Comment


                • #23
                  Mike,
                  I run about 2000 watts since I only use for the off grid office and yard lighting right now. The panels are 250 watts each. Batteries are DIE-Hards platinum deep cycle batteries they are all in parallel arrangement for 1000 AH total. 12 Volt System
                  John Bedini
                  My homepage: http://johnbedini.net

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    To All that have been sent questions about 18 watt solar panels.
                    Tesla Solar has been working on a 3 amp Tesla Solar 5 tracker. We decided to do this because of the request for portable power. The unit is portable and can be used to charge car batteries. The unit uses a linear amplifier regulator. All Tracker's use this design now, the Fet designs can not be made because of the failure in the Chinese parts at this time.The problem with these parts is as follows, inconsistencies in the chip and poor bonding. All the Tracker 5's have been re-designed to use Linear Regulator Amplifiers and massive heat sinks, or what as known as Wakefield forced air cooled at a set CFM. We test all the fans but again these Fans are coming from China and again we have found inconsistencies in the circuit of the fans. Some of the Solar Panels can and do push the voltage beyond the 12.5 volts so we drop the voltage though a 50 watt resistor, we are looking at reducing the speed to cover this. The 3 Amp Charger is a heat fin design and using no fan. This charger again is a linear charger amplifier. The best panels to use with this is a Goal Zero 18 watt panel, I hope to post a video here on the operation of this charger under sun light conditions. When choosing a panel you want the most voltage open circuit and everybody must remember that Solar Panels are laboratory tested, and that is not the real world condition so always expect to get far less power from them under sun condition and overcast sky's. During the winter I get the most power at 30 degrees in bright sunlight, as the panel warms up expect to loose some power. During the winter I have been wasting about 1Kw that I must dump as my batteries are charged to maximum at 15.3 volts, the power company will not allow me to put it back on the grid unless a contractor does it and it plays havoc with a smart meter. So I have been dumping the power into lighting up the back yard with 40 watt led lights. So again I will say when using these chargers you want the panel that gives you the most open circuit voltage for 12 volts that is about 22.5 volts. Living in the real world conditions expect to loose some of the rated output as you again are not under laboratory conditions. I hope this answered some of the questions that were sent to me. I will try to answer more soon. I will be covering at the conference the Linear Regulators Amplifiers, this includes the SSG. One more thing the question about Harbor Fright Thunderbolt Panels. They also have a very high open circuit voltage and some them do not have blocking diodes, but that is built into the charge regulator.
                    John B
                    John Bedini
                    My homepage: http://johnbedini.net

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                    • #25
                      Thanks for the update John.

                      The solar panels I am using on the 24V 80A TST5 have blocking diodes in them. Do you recommend removing them so as to get a higher voltage from the panels?

                      John K.

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                      • #26
                        some answers

                        Hi John K,
                        I would leave the diodes in place if the panels have them. No matter what you do John with the solar panels the efficiency of the panel is rated at laboratory conditions and that is a prefect condition. The real world condition is much different, so a 250 watt panel if your lucky you will only get say 205 watts and you will find some losses between the wire and charger. Linear chargers have drop out voltages depending where you set them, but if the panel can not push them with the high voltage then you will have nothing. The tracker 5 looks like a single ended amplifier so it has gain when it turns on and the voltage is sent to a small capacitor to hold a charge on the device. The Tracker 5 will push maxim and show the loss between the panel and the wire, and that is where the loss is. Adding one more diode is not going to make much difference unless the diode can not handle the current. If you study a linear regulator and look into the chip you will find it is a DC current amplifier and can be adjusted no matter what regulator it is so emitter followers are needed for high currents.
                        The circuit is very critical when dealing with current amplifiers and the devices used. Either device can be used (NPN/PNP) but must be chosen for gain and the proper SOA curve at the operating voltage. This is an analog science and digital is not a good choice except for control, and then it should be PWM. The new 10 amp charger uses this control with a large Heat Fin design and the devices have an arrangement to current limit them to not exceed the volt amps of the transformers used. So example if the transformer is rated at 12 amps then the devices must current limit at 10 amps to not exceed this. The idea with a solar charger is to push the battery as hard as you can for a short time and then taper, the trick is to not boil the battery away so the float is very important.
                        If you watch the battery you will see it gassing but you only want micro bubbles and not boiling as that would mean you have no control over heat in the cells. Now take the standard charge controller power point tracking and you will find the battery never charged and this is because you cant average the batteries charge otherwise you can not break down the sulphation in the plates, that's why the batteries are useless in two years, they are never charged.
                        The batteries must be kept floating at 15.3 volt with no boiling, that is the important thing. No way around that, you either have a battery that is charged or a battery that is not charged and is dieing, and then the battery ceases to function. Charging a battery to 13.80 volts is not charged as that leaves no reserve power to run things, so your generator starts running and you gain nothing. The Tracker 5 can adjust to the load within it's current range, meaning it does not touch the battery as the Tracker is running the load and is controlled by feedback in the amplifier circuit.
                        The only other way which takes time is a Solar Pulse Charging device but it may be to slow to give you what you want as you only have so much sun during the day and it keeps changing. You would only use this type of charger when you have bad batteries and your trying to bring them back to life.
                        After that you must push them up within a time frame to the 15 volts and hope they are not damaged from under charging. Gel batteries you can not push or they will dry out and you will have nothing, so floated batteries are the best for solar houses off grid. Most people do not understand any of this and assume they are off grid until the system fails and they must buy new batteries. Solar Houses must be calculated for the power used and I would have 50% reserve for days you have no sun. So here it's battery capacity that is important and then the charger having the current rating to supply all you need under load. Hope this answers some of the questions you have. Again the Tracker 5 is a different beast.
                        John B
                        Last edited by John_Bedini; 04-10-2014, 04:18 PM. Reason: spelling
                        John Bedini
                        My homepage: http://johnbedini.net

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Thanks for the detailed response John.

                          What you described is exactly what I am seeing with the 24V 80A Tracker 5. (S80A24)

                          I've been testing it at night with a lab power supply and I see what you mean about pushing the battery hard for a short time and then tapering. As soon as the battery hits 30.5V the current from the supply starts to taper off. If left long enough it will float at 30.5v and only draw less than half an amp from the supply.

                          There is no heat in the batteries and they don't boil away, just bubbling like a bottle of pop.

                          Like Peter said in his video, you can run the Tracker 5 with a lab power supply as long as it can put out the required voltage. It's not just for solar panels. I'm using mine more and more as a general charger off a power supply, as well as solar during the day.

                          John K.

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                          • #28
                            John K,
                            That's right you can use the Tracker 5 as a lab supply if you do it correctly. You have discovered the use of linear supplies that the US army uses in many applications. The main application is charging batteries because of it's regulation. Feedback makes that possible with in the regulator circuits. you will also notice that if you add a load to the batteries the current will supply the load without touching the batteries. If you remember I talked about this a while back.
                            You are going to be real surprised at what I'm going to show next here with micro mini chargers working on this same designs, I will give some examples and pictures and a video of the Tracker 5 3 amp working on cheep panels and then a micro mini charger doing the same power levels, I'm not going to deal with China parts that have a built in failure, everything will be made right here, now some things are not made here so we must test and test before we use them.
                            Chuck and I are working on the video right now. A charger that can charge your car battery in less then 6 Hrs after taking 10 amps for 1.6 Hrs on cheap Solar Panels. Charger cost at $105.00 dollars US. So in a few days I will post the video and pictures. Again the Tracker 5 is a Linear regulator Current Amplifier, all Tracker 5's work the same way.
                            John
                            John Bedini
                            My homepage: http://johnbedini.net

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Tesla 5 Micro mini

                              Here is an example of a Goal Zero panel that can be used with the Micro Mini Tesla 5 Tracker 3 amp charger. This panel can do 20 watts and it folds up. The charger will charge your car battery within 6 Hrs if conditions are right. The out plug on this type of panel is a problem so I just cut it off and add #10 lugs and use wing nuts on the input post. When using the micro mini the battery is connected first to give time for the Amplifier to bias itself. You may not think 20 watts is very much but when you have no power you will wish you had it to charge that 65 Amp Hr battery. it will push the battery right to 15.2 volts in the time allotted. These micro chargers are for emergency use. Example, would be if you left your lights on by accident inside your car or the headlights on, you could start your car in 30 minutes if the battery is in fair condition. I have done this many times. the other thing is campers with deep cycle batteries this could be used for that too. The other thing is you could make a small power generator for camping and use Led 40 watt lights. I will post some of the systems we have tested. I use a mini for all the garden lights around the yard. The charger can be ordered for use with Lithium Iron Sulfate batteries if you need that.
                              As I have said before here these are military type chargers condensed down. The charger has built in resettable overcurrent protection on the output side, input side is back flow diode for the panels. The thermal capability is a heat fin design inside the case. Pictures to follow.
                              John B



                              Last edited by John_Bedini; 04-11-2014, 03:41 AM. Reason: corec
                              John Bedini
                              My homepage: http://johnbedini.net

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Tesla Tracker 5 3 Amp unit

                                In this video Chuck and I are showing the new 3amp tracker 5 RV/ Marine charger. The chargers are usually used for emergency power and camping. With small solar panels, the fold up type as Goal Zero builds for backup solar

                                Last edited by John_Bedini; 04-11-2014, 06:43 PM. Reason: adding
                                John Bedini
                                My homepage: http://johnbedini.net

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