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  • #31
    Originally posted by Michael Luton View Post
    The biggest thing to remember is that we are taught and use models for electrical work. These models are not really what is going on, but instead a workable representation that is easier for us to understand and work with. The real thing is much more complicated and harder to conceptualize. For example if you want more depth of understanding what and how electricity works, check out Erick Dollard's information on electrical transmission lines. We have really gotten away from the circuits and equipment in the digital age that lent a lot of understanding to electricity that guided people like Erick. While maybe making the learning curve different, be thankful you don't have to work with things like waveguides, mag-amps, and tunable klystrons. By the way a negative resistance in a component is nothing complicated, it is just a breakdown region in that component. Not too uncommon in semi-conductors. Just look at the characteristics curve for a common 2N2222. This was a common biasing point in better equipment for stability reasons not for gain.

    The take away I'm trying to point out is do not shy away from developing your own model in your own head. This can help you see and understand in your own way. Often what I'm really looking for in these threads is not a right or wrong, instead I'm looking for a different way of seeing things to help my own model. As said by Don Campbell “If you want to make small changes, change the way you do things. If you want to make major changes, change the way you see things.”
    Yes it is on a to do list to study more of Eric's work, as I also want to go back and read more of Tesla's patents, likewise ET Whittaker has a very readable "History of the Luminiferous Ether" freely available online. Went through about a third of that, very interesting and will look to get back to it, for instance he points out that it wasn't very far back that there was a big debate as to whether there was a particle of heat. I don't want to look at these things right at this moment as I will read and learn many interesting things and would want to sprint off in the direction of each and end up looking like a dog chasing his tail. Faraday's lab notebooks are also freely available online, so there is that as well, but first let's see what happens with a battery charger.

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    • #32
      More on Nodes
      https://youtu.be/Y6NrSD3462w

      One idea for why the lights led to such a decrease in amp draw, maybe once they are glowing red, there is something going on with increased resistance. That's not what the textbooks say, they say as you heat a conductor resistance goes down. As I said can't explain it, but a strange finding.
      Last edited by ZPDM; 12-23-2019, 04:00 PM.

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      • #33
        Hi Paul,

        Originally posted by ZPDM View Post
        More on Nodes

        One idea for why the lights led to such a decrease in amp draw, maybe once they are glowing red, there is something going on with increased resistance. That's not what the textbooks say, they say as you heat a conductor resistance goes down. As I said can't explain it, but a strange finding.
        I think you spoke in error. As the heat in a conductor goes up so does the resistance. That's why an incandescent bulb in the base circuit of an SSG causes it to self servo. And thermistors are used in a lot of circuits to counteract the effect of a normal resistor and provide temperature stability.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Gary Hammond View Post
          Hi Paul,

          I think you spoke in error. As the heat in a conductor goes up so does the resistance. That's why an incandescent bulb in the base circuit of an SSG causes it to self servo. And thermistors are used in a lot of circuits to counteract the effect of a normal resistor and provide temperature stability.
          You're Right!!! Thank heavens, I remembered temperature/resistance backwards and that was confusing the heck out of me. That, I think, explains what I was seeing with the bulbs, halogen was likely worse as halogens run real hot, at least my old halogen floor lamp did until they banned those I think because of fire hazard. Thank you!

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          • #35
            Pulsing the Coil
            https://youtu.be/ryvWnAPVpe0

            This video is maybe a bit incoherent at times, I thought I was recording sometimes when I wasn't. But the jist is a long pulse gives you the maximum volts out you will see from a spike. As you decrease the time for the pulse you can see when you get to 0.63 of the maximal pulse you are at one time constant. Must also admit I was wrong earlier in a comment or video when I said a single pulse cannot have a higher voltage than your input voltage, saw that with a 100 uF cap, heaven knows what it would have been with a 1 uF cap. It still strikes me as a back EMF, but clearly if it is a back EMF then the textbooks are wrong that back EMF voltage cannot exceed the input voltage.

            In short this first battery charger per the spreadsheet and meters should not work, only about two thirds of the charge should be recaptured (Will run the DC motor while recharging though haha). We have some cards up our sleeves though as noted in earlier videos. If this comes out about as predicted that is fine. If there is some magic with the batteries doing some cap/battery rebound and extra spikes occurring back to source, that's great, awesome if that is all that is needed. However, unless this is way off from predicted i.e. 1/10th or 1/3rd recaptured, I think it is quite okay as we have ways to reasonably look to improve things going forward. Lastly everything looked at before was going to caps, going to batteries will be electrochemical not electrostatic, so who knows what will be seen!!
            Last edited by ZPDM; 12-24-2019, 02:59 AM.

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            • #36
              Back emf is the voltage that a magnet on a rotor causes. For instance you apply 5 volts to a coil to attract a magnet ...when the magnet is approaching the coil it's field is iducing an oposite voltage to what your putting in so you in effect are taking 5 volts and having 3 volts shoved back at it by the magnet. That is back emf. A coil pulse recovery is an inductive collapse and will increase voltage infinitely to dissipate the field.
              Last edited by Bradley Malone; 12-24-2019, 03:27 PM.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by mpgmike View Post
                Here is the 2nd configuration; charge Cap1, parallel diode, discharge into Cap2:
                [ATTACH=CONFIG]7544[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]7545[/ATTACH]

                Please note that the scaling is not necessarily the same from post to post, as I am adjusting volts-per-division, and even time divisions to show the form of the wave more so than apples-to-apples comparison.
                Hi mpgmike,
                That's called a freewheeling diode, it helps in regauging(encharging'') the spike of the same capacitor as well.'
                reffer to Tom bearden's step-charging circuit.
                Rgds,
                Faraday88.
                Last edited by Faraday88; 12-25-2019, 07:27 AM. Reason: correction
                'Wisdom comes from living out of the knowledge.'

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                • #38
                  Mike,

                  Finally got over my embarrassment enough to look at your scope shots. It looks to me like the ringing is only visible with the addition of the diode, if I am reading correctly.

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                  • #39
                    I really appreciate. https://www.gnovabiotech.org/pharma-...-companies.php

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                    • #40
                      Update:
                      Ran the first run->charge battery tests
                      1) with the DC motor in place running in series 400 uS on 800 uS off was recapturing about 50-60%.
                      a) you can rectify the spike off the motor coil, to my great surprise this was a 130 Volt + spike, though it was too low power to budge a Li-on even a hundredth of a volt. When you rectify the spike off the motor the RPMs slightly increase as seen with an SSG.
                      2) Removed the motor and replaced with just varied coils I had lying around. Was able to find an arrangement where the node coil was adding ~ 20% power. This occurred when the run batteries where going to the charge bats in parallel (i.e. at 4 volts) this brings up the question of whether it is better/worse/no different to charge the bats in parallel or series. Amp output increases a lot in charging say to 4 volts versus 8, however, as two batteries in parallel will have a capacity of "2" and in series of "1", it would need to double to keep pace, though one might also get a bit of a branch current going on with the batteries in parallel, in short, probably need to just look at it to see how each behaves. With the power I was able to see off a node, will be important to try and set-up series nodes, have been saying "oh, just add more nodes" but haven't actually done this yet.
                      3) Put the motor back in and began dropping the on time pulse length. At 100 uS on 100 uS off the 5 (~20 volts) run batteries going to 4 series (~14 volts) charge batteries the motor was just able to spin, 100 uS from memory is about at 1/40th to 1/50th of the time constant of that coil. If one disconnected meters let it run for maybe 40 minutes, shut down, rest it for a few minutes what I saw was the run batteries down say 0.02 volts and charge batteries up say 0.03 volts. The difficulty here is the amp draw is so small one would likely need to run it for maybe a week or two to really see something and one might just find that it was just a function of where the run and charge batteries happened to be on their respective charge/discharge curves at the time. Also, unless one is good enough with circuit design to eliminate the arduino, power is small enough that one could say well things are running off the laptop through the arduino. But, that's what I saw. This does introduce another thing to examine at some point. The arduino, goes down to 1 uS pulses and to be conservative let's say it is good down to 3-5 uS. The above was seen at 100 uS. One might start getting rid of winds on the coil and shortening the pulse length. One would have more amps running through the shortened coil, and if the same effect was seen at 1/40th 1/50th of the time constant, it might not take a week to confirm. Am not going to dare start messing with the coil I've started with at this time as there are too many things to look at to introduce that variable yet, but certainly intend to look at that before too long.
                      4) Was thinking of ways to try and gather mechanical power off the field flux. With arduino you have control of pulse length/duty cycle but not functional control as in "magnet here, coil turn on" as with the SSG. You might think of putting in an iron core, suspending a permanent magnet on a spring above the core, putting a piezo between core and magnet/spring when coil turns on magnet mashes piezo, not sure if that would work well but is an idea and should at least do something. Was also thinking of putting a magnet on a spring such that it gets sucked into or pushed away when coil turns on. Could this be set up such that the flux induced by the moving magnet augments the coil?? Could the motion be significant enough such that one could say put a wooden rod on the magnet run it out 6 inches attach another magnet and put a coil around the second magnet and get appreciable voltage/power?? In short don't spin a rotor, make a piston. For the most part just ideas at this point.
                      5) Saw something pretty odd that I want to look into. Was wondering whether with Li-ons I will at some point see the battery conditioning effect, with its possible advantages/disadvantages, kick in and got to thinking about full wave rectification. What I saw with an FWBR was if one had a maximal spike of say 15 volts from a coil with a backward diode set up, with the FWBR, power just turned on, one connects the power to the collector something like a 12 volt spike, disconnect the power, 15 volt spike, and was thinking to myself "Happy Serendipity" or something to that effect, that's a doubling. Now when I instead, put the power into a cap, shorted the cap and captured the induction into a larger cap, if with a backwards diode one saw say a fourfold increase in charge, one did not see an 8 fold with a FWBR one saw like a 1.1 fold increase, almost the entire effect was gone. It is strange enough that I want to go back and repeat it just to be sure I had it all set up right and saw what I think I saw. I do recall that John Bedini at one time commented that a FWBR is not the way to go with a SSG. So I am not real optimistic about FWBR then again this isn't a SSG. Also, could one put a FWBR on a node? That could be nice, or would it of necessity short the circuit?

                      So some things I plan to look at next. Are multiple nodes straightforward? Higher amperage coil, charge bats in parallel and series, FWBR on main coil and/or node(s), hope I haven't already conditioned the charge batteries, may need to discharge them but would cost me a day.

                      Hope all had a nice Christmas, may the peace of the Risen Lord Jesus Christ the Messiah be with you and yours this season and in the days to come.
                      Last edited by ZPDM; 12-27-2019, 03:21 PM.

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                      • #41
                        Hi Paul,

                        I've had good success with this circuit using only two diodes in a back to back arrangement charging two caps. You then take the load from across the two caps in a voltage doubling scheme.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Gary Hammond View Post
                          Hi Paul,

                          I've had good success with this circuit using only two diodes in a back to back arrangement charging two caps. You then take the load from across the two caps in a voltage doubling scheme.

                          [ATTACH=CONFIG]7562[/ATTACH]
                          Hi Gary, am interested, three times now I've gotten "Invalid Attachment specified. If you followed a valid link, please notify the administrator". Prolly a problem on my end, maybe on your end, if neither, let's raise a ruckus

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                          • #43
                            Two Negative Studies: https://youtu.be/cNaApKyuhvc

                            One should publish negative findings as well right? With two mismatched coils, nodes in series don't work. Am 90-95% certain it is that the coils are in series and the inductances are mismatched so they are oscillating on the same wire at different frequencies. Also believe I recall John Bedini commenting in a video on nodes and saying offhand, "well yea you want the coils matched but here is the idea" or something to that effect. So 95% certain the problem is different coils but won't know until I wind a couple matched coils. Also, FWBR of a node works, but doesn't work any better than single diode rectification. Not sure why, would think it would be better but no. Am going to throw a FWBR at the primary coil and see if I get the same sort of spike at least as with 1 diode rectification. The thinking being is, perhaps FWBR would get rid of the negative charge conditioning of batteries that makes it difficult to switch them between charge and run positions, if this battery conditioning even happens with Li-on batteries. As a silver lining did confirm the node is putting out an extra 20-25% charge, as I was just throwing random coils at the circuit, so not crazy to hope for an extra 30-40% charge off a node.
                            Last edited by ZPDM; 12-28-2019, 12:15 AM.

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                            • #44
                              Hi Paul,

                              Originally posted by ZPDM View Post
                              Hi Gary, am interested, three times now I've gotten "Invalid Attachment specified. If you followed a valid link, please notify the administrator". Prolly a problem on my end, maybe on your end, if neither, let's raise a ruckus
                              Sorry about that. I'll try again. For some reason the scan shows up sideways. When I tried to rotate it 90% it wouldn't load properly. It's a rough sketch, but you can get the idea.

                              voltage doubler 001.jpg

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                              • #45
                                Thank you Gary,

                                That does look interesting, it is not at all the same but vaguely resembles a Colpitt's oscillator. When I get some time I look forward to playing around with it.

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