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  • Tesla Switch Looped SSG Pulser

    So based on this:
    http://www.icehouse.net/john1/tesla.html
    batt22.jpg
    I've been doing this:

    I neglected to draw in the trigger bulb regulator, but I think you know where it goes - on the trigger... :-)
    On mine this was tricky to tune, it did not want to start right off the bat. I went back to the normal primary battery with charging battery, tuned it, then switched to the TS hook up and it was much easier.
    Not going to claim anything, but if you have 4 batteries and an SSG lying around, it'll be worth your while to give it a go.
    try it with 1 ONE transistor first just in case you hook something up wrong.
    Kind regards - Patrick A.
    Last edited by min2oly; 06-21-2016, 09:23 PM. Reason: times up

  • #2
    Hi Patrick,

    That looks interesting, but I must be a little dense - I don't see how the coil collapse feeds anything to the batteries the way you have it drawn.

    Doesn't the discharge just short circuit back into the coil through the diode across it? I may be overlooking something obvious and would appreciate an explanation of how it works.

    Comment


    • #3
      Good eye Gary,
      I uploaded the correct jpg now
      LMK if you think the diode across the paralleled batteries is not necessary. I do have my bike wheel running this way as I type... for quite some time now... add more paralleled batteries as you like.
      Kind Regards - Patrick A.
      Last edited by min2oly; 06-19-2016, 06:55 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi Patrick,

        I think I see what the circuit is doing all except for one thing. How does the top diode keep from providing a short circuit back to the coil and force the coil discharge to take the higher voltage path through the other diode and recharge the serial connected batteries? Isn't the top diode forward biased in parallel with the other diode and two series batteries. If the top diode was a transistor that opened and closed simultaneously with the main transistor, I could understand how it works.

        I also don't understand the need for the diode in parallel with the parallel connected batteries.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Gary Hammond View Post
          Hi Patrick,

          I think I see what the circuit is doing all except for one thing. How does the top diode keep from providing a short circuit back to the coil and force the coil discharge to take the higher voltage path through the other diode and recharge the serial connected batteries? Isn't the top diode forward biased in parallel with the other diode and two series batteries. If the top diode was a transistor that opened and closed simultaneously with the main transistor, I could understand how it works.

          I also don't understand the need for the diode in parallel with the parallel connected batteries.
          It's not the diode that "keep from providing a short circuit back to the coil ", it's the natural path provided by the diode going to the negative of the 24 volts which "allows" the discharge to be placed there (across the 24 volts).

          Very smooth yes?

          And yes I asked if you thought the diode across the paralleled batteries was needed. I have it running on my 7 transistor set up and did not want to remove it while running - do you say I should remove it?

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi Patrick,

            I understand the natural path provided by the diode going to the negative of the 24 volts. What I don't understand is what keeps the coil discharge from taking the lower resistance path through the top diode instead. Does the top diode switch more slowly than the other one? I always thought electricity took the "path of least resistance" or is there something going on with the radiant that I'm not grasping?

            And just because I don't understand the purpose of the diode across the paralleled batteries doesn't mean I think you should remove it. If it works ok that way why not leave it? I'm just trying to understand it's purpose and why you put it there.

            My understanding of circuits is mostly based on conventional theory, and somewhat limited at that. I have a hard time grasping all the concepts involved with radiant and pulsed DC.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Gary Hammond View Post
              Hi Patrick,

              I understand the natural path provided by the diode going to the negative of the 24 volts. What I don't understand is what keeps the coil discharge from taking the lower resistance path through the top diode instead. Does the top diode switch more slowly than the other one? I always thought electricity took the "path of least resistance" or is there something going on with the radiant that I'm not grasping?

              And just because I don't understand the purpose of the diode across the paralleled batteries doesn't mean I think you should remove it. If it works ok that way why not leave it? I'm just trying to understand it's purpose and why you put it there.

              My understanding of circuits is mostly based on conventional theory, and somewhat limited at that. I have a hard time grasping all the concepts involved with radiant and pulsed DC.
              I hope my questions are coming across sincerely - my understanding of ckts is through trial and error :-)
              Your educated inference as to how the energy is flowing sounds reasonable. All I know is the spike does go to the 24V series bats thereby recharging them that's where the energy comes from to run the SSG. The paralleled bats get their charge from the same place the 24 volt seriesed batts.

              I know this via trial and error, if you remove the diode from the neg of the 24 volts, the spike does discharge across the coil. This is very evident from the bucking reaction that follows.

              Remember my previous posts - you can send that spike to a 2nd 3rd 4th coil and speed the wheel up as well... I'm actually pretty surprised no one gave that one a try.

              well, nuph said... I hope to hear from someone who gives this a go.
              Cheers - Patrick A.

              Comment


              • #8
                just tried this.... didnt look to special at first but now my two batteries in series have been just sitting at the same voltages for the last 30 minutes and the 12v side has gone up 0.25 volts .... not using the diode between 12v pos and neg as it didnt seem to change anything

                Comment


                • #9
                  That circuit should run no matter what because no matter how many batts are parelleled, it is still 12 volts and you have a 12v differential between the 2 batts in series and the opposed parallel bank. That part is not an issue as far as I can tell.

                  Can you post a scope shot with the scope probe across the 24v bank? You should see the discharge and then a recharging pulse.

                  In the normal SSG, the spikes goes to a different battery that is then connected back to the positive of the input battery.

                  If you have enough power windings to get a pretty strong spike and you scope that input battery, you will find that the 12v battery delivers to the circuit and you will see a recharging bump on the scope. That is because the 1n4007 is slow that it allows some of the spike to go from the coil straight back to the input battery and give a little recharging pulse to the input battery.

                  If you use faster diodes like a UF4007 diode, which is 50-75ns speed, you will probably find there is no more recharging pulse going to the input battery and therefore all of it goes to the output battery. At least that is the case when we scoped it all out on a 3 battery arrangement at Graham Gunderson's shop. Do you want extended running time or do you want the output battery to get most of it? Up to you and you can definitely get longer running times on a battery by allowing it to receive a recharging pulse, but for the most part the batteries only like to be charged or discharged but not alternately charged and discharged.

                  18 years ago in the beginning of the SG "movement", there were issues with sending the recovery back to the input battery and John called it "ghosting" (like it just disappears) - you can find all of that back on the Keelynet site and is probably not the best use of the recovery.

                  You can take the recovery and send it back to the front of the circuit so the circuit uses it but it never touches the input battery. It reduces the input requirement, but you lose out on the chemical advantage of making use of the recovery since you need a capacitor. The chemistry seems to give you back more than you can measure electrically going into the chemistry. Circuit not provided, but I can.

                  If you had a trifilar or a recovery winding for each power winding so that they are isolated, you put a diode at the bottom of the recovery windings and put that to the + of the parallel batteries and the other end of the recover winding to the negative of the parallel batteries and you can get rid of the 3 diodes you show. The parallel batts will receive most of the recovery and with a 1n4007, the input battery will automatically receive part of the spike anyway. With enough batts in parallel, my guess is you could do well by keeping all parallel batts in the same place except for just one of them. If you had 3 in parallel, leave 2 ALWAYS, then just rotate one of them after the lower voltage one is added, it will get charged from the other 2 parallel ones plus, the current punch, then the spike. With batteries 1 and 2 in the series bank and that actually would be along the lines of one variation of SG self runner that John had - that was cap discharges to multiple batts in parallel on the back end while leaving all of them and rotating just one. I'm speculating you could do the same with this arrangement.
                  Last edited by Aaron Murakami; 06-19-2016, 10:29 PM.
                  Aaron Murakami





                  “You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.” ― Richard Buckminster Fuller

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Aaron Murakami View Post
                    That circuit should run no matter what because no matter how many batts are parelleled, it is still 12 volts and you have a 12v differential between the 2 batts in series and the opposed parallel bank. That part is not an issue as far as I can tell.

                    Can you post a scope shot with the scope probe across the 24v bank? You should see the discharge and then a recharging pulse.

                    In the normal SSG, the spikes goes to a different battery that is then connected back to the positive of the input battery.

                    If you have enough power windings to get a pretty strong spike and you scope that input battery, you will find that the 12v battery delivers to the circuit and you will see a recharging bump on the scope. That is because the 1n4007 is slow that it allows some of the spike to go from the coil straight back to the input battery and give a little recharging pulse to the input battery.

                    If you use faster diodes like a UF4007 diode, which is 50-75ns speed, you will probably find there is no more recharging pulse going to the input battery and therefore all of it goes to the output battery. At least that is the case when we scoped it all out on a 3 battery arrangement at Graham Gunderson's shop. Do you want extended running time or do you want the output battery to get most of it? Up to you and you can definitely get longer running times on a battery by allowing it to receive a recharging pulse, but for the most part the batteries only like to be charged or discharged but not alternately charged and discharged.

                    18 years ago in the beginning of the SG "movement", there were issues with sending the recovery back to the input battery and John called it "ghosting" (like it just disappears) - you can find all of that back on the Keelynet site and is probably not the best use of the recovery.

                    You can take the recovery and send it back to the front of the circuit so the circuit uses it but it never touches the input battery. It reduces the input requirement, but you lose out on the chemical advantage of making use of the recovery since you need a capacitor. The chemistry seems to give you back more than you can measure electrically going into the chemistry. Circuit not provided, but I can.

                    If you had a trifilar or a recovery winding for each power winding so that they are isolated, you put a diode at the bottom of the recovery windings and put that to the + of the parallel batteries and the other end of the recover winding to the negative of the parallel batteries and you can get rid of the 3 diodes you show. The parallel batts will receive most of the recovery and with a 1n4007, the input battery will automatically receive part of the spike anyway. With enough batts in parallel, my guess is you could do well by keeping all parallel batts in the same place except for just one of them. If you had 3 in parallel, leave 2 ALWAYS, then just rotate one of them after the lower voltage one is added, it will get charged from the other 2 parallel ones plus, the current punch, then the spike. With batteries 1 and 2 in the series bank and that actually would be along the lines of one variation of SG self runner that John had - that was cap discharges to multiple batts in parallel on the back end while leaving all of them and rotating just one. I'm speculating you could do the same with this arrangement.
                    Brodie - thanks for giving it a go. Pretty cool eh... I tune it so the primary drops only 0.1 - 0.05 volts on initial start up, this means charging is slow on the paralleled at first.

                    Aaron thanks for the input (pun intended) I kind of felt that the pulse is being distributed through the whole system but was not too sure about it.

                    I've attempted to "backcharge" "backpop" the primary ever since I started this journey years ago... and yes, I love the ghosting term because that's what it felt like every time with all the methods I've tried...

                    This is different. the path the energy travels is different and the front 24 volts does realize the spike.
                    Kind Regards - Patrick A.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hey Patrick,

                      Very interesting thread you got here with thought provoking responses on the 3batt setup. I did run a series of experiments with the 3 battery system proposed by Bradley Malone incorporating the Peter L. modification diode with my SSG (SG?) back in the spring and the results are posted on a thread from that period. I was unable to break any performance barriers during the testing but did find a marked improvement over the standard SSG configuration.

                      So your efforts are of definite interest for further investigation as time permits. This being summer in the north country, most of my attention is focused on outdoor activities and projects. My limited experimental focus time has been on the Basic Free Energy device replication as promoted by Turion and Matt Jones on EF - this still incorporates the basic three battery concept by JB but with some twists. An interesting side play.

                      Look forward to more of your work and fine videos...
                      Yaro
                      Yaro

                      "The Universe is under no obligation to make sense to you." -Neil Degrasse Tyson

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I've not seen anyone do it this way:


                        You can also use a micro controller as a switch rather than the mechanical reeds I'm using here. The schematic would be the same just add micro controller to the DPDT relay's...
                        Having fun - Patrick A

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          min2oly,

                          It is very likely that you have found out how Baldinelli was doing his dual relay charger.

                          Regards

                          Lman

                          P.S. Just forgot to thank you for sharing this as I find it important.
                          Last edited by Lman; 07-07-2016, 01:26 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Lman View Post
                            min2oly,

                            It is very likely that you have found out how Baldinelli was doing his dual relay charger.

                            Regards

                            Lman

                            P.S. Just forgot to thank you for sharing this as I find it important.
                            Hi Lman,
                            I did a quick google to try and find out more about this Baldinelli, I find: http://www.energeticforum.com/renewa...y-charger.html over at energitic forum and some obscure articles with no information at all. do you happen to have any more info on it? there is only mention of "dual relay" - that could mean anything.
                            Thanks - Patrick

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hi min2oly,

                              No, unfortunately I have no other information than what is out there on the net.
                              But ever since I watched EFTV22 I was wondering how Baldinelli "fits into the picture" as J.B. mentioned about him and his charger in relation to the Tesla switch. Seems to me Baldinelli provoked all the thoughts about switching techniques later.
                              In the first post on the thread at energeticforum Aaron posted : "it appears that the "Tesla Switch" was Ronald Brandt's attempt at working with Baldinelli's Dual Relay Charger."
                              One of the Tesla switch versions built by John Bedini and Eike Mueller was done with a relay as can be seen on the last picture on this link.
                              http://www.icehouse.net/john1/pictures.html
                              And just these days I noticed a diagram given in the book "Experiments with a Kromrey and Brand-Tesla converter" that it has been a 3PDT relay that they used.

                              I find the article about Baldinelli very very interesting. It does not tells us how it is done of course, but gives enough information if you think. For example it says "dual relay charger capable of creating AC power from a 12-volt battery." If it was just single battery we know now that this is possible too. Especially with the last three circuits that John shared here :
                              http://www.icehouse.net/john1/tesla.html
                              Further the article says "can power an automobile or provide 1000 to 1500 volts - enough to illuminate a house." We know that we can't get that high potential just from the battery and later in the article we read that the "device developed through his attempt to improve the automobile alternator". So, inductor is involved, the spike for sure .
                              Other things mentioned : "battery charger that has AC power"; "about the same size as an automobile battery"; "The device is solid state", Gallucio says. “It has not moving parts. No chemicals, no batteries or fuel cells. The materials and parts are readily available and the output can be varied by changing the size of the device". ; "powered the vehicle without depleting the battery".

                              Anyway, you are right and I too have not seen anyone do it the way you did it using the SSG. Not to mention that we still can charge another battery/ies and do other things.

                              I was thinkering once with dual SPDT relays and single battery, but I was having the concept totally wrong since I was trying to get the spikes out of the relays to charge the battery and soon I left it aside getting distracted by other things.


                              Regards

                              Lman

                              Comment

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