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Ron Cole's Bipolar Switch

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  • #61
    Hi James, it's similar to a TS - but with one battery. The name (Ron Cole Bipolar Switch) comes from the name of the schematic that John Bedini has had on his web page for years, which is post #1 of this thread.

    The concept of the switch is fairly simple:-
    1. Charge two capacitors in parallel through the load from the battery.
    2. Discharge the same capacitors in series through the load to re-charge the battery.

    The idea being that you can power the load for longer than if you just ran the load "normally".

    John K.

    Comment


    • #62
      Originally posted by John_Koorn View Post
      .............The concept of the switch is fairly simple:-
      1. Charge two capacitors in parallel through the load from the battery.
      2. Discharge the same capacitors in series through the load to re-charge the battery.

      The idea being that you can power the load for longer than if you just ran the load "normally".

      John K.
      Oscillating power between a source and a storage device, while making it do work in both directions! Sort of reminds me of Jim Murray's SERPS device.

      Comment


      • #63
        Originally posted by John_Koorn View Post
        Hi Nityesh,

        Not yet with the Ron Cole switch, but yes with previous experiments.

        At the moment I'm still in the "replicate, don't innovate" mode

        John K.
        Remember that you changed some components from the original Ron Cole Bipolar Switch.

        Originally posted by John_Koorn View Post

        -: Replaced 10V zener diode with LM7812
        -: Repalced 2N4919 with MJE2955T
        -: Replaced MJ15022 with MJL21193G
        -: Replaced MJ15003 with MJL21194G
        -: Replaced 2N6306 with MJL21194G
        -: Replaced 4N26 with H11D1
        With the 4 battery Bedini Tesla Switch it was suggested to power the SG3524N circuit with an adjustable voltage regulator from 5V to 8V. I believe this is to adjust the brightness of the LEDs inside the H11D1 opto-couplers.

        With my Tri-Symmetrical 3 Battery Tesla Switch I had to use the correct value of resistance in series with 3 opto-coupler LEDs for clean switching. My driver circuit with the supply voltage of 5V, a 200ohm resister worked the very best. If I went to 100ohm = very bad switching, 300ohm = bad switching & 200ohm = good switching.

        The 4N26 and H11D1 are different opto-isolators. You can check the voltage drops across the collector and emitter, of each transistor to check if they are fully saturated, when turned on, and an open circuit when switched off. So start with tuning the bias of the LEDs, either from adjusting the voltage to the 555 Timer driver circuit, or adjust, the series resistor (in series with the opto-isolator LEDs).

        I just wanted to tell you about my experience of getting the H11D1 to switch the best, and hope this info is useful.

        Most
        Kindest
        Regards
        Nityesh Schnaderbeck

        Comment


        • #64
          Ah yes, there were some minor changes . These were mainly due to the fact that I had the parts on hand. I'm still experimenting with resistor values, just about across the board.

          The "innovations" I have planned are mainly to do with the timing circuits - SG3524N or PIC based. However, I do like the way Ron has the optos connected.

          Thanks for the tips on tuning the bias for the opto LEDs. that will come in handy

          Anyway, I must get on to making the board. I'm a bit slower these days - got to make sure the bills are paid and the family is happy first

          John K.

          Comment


          • #65
            I have have this circuit up and running.



            So far the battery voltage has remained frozen, (12hours later), With this circuit the battery is either charging of discharging, not both.

            Originally posted by John_Koorn View Post
            Hi Nityesh,
            John_Korn Have you tried to completely isolate the 555 timer driver circuit, from the battery switching circuit, and run the 555 timer driver circuit on it's own power supply, with your Ron Cole Switch.
            John K.
            John_Koorn, I didn't explain the reason for my suggestion. The reason is, so that you have the most contrast between charging and discharging of the battery. The 555 Timer circuit is a small load, and it may reduce the contrast between charging and discharging of the battery. I would try to isolate the 555 timer circuit and run on it's own power supply. Then connect it back to how it was, to see if it changes your results.

            Happy experimenting with your circuit board.

            Most
            Kindest
            Regards
            Nityesh Schnaderbeck
            Last edited by Nityesh Schnaderbeck; 12-15-2015, 05:45 PM.

            Comment


            • #66
              Hi Nityesh,

              Congrats on getting your circuit running. What are you using for a load?

              On your suggestion - yes I have run it with the timing circuit completely isolated and running off it's own battery. To be honest, I did not notice a difference.

              John K.

              Comment


              • #67
                Originally posted by John_Koorn View Post
                Congrats on getting your circuit running. What are you using for a load?

                John K.
                I am using 2 back to back yellow 5mm LEDs as the load. Here is the picture of my setup. The battery is 2 LI-Ion cells, connected in series and reads 7.36V battery voltage.




                Originally posted by John_Koorn View Post

                On your suggestion - yes I have run it with the timing circuit completely isolated and running off it's own battery. To be honest, I did not notice a difference.

                John K.
                Well done, It is good to know that it does not make any noticeable difference, with the 555 timer circuit isolated. Now you are narrowing down the variables.

                Have fun

                Most
                Kindest
                Regards
                Nityesh Schnaderbeck
                Last edited by Nityesh Schnaderbeck; 12-15-2015, 08:04 PM.

                Comment


                • #68
                  This was my effort at a Tesla Switch with brushes.
                  Driven by an independent universal motor doing up to 25,000 RPM's.
                  The segments on the commutator can be soldered to fit many different frequencies.
                  Alas very little testing was done before my break.


                  tesla switch.jpgtesla switch1.jpgtesla switch2.jpgtesla switch3.PNG
                  Cant spend it when your dead.

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by Nityesh Schnaderbeck View Post
                    I am using 2 back to back yellow 5mm LEDs as the load. Here is the picture of my setup. The battery is 2 LI-Ion cells, connected in series and reads 7.36V battery voltage.






                    Well done, It is good to know that it does not make any noticeable difference, with the 555 timer circuit isolated. Now you are narrowing down the variables.

                    Have fun

                    Most
                    Kindest
                    Regards
                    Nityesh Schnaderbeck
                    Hey Nityesh,
                    Just a recommandation... Incandecent bulb or higher Wattage LED's should be used as the Load....
                    Rgds,
                    Faraday88.
                    'Wisdom comes from living out of the knowledge.'

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by Deuis View Post
                      This was my effort at a Tesla Switch with brushes.
                      Driven by an independent universal motor doing up to 25,000 RPM's.
                      The segments on the commutator can be soldered to fit many different frequencies.
                      Alas very little testing was done before my break.


                      Nice work John!

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Were you trying to produce AC with this one?


                        Originally posted by Deuis View Post
                        This was my effort at a Tesla Switch with brushes.
                        Driven by an independent universal motor doing up to 25,000 RPM's.
                        The segments on the commutator can be soldered to fit many different frequencies.
                        Alas very little testing was done before my break.


                        [ATTACH=CONFIG]5635[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]5636[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]5637[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]5638[/ATTACH]

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          To be honest I cant remember, might be a typo.
                          Three years ago i put it down and haven't touched it since.
                          With a new workshop being completed it will be soon time to bring them out once again.
                          Problem I had with this machine is how to tune it, unless there is a simple way to find the resonance i need.

                          Originally posted by min2oly View Post
                          Were you trying to produce AC with this one?
                          Cant spend it when your dead.

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by Deuis View Post
                            To be honest I cant remember, might be a typo.
                            Three years ago i put it down and haven't touched it since.
                            With a new workshop being completed it will be soon time to bring them out once again.
                            Problem I had with this machine is how to tune it, unless there is a simple way to find the resonance i need.
                            I see, you can loose the diodes and caps if you do it like this:
                            https://youtu.be/KVdvvPDlagw?t=4m2s
                            there should be one more cap after the FWBR size depending on load...

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              If I remember the load was the universal motor.
                              This setup if fully mechanical, the switching is soldered into the commutators - no relays.
                              I will have to look back into why i designed the circuit that way.
                              I think the caps were there to minimize sparking on the commutators while also drip feeding back through the circuit.

                              Originally posted by min2oly View Post
                              I see, you can loose the diodes and caps if you do it like this:
                              https://youtu.be/KVdvvPDlagw?t=4m2s
                              there should be one more cap after the FWBR size depending on load...
                              Cant spend it when your dead.

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Originally posted by John_Koorn View Post
                                This thread is for discussing Ron Cole's Bipolar Switch from 1989 that was posted on John Bedini's web site.

                                Few questions spur in my mind...
                                1) John Bedini in his website did mention that he never used this circuit and also that there is something not correct about it! My immediate guess is about the 10 k pot in the emitter circuit of the 'Discharge -Transistor" why would you need a pot that high here??
                                2)The duty cycle control is not shown between(pin 6&7) of the 555 chip, it is essentially high ON time and Low -OFF time square wave.
                                3)There is an optimum value of the Resistance of the load for the circuit to work as per its principle.
                                4) The frequency is also critical as this changes with the given size of the battery.
                                5) How did Bill Nelson use Microwave frequency to this circuit? how is that a Cap as large as 30,000UF finds Resonant tuning at microwave Frequencies??
                                Rgds,
                                Faraday88.[/QUOTE][/QUOTE]
                                'Wisdom comes from living out of the knowledge.'

                                Comment

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